Freo's View

FREO AGE FRIENDLY WORKING GROUP

 

The City of Fremantle has established an Age Friendly City Working Group, which comprises of age care specialists and members of the Fremantle community.

The members of the committee are Steve Waddingham of Alzeimer’s WA, Stuart Tomlinson of the Fremantle Multicultural Centre, Julie Ray of Amana Living, and Leah Gray of the Hilton Foley Village and Souther Cross Care.

Community members are Betty Garlett, Sylvia Lang, Cathy Hall, Ella Peaty, Rob Fittock and Roel Loopers.

During the last election campaign in October voters expressed a need for a ‘circle of elders’ to cater for the fast ageing population, and Fremantle Council acknowledged that this was a good idea.

Roel Loopers

MENTAL HEALTH WEEK-WE ALL CAN HELP!

Posted in city of fremantle, communication, community, health, mental health, Uncategorized by freoview on October 8, 2018

 

Mental health week.

 

Mental health problems have been increasing for years now and affect young and old people, ale and female.

Being aware, asking R U OKAY? and caring and sharing better will all help. Don’t take your loved ones, friends and family for granted, make sure they are okay!

Roel Loopers

FREO’S VIEW IS NINE YEARS OLD

 

In October 2009, so nine years ago, I decided to start this Freo’s View blog, and what a labour of love it has become.

I daily wander and drive the streets of our lovely city to look for things to photograph and write about, and I attend most Fremantle Council and council committee meetings, precinct and community consultation meetings, etc.

In the nine years of Freo’s View I have published 9,200 blog posts and close to 30,000 comments by the public, so the blog has become an important community forum.

I started the blog as a community service and don’t make any money from it, because the integrity of the blog is more important than trying to make money through advertising.

There is no political agenda, no agenda whatsoever! I am only interested in getting the best for Freo, the city I love and am very passionate about.

If I know something happens in Fremantle I will blog about it, so keep me informed about new ventures, events, concerts, art exhibitions, etc.etc. Just email roel.loopers@iinet.net.au.

Thank you all for your support, and keep those comments coming!

Roel Loopers

WE LIVE ON A VERY LONELY PLANET

 

loneliness

 

We live in a world where we can communicate with anyone on earth within seconds, be that via computer, mobile phone or other means, so why is it when most of us connect many times a day on social media that so many of us feel lonely, according to a massive survey by England’s BBC.

The BBC started the Loneliness Experience on Valentine’s Day this year and 55,000 people from around the world responded to it.

The graph above by the BBC shows that it is not just old(er) people who feel lonely often, but surprisingly the top group is those between 16-24 years of age.

Depression and suicide have been increasing in the western world, as people feel unwanted, not appreciated, bullied and not loved. Social media contacts don’t replace touch, a hug, people who really care and share, and to cuddle up with someone you trust when you feel down.

We live in a society where many of us have become cynical of our political and spiritual leaders, and that has created the ME society, where others are not much of a priority for many people. We all long to be loved and cared for, and it all starts with respect, courtesy and sharing.

It appears to me from the above graph that we are not okay and as a community we need to make better efforts connecting with each other. R U OKAY?

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on WE LIVE ON A VERY LONELY PLANET

SOUTH FREMANTLE TRAFFIC CALMING CONTROVERSY

Posted in city of fremantle, communication, community, local government, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on September 29, 2018

 

traffic 1

 

The first stage of traffic calming along South Terrace in South Fremantle is now completed near the intersection of Little Lefroy Road.

Footpaths have been widened, new trees planted, new benches installed, and four of the hated speedhumps have been removed.

But there is already criticism on the South Fremantle Precinct Facebook page with people complaining about the power lines still being above ground, alleged shoddy workmanship, and that traffic would now divert onto other roads and become a nuisance there.

All these issues were addressed during the lengthy and thorough community consultation process, and we should acknowledge that the whole process started at the request of local residents who wanted a safer environment for pedestrian and cyclists, and who complained that entering South Terrace from side streets was a hazard.

Most councils require local property owners to pay a substantial percentage of putting power under ground, and that was not supported at the community consultation sessions.

It is common knowledge that impatient motorists will always try to find alternative routes when they feel that traffic calming slows them down too much, but South Terrace was considered more of a residential area that warranted traffic calming and slower speeds than Hampton Road and Marine Terrace.

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on SOUTH FREMANTLE TRAFFIC CALMING CONTROVERSY

HAVE YOUR SAY ON NEW LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT

 

WA Local government Minister David Templeman has an article in today’s West Australian in which he encourages the community to get involved in the review of the local government act and make suggestions on how we can improve our local councils and administrations.

Here some information from the government website about it:

Phase one: modernising local government

Phase one of the review focuses on four key areas:

  • Meeting community expectations of standards, ethics and performance
  • Meeting public expectations for accountability, including gift disclosures
  • Electronic availability of information
  • Building capacity through introducing administrative efficiencies

Local governments and the community were invited to have their say throughout the consultation period. The phase one discussion paper was released on 8 November 2017 and public consultation closed on 9 March 2018.

Phase two: delivering for communities

​Commencing in 2018, phase two will ensure local governments are positioned to deliver for the community by examining:

  • Elections
  • Community consultation and engagement
  • Integrated Planning and Reporting
  • Financial management
  • Rates and charges
  • Beneficial organisations (council controlled organisations)
  • Local laws
  • Interventions
  • Administrative efficiencies

What you need to know

What is the Local Government Act review?

The Local Government Act review will introduce changes that will modernise the Act and ensure that local governments are positioned to deliver for the community into the future. The review is being undertaken in two phases. The first consultation paper released on 8 November 2017.

Phase two of the review is now underway.

Local government is real grassroots government so we should all take an active part in trying to improve the performance of our elected members and staff, and get greater transparency and better communication, so have your say!

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on HAVE YOUR SAY ON NEW LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT

THE SPEAKERS AT THE FIRST TEDx FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, communication, community, fibonacci centre, Uncategorized by freoview on August 15, 2018

 

 

The first ever TEDx Fremantle will be held on September 16 from 2-9pm at the Drillhall of Notre Dame University. Tickets are on sale now so go to the website or Facebook page to order.

The theme of the TEDx Fremantle day is Perception vs Reality and the speakers are:

Dr Noel Nannup

Dr Moira Clay – Happy Healthy Children Free of Brain Cancer 

Tammy Bux – It’s OK to Drop the Mask

Dr Sam Baron – The End of Time

Dr Paola Magni – When Justice Flies

James Eggleston – Power Ledger

Dr Emily Bird – The Antidote to Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics

Anneka Pearton – Love thy Piano

Byron Joel – Regenerative Agriculture 

James Wickham – Don’t Judge a Book by its Cover

Comments Off on THE SPEAKERS AT THE FIRST TEDx FREMANTLE

FREMANTLE OVAL PRECINCT A GREAT OPPORTUNITY

 

Integrated into the heart of Fremantle, the vision for the Fremantle Oval Precinct is to re-establish and offer an active venue for sport, community, cultural and health pursuits.

Work on creating a concept for Fremantle Oval and the surrounding areas is underway with the City of Fremantle having established a Steering Group and a Reference Group.

The Steering Group consists of three directors of the City, the CEO of the South Metro Health Service and the Manager City Design and Projects of CoF.

The Reference Group is very large with three Elected Members,  the Area Manager Infrastructure of South Metro Health, a representative from the Department of Local Government, Sport and Culture, The CEOs of the South and East Fremantle football clubs, the President of the Fremantle District Cricket Club, the CEO of the Fremantle Chamber of Commerce, a representative of the University of Notre Dame, and three managers of the City of Fremantle. WOW, they must have veeeery looooong meetings so that everyone can have their say!

And what is it all about?

1. CONNECT WITH THE SURROUNDS

The precinct is re-established in a way that integrates its internal uses with one another as well as reconnecting the precinct into the fabric of the city centre.

2. CONSOLIDATES A CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE

Develop and enhance the precinct in a manner that consolidates and increases sporting activities on the Oval as the primary use and as a Centre of Excellence for football, while respecting the heritage of the precinct.

3. BRINGS ADDED PUBLIC LIFE

Augment sporting uses at the venue with entertainment, cultural events and community activities that bring added public access and life to the precinct.

4. ENABLES REGENERATION AND INTEGRATION

Consolidate health activities on the hospital site; enabling regeneration and improved integration with the surrounding city.

5. IMPROVES PUBLIC ACCESS

Develop key perimeter sites that improve public accessibility and increase pedestrian activity at ground level, throughout the year.

6. BALANCES TRANSPORT ACCESS

Enable a balanced portfolio of transport access arrangements to the precinct.

and there is more:

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE

Provide Open, Green Space for a Healthy City

Ensure the precinct provides open and green spaces for access by city workers, residents and visitors.

Reveal and Visually Connect the Precinct

Key views, vistas and links are established, protected and celebrated.

BUILT FORM

Optimise Activity through Appropriately Scaled Development

Ensure development opportunities optimise activities / density through appropriate height, mass and setbacks.

Respond to the Environment

Seek excellence in design and aesthetics; develop in a fashion that is responsive to local environmental conditions and sustainability principles.

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL

Integrate into Fremantle’s Historic Urban Fabric

Where practical, extend the urban grid of the city into the precinct to improve legibility and urban integration, whilst acknowledging the historical informal and open nature of the precinct.

Celebrate Heritage and History

Understand, reveal, enhance and interpret the unique heritage attributes of the precinct and its context.

MOVEMENT AND TRANSPORT

Invite People In

Improve pedestrian access, permeability and sense of safety across the precinct and along adjoining streets.

Create Good Journeys

Enhance physical connections between the precinct, prison and town.

What appears to be missing are some creative people; architects, artists, placemakers, and also yet again no attempt to involve community groups from the beginning, so yet again they will have to be reactive and that often results in the groups being criticised for being negative.

When will they ever learn at local government that it is advantageous to involve members of the community from the very start because it means a lot less hassles when it comes to planning issues, etc.

The Fremantle Oval Precinct is a huge opportunity for the City of Fremantle and while they mention a time frame of 20-30 years for the development this one is more realistic and achievable than the South Quay development ideas.

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on FREMANTLE OVAL PRECINCT A GREAT OPPORTUNITY

FREMANTLE BUSINESSES AWARDED

Posted in chamber of commerce, city of fremantle, communication, community, Uncategorized by freoview on June 9, 2018

 

The 10th annual Fremantle Business Awards event was held at the Esplanade Hotel last night and THE WINNERS ARE:

Corporate Responsibility: Fremantle Foundation

Excellence in Hospitality: Esplanade Hotel and Kazoomies. Joint winners!

Excellence in Innovation: Black Swan Health

Excellence in Strategy, Marketing, Communications: Photography Project

Marine Industry Excellence: TAMS Group

Outstanding Community Event: Long Table Dinner (National Hotel, St Patrick’s, BID)

Outstanding New Business: Viewport Virtual Reality

Outstanding Personal Achievement: Amber Kane of Ellen Health

Retail Excellence: The Blue Budha

Sustainability Initiative: CleanSubSea

Tourism Excellence: Fremantle Prison

Business of the Year: Media on Mars

 

Congratulations to all of you!

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on FREMANTLE BUSINESSES AWARDED

INTERNET ACCESS MEANS INDEPENDENCE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

Posted in art, city of fremantle, communication, daada, disability, internet, Uncategorized by freoview on June 6, 2018

 

 

The beautiful hall of DADAA, the former Fremantle Boys School at Princess May Park, was packed full this morning for the launch of the CENTRE FOR ACCESSIBILITY  by Stephen Dawson MLC.

The CFA’s aim is to promote digital access for people with a disability. This is not about compliance, but about people!

A short video showed the major issues for disabled people when accessing the internet. “Every website has got too many words. Very difficult to find stuff” “You want my cash, make your website accessible”

Stephen Dawson MLC said the Centre for Accessibility was about effectively engaging with on-line content and that it needs to be stressed that it is about independence for people with a disability.

The on-line informations needs to be available to everyone, as every person has a unique contribution to make to the community. Abled people sometimes take for granted what others don’t have. It is about breaking down the barriers!

The first three targets to improve on-line information are local government, providers of disability services and arts organisations. Many others will no doubt follow and make their on-line content more accessible to disabled people, e.g. add captions to video content, provide a transcript for audio-only content such as podcasts, audio volume needs to be adjustable, when using audio alerts also provide the visual equivalent.

The former Chair person of DADAA Helen Errington gave a very insightful speech with a lot of humour. She was not impressed with the early 8.30am launch and suggested to take the A out and make it a lunch next time.

Access to the internet means independence for us, she said, as it enabled her to do on-line food shopping, socialise via Twitter and Facebook, do research, find tradespeople and services, etc.

We were isolated before the internet and going out is often an ordeal. “Through the internet the mountain has come to Mohammed. We just want to be included”

I believe the Centre for Accessibility is a significant step forward toward real equality. It is practical and achievable rather than tokenism. See: http://www.accessibility.org.au

Well done to all involved. This is a great initiative, so very disappointing that I did not see anyone from the City of Fremantle in the crowd.

Roel Loopers

 

Comments Off on INTERNET ACCESS MEANS INDEPENDENCE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

%d bloggers like this: