Freo's View

FREMANTLE BUDGETS FOR ROAD IMPROVEMENTS

 

The City of Fremantle budget for 2018-19 includes a $2.5 million program to improve and maintain roads. Major resurfacing works have been scheduled for sections along Hampton Road, Rockingham Road, Lefroy Road, Marine Terrace and High Street.

There will also be works to improve road safety for motorists and pedestrians along Stirling Highway, Marine Terrace and McCabe Street.

All of the road millings that are dug up as part of the resurfacing program will be collected and re-used in other city projects, like the upgraded Recycling Centre and the new Cappuccino Strip carpark.

By using recycled materials the City does not have to buy new limestone road base and does not have to pay to dispose of the stripped road material in landfill, so it delivers a significant saving.

The upgrade of a second section of South Terrace in South Fremantle is also included in the budget, with work on the first ‘node’ at the intersections of South Terrace, Little Lefroy Lane and Sydney Street beginning later this month.

The location of a second ‘node’ is still to be confirmed subject to more community feedback. It involves reducing the width of the road, changing the colour of the road surface and widening the footpath, as well as adding new paving, street furniture and trees.

The changes will encourage drivers to slow down, make it safer for people to cross the street and will increase the amount of alfresco space.The works are designed to create a more pedestrian-friendly environment and will also allow the removal of the much debated and disliked temporary speed humps in that section of South Terrace.

Interesting to note that the budget also includes $25,000 to develop a concept plan to create a new town square in front of the Fremantle Railway Station and upgrade Queen Street

A new town square and the relocation of the bus port has been debated for very many years but the reluctance of the Public Transport Authority to move the bus port further east means the idea has had a few plans drawn up but was never realised. Why there is need for yet another costly concept plan I do not understand. I won’t hold my breath that we will see any changes there soon.

Roel Loopers

TRANSPERTH BUSSES TAKE SHOPPERS’ PARKING

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, parking, public transport, Uncategorized by freoview on June 20, 2018

 

busses

 

It is disappointing when one wants to take advantage of the free before 11am parking for residents in the City of Fremantle when Transperth busses use local streets near the Woolstores shopping centre as overflow parking spaces.

These five busses took up 17 car bays at 10am this morning. It’s not on!

Roel Loopers

GOLDEN MORNING AT FREO RAILWAY STATION

Posted in city of fremantle, photography, public transport, trains, Uncategorized by freoview on May 16, 2018

 

station

 

I had an early 6.30am catch up coffee with former Fremantle Councillor Dave Coggin at Il Cibo this morning. He is a man I greatly respect and really like and he is now working at the WA Premier’s Department.

When we walked out of the cafe Dave pointed at the railway station, saying “Look at that light!” I wandered over of course to take this stunning photo of it.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE PORT AND RAIL

Posted in fremantle, fremantle port, navy, public transport by freoview on March 14, 2017

 

It’s always an interesting view point to see a ship at berth in port straight behind the Fremantle railway station.

This one is the Canberra class amphibious assault ship and landing helicopter dock HMAS Adelaide.

Roel Loopers

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INFILL IS NOT GOOD EVERYWHERE

Posted in development, fremantle, housing, lifestyle, living, public transport, western australia by freoview on September 14, 2016

W.A. Planning Minister Donna Faragher’s statement that higher density is needed near train stations is not up to the high standards we expect of a Minister. Making broad sweeping statements is plain wrong and surely the state government in collaboration with local councils needs to find the best suitable areas near public transport to increase density and infill, instead of demanding higher density near all train stations.

Older unique character suburbs like Fremantle, Claremont and Subiaco, etc. would be destroyed if we just planted highrise buildings close to the train stations, while in other newer suburbs high density might actually improve the amenity.

Governments have this strange attitude that change needs to happen everywhere instead of targeting suitable suburbs for higher density living. It would also help if the state actually supported local councils which want to increase infill by improving public transport corridors and not just along the railway line where most older suburbs are.

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE BUS REFLECTION

Posted in fremantle, photography, public transport, western australia by freoview on June 26, 2016

reflection 1

 

A Fremantle photo that does not require an explanation.

Roel Loopers

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PUBLIC TRANSPORT PRIORITY FOR SOUTHERN CORRIDOR

Posted in city of cockburn, city of fremantle, public transport, western australia by freoview on June 10, 2016

Looking at all the development and planned development along the coast just south of Fremantle I wonder what plans the WA State Government has for public transport in the area, as the high number of new residents there, who will  commute to work, will have a substantial impact on Fremantle roads in the near future.

Cockburn Road and Hampton Road are already congested during peak hours and new commuters using those roads will make that worse. South Fremantle is already suffering from too many vehicles using Douro Road, South Terrace and Marine Parade, so good public transport strategies need to be in place well before all the new residents move in. Rapid bus or lightrail along that corridor would be great and could connect central Fremantle to central Cockburn, so maybe it is time for the two cities to start collaborating and planning for this together.

Recent figures show that substantially fewer people use public transport and more and more the freeways and other roads to commute to and from work, so long-term efficient transport planning should be a priority for this part of the metropolitan area.

In many European cities public transport is often in place well before housing development starts, and trams and busses are running when people move in. We should follow that example and not plan public transport as an after thought.

Roel Loopers

COOGEE LIGHTRAIL ESSENTIAL TO SUCCESS

Posted in cockburn, development, fremantle, public transport, TRAFFIC by freoview on April 29, 2015

Short-sighted piecemeal planning seems to be very much what Western Australia is all about, both at state and local levels. The planned Coogee Coast development south of Fremantle’s South Beach, that includes the heritage significant former South Fremantle Power Station, is another example of non-integrated planning.

While Cockburn Mayor Logan Howlett and Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt say that the influx of some 12,000 residents would make lightrail the perfect form of public transport, Lands Minister Tony Redman stated that a bus priority corridor along Hampton Road and through the new development would be adequate. Who is he kidding?!

We constantly hear from State Government experts that higher density living along transport corridors is the way forward for fast-growing Perth, but a bus service that would accommodate 10,000 commuters during rush hour each day is just a ridiculous and outdated proposition. It would require some 200 busses to drive from Coogee to the Fremantle train station between 6.30-8.30 am to shift that many people. 200 busses in 120 minutes along Hampton Road? YES Minister.

Why can’t the cost for lightrail be included in the massive development, so that the developers who are going to make millions from it actually pay for most of the transport infrastructure required. Imagine that same light rail also looping past Fiona Stanley Hospital, and the Murdoch and Curtin universities and we might start seeing the light on how to deal with traffic congestions and the associated air pollution.

Roel Loopers

PUBLIC TRANSPORT DECLINE DEMANDS INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS

Posted in city of fremantle, public transport, western australia by freoview on January 21, 2015

The figures reported on-line WA Today on the decline in the use of trains shows that an integrated approach is needed to attract more people to public transport and to attack the huge traffic challenges of the Perth metropolitan region. There is little gain in small local councils like Fremantle stubbornly wanting to minimise motorvehicle traffic and for the State Government to have the Direction 2031 for higher denisty living near public transport corridors and railway stations, when the community is reluctant to use what is provided. The declining public transport figures create even less incentive for the federal and state governments to start paying for public transport infrastructure like lightrail and rapid bus routes, no matter how often the City of Fremantle bleats about it.

According to WAToday there were nearly 740,000 less trips in the five-months period from June to November last year, when compared to the previous years. That is huge!

It matters little if the reasons are overcrowding, safety, comfort, paid parking, not enough parking near stations, or more expensive tickets. Fact is that in the fasted-growing population state fewer people are now using public transport. That is not a trend we want to see continue!

Roel Loopers

DEALING WITH REALITY

Posted in fremantle, public transport, western australia by freoview on December 13, 2014

Many things work in theory and on paper but when put into practise reality often forces changes. Such appears to be the case with the WA State Government’s desire to increase residential density near train stations, with the announcement that the government won’t allow residential development within 500 metres of the new Forrestfield train station because of concerns about noise and vibration. Residents near the new Butler train station have been complaining about vibration and noise since the station was opened.

The upside of paid car parking at railway stations is that more people ride their bicycles to the stations and that 15,000 cyclists have registered to use the secure bike shelters. Only 0.7 percent of train passengers ride their bikes to stations in the Perth metro area.

In Fremantle we need to learn the lessons from other cities around the world that increased bike use means we need to supply more bicycle parking facilities.

Roel Loopers

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