Freo's View

A FREO SUNDAY FULL OF LIFE

 

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It is going to be a gorgeous day in the best port city in the world, so make sure to take advantage of all that is on offer today.

Of course start the day at the Freo Farmers Market at Fremantle College, which is open till midday.

Then off to Bathers Beach for the Sculpture at Bathers exhibition, and from there to the Fremantle Arts Centre for the free courtyard music session from2-4pm. Gordon Koang is one of South Sudan’s biggest popstars, so bring your dancing shoes!

Then head of to the port where at Victoria Quay there are Foodtrucks in B Shed with DJs and a great ambience. And at the Maritime Museum the free concert is on from 5pm with Lorraine Cliiford, The Lost Quays and Dan Howls.

Have fun. I’ll see you around. ; >)

 

Roel Loopers

HARBOUR SUNDAYS GREAT SETTING

Posted in city of fremantle, concerts, culture, fremantle port, Uncategorized by freoview on February 10, 2020

 

 

Here some arty impressions from the Harbour Sundays concert on the deck of the Fremantle Maritime Museum.

The band of very young musicians was excellent, but it would have been even better if they had turned the sound down a bit, as the deck is not that large and there is no real need to turn it up as high as they did.

It is a very popular session and a real delight to watch the port activities and sunset from there.

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE HIGH STREET UPGRADE STARTS

Posted in city of fremantle, freight, fremantle port, state government, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on January 22, 2020

 

High Street

 

A groundbreaking ceremony was held at the Fremantle HIGH STREET UPGRADE project this morning with Premier Mark McGowan, the Member for Fremantle, Minister Simone McGurk, Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt, and Mainroads officials, but no one though about inviting this Freo blogger, so all I can show is this latest plan.

There will no doubt be traffic disruptions when the work starts in a few weeks from now, so I will try to keep you up to date, but that will depend a lot on receiving the relevant information.

Roel Loopers

 

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PEACE BOAT ARRIVES IN FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle port, peace, Uncategorized by freoview on January 9, 2020

 

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I am looking forward to the first Fremantle Council meeting next Wednesday because it has been a slow news  period for too long, as far as I am concerned.

But this morning I went and took these two arty photos of the Ocean Dream PEACE BOAT, which arrived in Fremantle Port yesterday, from the foot bridge.

Roel Loopers

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CLIPPER ROUND THE WORLD YACHTS LEAVES FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle port, sailing, Uncategorized by freoview on December 22, 2019

 

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The Clipper Round the World yachts left for their next leg from Fremantle to Seattle on Sunday afternoon and did a parade of sails in the inner harbour, where I took these photos.

The crew had been on R&R and yacht repair and maintenance at the Fremantle Sailing Club for a few weeks.

Roel Loopers

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CLIPPER YACHTS LEAVING FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle port, sailing, Uncategorized by freoview on December 21, 2019

 

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The yachts participating in the Clipper Round the World race will be leaving Fremantle tomorrow-Sunday, after staying at the Fremantle Sailing Club for a few weeks.

They will be doing a Parade of Sails in the inner harbour at 1pm, and after that man overboard exercises on the ocean.

Start of the next leg will be at 3pm near the North Mole, so go and have a look at the impressive sight of them all together.

Roel Loopers

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WESTPORT TASKFORCE LATEST REPORT ON NEW CONTAINER PORT OPTIONS

 

The Westport Taskforce has just released their latest report about the options for a probable new container port near Kwinana, so I copied and paste it for you all:

 

Changes to Westport’s shortlist

Westport announced its shortlist of five port options in August 2019. The shortlist, which was the result of the first multi-criteria analysis (MCA-1) on the long-list, consisted of three stand-alone Kwinana options and two shared Fremantle/Kwinana options.

After the release of Westport Beacon 7: Westport’s shortlist, the order and cataloguing of the options (which are now A-E) was subsequently changed for the purposes of MCA-2 and to allow the options to be re-assessed with a clean slate regardless of how they were ranked in MCA-1.

Since then, the Westport Taskforce has gathered information to enable a deeper understanding of how each option performs against the MCA-2 criteria.As work for the MCA-2 got underway, it became evident that two sub-options (Option D2 and Option E2) were required to allow separate assessment of a staged transition from the shared port options (Options D and E) to a stand-alone port in Kwinana. The transition Options D2 and E2 did not form part of MCA-1, but have now been added to the shortlist to enable investigations into infrastructure staging, timing and cost implications.

The addition of the two transition options highlights the complexity of Westport’s work and how the project has remained flexible to adapt to new inputs as required. This ensures that the best outcome can be achieved.The revised shortlist of options assessed in MCA-2 are summarised in Table 1 below. Options A to E are all end-state options, while Options D2 and E2 are transition options that both lead to Option B as the end-state.

Table 1: Summary of shortlist options assessed in MCA-2OptionDescription Operation

Option A KwinanaCockburn Sound North (vicinity Rowley Road) narrow island port with intermodal operations at Latitude 32End-state

Option B KwinanaCockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) conventional land-backed portEnd-state

Option C KwinanaCockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road)conventional island portEnd-state

Option D Fremantle and Kwinana. Unmodified Fremantle Port shared with Cockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) medium conventional land-backed portEnd-state

Option D2 Fremantle and Kwinana. Unmodified Fremantle Port shared with Cockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) medium land-backed port transitioning to Cockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) land-backed port (Option B)Transition to Option B

Option E Fremantle and Kwinana. Slightly modified Fremantle Port shared with Cockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) medium conventional land-backed port with Blue HighwayEnd-state

Option E2 Fremantle and Kwinana. Slightly modified Fremantle Port shared with Cockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) medium land-backed port with Blue Highway, transitioning to Cockburn Sound South (vicinity Anketell Road) land-backed port (Option B)Transition to Option B

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FREO’S PRINCESS BACK IN PORT

Posted in city of fremantle, cruiseliner, fremantle port, tourism, travel, Uncategorized by freoview on November 27, 2019

 

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The Sun Princess is back in her home port of Fremantle. It is always a great sight to see one of the majestic cruiseliners in Fremantle, so welcome to all the passengers and crew.

Roel Loopers

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HIGH STREET PROJECT SECURITY WASTE OF MONEY

Posted in city of fremantle, freight, fremantle port, state government, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on September 13, 2019

 

One has to wonder why Mainroads is wasting so much money on having 24/7 security guards at the Fremantle High Street Upgrade project. They are now ‘protecting’ bare soil as the homes have been demolished so there is nothing to vandalise or steal.

The formers occupants have stated they will not protest as a deal was done about planting thousands of sapplings to compensate for the loss of trees.

Roel Loopers

 

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CONNECTING FREO’S FUTURE TO THE PAST

 

I enjoy talking with architects, city planners and developers about Fremantle’s future and have found it educational and inspiring to have discussions with City of Fremantle heritage coordinator architect Alan Kelsall about how we should try to grow Fremantle.

Alan and I agree that in general the Fremantle community recognises that the need for regeneration of the city is necessary and that it is desirable if done well: if it is managed, planned and implemented in ways that reinforce and sustain the sense of Fremantle’s distinctiveness embodied in it, such as the rich mix of built heritage and unique urban character.

However, without broad, long-term public support and commitment to the planning vision for Fremantle it is unlikely to be successful. As a community we therefore need to have a clear understanding of what we mean when we try to articulate it. The ultimate outcome will set the standard for good design within Freo’s heritage areas and getting it right is essential to securing the future of our heritage buildings.

Let’s consider Fremantle’s history and what it means in the context of future growth of our city. Fremantle was developed as a port town and a centre of trade, and for most of its history it was prosperous and acknowledged as the second city in the metro area. That underscores the city’s distinct character and its rich heritage.

The prosperity of Fremantle encouraged the construction of its present heritage buildings. These developments were not simply utilitarian or profit based, but showed a desire to display a mix of business confidence and civic pride. That is probably why these buildings have a quality that people continue to find attractive, and why most people in our community believe it is worth conserving them, not only as memorial of the past but also as exemplars of successful, high quality architecture, urban design and city planning.

Fremantle had buildings with a strong association with the working port, but also buildings that provided a diverse mix of uses. These included schools, shops, places to work and socialise, etc. which people living in its densely populated catchment could reach on foot or by public transport. It is what we now consider to be an example of sustainable urban design.

Fremantle Port played a primary role in Freo’s success and its distinct character due to the facts that processing, storage and distribution of export and import commodities took place in buildings located near the harbour. It created the mutual interdependence between the port and the city that generated and sustained our port city character.

However this pattern of beneficial evolution changed in 1969 with the introduction of containerisation, which caused profound changes in Fremantle, not only because it changed the way in which ships were loaded and unloaded but also because storage and distribution of export and import commodities no longer took place near the harbour. These changes completely severed the earlier mutual supporting interdependencies between the harbour, city centre and surrounding residential suburbs. The changes impacted not only on shipping and its associated industries but also affected the commercial, retail, social and residential vitality of the city. In addition it caused deterioration of the quality of public areas and less appreciation of the worth of its heritage buildings.

It is obviously impossible, and probably not even desirable, to try to replicate the primary role played by the port in the past, but it is possible, through new higher density mixed-use development located between Victoria Quay and Kings Square, within reach of the railway station, to reproduce the type of mutually supporting interdependencies that used to exist between the port and the city centre. For this to be successful though it demands that development is guided by integrated strategic planning that is inspired, but not limited, by the past to create the conditions of genuine everyday activities, that should come as a result of more people living and working and enjoying social leisure time in all its diversity within the same area.

It is important to recognise that the role residential development on appropriate sites in the CBD can play is crucial to generating the vitality and resilience needed to cope with future problems and to adjust to changing circumstances. A fundamental benefit of regenerating and revitalising the area in this way is that it would promote positive change and would contribute to re-establishing Fremantle’s city centre as the heart of the community, which has already started with the Kings Square redevelopment project.

If Fremantle’s heritage is not managed carefully because it is considered to be too hard it will be at risk of being lost and with this its potential to enrich the city in ways that give a sense of distinctiveness, meaning and quality to the places in which people live and work, as well as the sense of destination that attracts people to Freo and makes them want to come and spend time in our city and thus contribute to secure its future.

It is a huge challenge to get it right, but with respectful dialogue between developers, city planners and the community we can all positively contribute to Fremantle’s progress and future.

Roel Loopers

A huge thank you to Alan Kelsall for his collaboration with constructing this article!

 

 

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