Freo's View

HIGH STREET UPGRADE IMPACT ON TREES

Posted in city of fremantle, environment, freight, fremantle ports, traffic, trees, Uncategorized by freoview on June 21, 2019

 

trees-on-high-street

MAINROADS has supplied the above graph to show how many trees will be saved and which ones will be lost for the Fremantle High Street Upgrade, which is anticipated to make the freight journey to Fremantle Port faster and easier.

Work is due to start in just a few months from now and will take some of the public golf course.

Roel Loopers

MOST TREES RETAINED AT HIGH STREET UPGRADE

 

MAINROADS has issued a statement concerning the preservation of trees at the Fremantle High Street Upgrade project, which I post in part below.

There is still no word if the City of Fremantle will receive land at Clontarf Hill in exchange for the loss of CoF land for the High Street Upgrade.

Since Commonwealth and State funding was received in May 2017, we have been working in partnership with the City of Fremantle to develop a concept plan that meets the key objective of improving safety on High Street, while minimising impacts to the surrounding environment – particularly established trees. These measures include:

Overall clearing footprint: There are 245 large trees in the project area between Carrington Street and Stirling

Highway. While earlier versions of this project would have required significant clearing, our final concept design retains at least 178 (or 72%) of these trees. 67 (28%) will be cleared.

Nesting hollows: No current or potential nesting hollows for black cockatoos or other species are impacted by the project.

Future potential breeding trees: 64 (of 245) trees within the project area are considered to be future potential breeding trees (there is no current evidence of breeding).

The project will retain at least 48 (75%) of these trees. 16 (25%) will be cleared.

Tuart trees: 31 trees within the project area are tuarts. We’ve changed our design to save at least 13 of these tuarts. This includes specimens close to the Fremantle Netball Centre estimated to be between 40 and 50 years old.

Design changes: The project will provide a tree-lined median between the eastbound and westbound carriageways. While providing an attractive gateway into the city, this measure allows 28 trees to be preserved.

Landscaping and Urban Design: We have developed a Landscape and Urban Design Framework and specified a high standard of urban design for the project through consultation with local stakeholders including the City of Fremantle and the local community. The detailed development of the urban design will involve a coordinated team of urban designers, landscape architects, a public artist and public arts coordinator, and will include further consultation with local stakeholders. The detailed landscaping plan comprises soft landscaping, involving extensive planting and revegetation with species appropriate to the local area. The planting work will be done by a specialist contractor in the first winter following construction completion.

Roel Loopers

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ANGST ABOUT NEW WATER PIPES FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, hospitality, retail, traders, traffic, Uncategorized, water by freoview on May 30, 2019

 

There is quite a bit of apprehension about the Pipes for Fremantle works which are scheduled by the Water Corporation to start in June in the Fremantle CBD.

Traders and Council staff are concerned about the inevitable impact the road works will have with road closures, accessibility problems and loss of parking bays, so what can be done to make it as good as possible?

Of course the first that was considered was free parking, but it is doubtful it would have a tangible impact and would be more of a goodwill gesture than anything else.

How can Watercorp make it any better because there is day-time and night-time trading in the inner city, so moving the essential renewal of the pipes to the evenings is not a solution. Day and night work would make the project faster and roads would be closed for a shorter time, but is that practical?

To put it bluntly, without wanting to create panic, there are no easy solutions. The work has to be done or we might end up with water mains bursting and flooding and other damage, so our struggling traders will have to cop it again. I hope for them that financial compensation is an option because there is little doubt that the water pipes work will impact on their businesses.

Streets for renewal include:

  • Bannister Street, between Pakenham Street to Market Street.
  • Collie Street, between Marine Terrace and South Terrace.
  • Essex Lane, between Collie Street and Essex Street.
  • Essex Street, between Marine Terrace and South Terrace.
  • High Street, between Little High Street and Market Street.
  • Leake Street, between Pakenham Street and Market Street.
  • Marine Terrace, between Cliff Street and Suffolk Street, and Howard Street and Price Street.
  • Market Street, between High Street and Bannister Street
  • Nairn Street, between Pakenham Street and Market Street.
  • Norfolk Street, between Marine Terrace and South Terrace
  • Pakenham Street, between Collie Street and Leake Street
  • South Terrace, between Bannister Street and Norfolk Street

We estimate this construction work will take now place between June and November 2019.

Streets no longer included in this package of work include:

  • Henry Street, between Marine Terrace and Phillimore Street.
  • Pakenham Street, Leake Street to Phillimore Street.
  • Phillimore Street, between Henry Street and Pakenham Street.
  • Short Street, between Pakenham Street and Market Street

Renewal of the water mains on these streets will be completed at a later date.

Roel Loopers

 

FUN SOUTH FREMANTLE PAVEMENT PARTY

Posted in city of fremantle, community, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on May 8, 2019

 

May 9. Street Party Sth Freo

The second South Fremantle PAVEMENT PARTY will be held tomorrow, Thursday May 9 on the corner of South Terrace and Little Lefroy Road from 5.30-7.30pm.

Come along with board games, instruments, couches, beanbags, kids, dogs, etc. and meet your fellow South Freo community members.

The Pavement Party had a fantastic ambience last years, so join us all!

Roel Loopers

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HAMPTON ROAD TRAFFIC ‘IMPROVEMENTS’ COUNCIL COMMENTS

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, schools, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on April 23, 2019

 

Fremantle Councillors have been commenting on Facebook about the article I published yesterday on Freo’s View about the traffic ‘improvements’ at the South Fremantle Hampton Road/Scott Street intersection.

It is rather strange that Councillors don’t want to comment on my blog but do respond to my blog posts on FB rather than at the source.Only a few readers of Freo’s View connect with me on Facebook so they are missing out on the conversation, so I decided to copy and paste the FB comments and publish them here.

It is clear that there must be an understanding at the City of Fremantle that they want to control what is being said in the media and social media, but it makes little sense to me that they engage on Facebook but not on this Fremantle blog.

Hannah Fitzhardinge Roel the residents who live along the southbound side of Hampton Rd were finding it almost impossible to get safely in and out of their driveways when there was a right turn there. Tricky to make everyone happy!

Pip Sawyer Hannah Fitzhardinge well youve made a lot of people mad
I stopped using that shopping centre completely in late March. And thats sad because the IGA had put in a lot of improvements

Hannah Fitzhardinge Pip Sawyer it was a tough call but it didn’t seem right (to the majority of Councillors) to make people’s access to their homes so dangerous. I still use those shops…

Roel Loopers People who live along main roads often have huge difficulties exiting their drive way. The question is if the comfort of a few is more important than the safety of many.

Sam Wainwright Hannah Fitzhardinge and Roel Loopers

The main safety problem with “Option 1” was that retention of right turns from Hampton Rd into Scott St causes drivers who want to continue south to suddenly pull into the bus lane to get around vehicles waiting to turn right.

This certainly poses a hazard for people people pulling in and out of their driveways in the vicinity. However the *main* problem is the danger it creates for people at the adjacent pedestrian crossing. The cars queuing to turn into Scott obscure vision of crossing pedestrians for motorist that try to pass them by lurching into the bus lane. Similarly the pedestrian on seeing a stopped car in the centre lane can’t be expected to anticipate another vehicle travelling at 60 km/h to suddenly appear in the bus lane when they looked and saw no bus coming. This visibility problem is even more of an issue with children.

In their report the officers proposed proposed Option 1 not because they thought it was superior, but because they didn’t think council would have an appetite for blocking right the turn into Scott. They confirmed in discussion that they actually preferred Option 2 (as pictured in your blog post).

The road treatment we went with is not perfect. Inevitably it will deflect some vehicle movements down other streets making them busier, plus it has its own inconvenience. You have to play that balancing act whenever you block a street or put in traffic calming somewhere. Conversely it will make it safer and easier for people on bicycles to cross Hampton at Scott.

I would actually prefer that Scott and Hampton be signalised thus allowing motorists to turn right and giving pedestrians priority when crossing. However there were two issues with this. Main Roads won’t fund a crossing guardian for kids if it’s signalised and they did not want to help pay for traffic lights at this location anyway. From memory the design we opted for will make it easier and cheaper to signalise the intersection sometime in the future.

In that context I remain firmly of the view that Option 2 was the right decision. I put pedestrian safety over the inconvenience of motorists having to travel a bit further down to Lloyd St.

Hannah Fitzhardinge Sam Wainwright well said!

At least now Freo’s View readers can also see what Councillors Fitzhardinge and Wainwright have to say about it. Democracy at work.

Roel Loopers

SOUTH FREMANTLE ROAD ‘IMPROVEMENTS’ NO ONE WANTED

Posted in accidents, cars, children, city of fremantle, family, local government, schools, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on April 22, 2019

 

road 1

road 2

 

Traffic ‘improvements’ no one wanted have started in South Fremantle at the Hampton Road and Scott Street intersection. Right-hand turns are now permanently disallowed there.

The right-turn ban out of the shopping centre car park at Scott Street remains and that is also nonsensical because it means all cars going north need to exit at Lloyd Street where most of the issues are, but the exit there will somehow be improved as part of this expensive and useless exercise by the City of Fremantle.

Improving the crosswalk for students and parents of the Beaconsfield Primary School and local users was the aim of the extensive community consultation, but a handful of Councillors decided they knew better than the locals, their own staff and Mainroads experts and decided to do it their way.

I use the intersection several times a day on foot and in the car, so I am very familiar with the issues.

What a shame their is no higher authority to go to to get this stupidity overruled.

This and other matters will be discussed tomorrow, Tuesday April 23 at the South Fremantle Precinct meeting at The Local from 6.30pm.

Roel Loopers

FREO HIGH STREET UPGRADE START STILL SIX MONTHS AWAY

 

 

The Western Australian Environmental Protection Authority-EPA– have approved the Fremantle High Street upgrade along the Fremantle golf course and at the Stirling Highway intersection.

The upgrade is planned to make road freight traffic to and from Fremantle Port easier and faster and will require widening of High Street at the golf course, removal of Tuart trees, and demolishing the FERN site and the old cottages, occupied by squatters currently.

But it is not going to happen in March, as was initially planned, because the minister will still have to sign off on the A-Class land excision.

At present it is anticipated that contractors for the City of Fremantle will start on the demolition of the cottages in July/August and Mainroads WA will then start on the road widening in September/October.

Environmentalists have warned they will try to stop the removal of some of the Tuart trees, so that could become interesting. It is important to note here that the reason the road is partly put on the golf course fairway is to preserve as many trees as possible on the new median strip.

A land swap suggested by Fremantle Council, where the City would get some of the land at Clontarf Hill in exchange for the land taken away from the golf course, is being considered but Mainroads have not yet made a decision on that, so stay tuned.

Roel Loopers

TRAFFIC DEATH TRAUMA PHOTO EXHIBITION AT PSAS

Posted in accidents, art, city of fremantle, exhibition, photography, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on March 10, 2019

 

guy-poster

 

My mate Perth photographer Guy Vinciguerra drove all over Australia to photograph the roadside shrines people create in memory of loved ones who lost their life in a road accident. Guy drove 40,000 km and it took him five years to shoot the photos for this exhibition.

His powerful and sensitive images will be on show at PS Art Studios in Fremantle’s Pakenham Street from Friday. The opening of Sacred Places is on Friday March 15 at 6pm.

PSAS writes:

Guy Vinciguerra’s images expose to our view sites of memorial usually seen only fleetingly as we speed by on our sure and confident way to our destination. Glimpsed occasionally here and there in the landscape, in this space they are brought together in an evocation of what Paul Virilio conceptualised as a ‘museum of the accident’, a gathering of instances that present evidence of the inherent failures of the technologies of our lives, as opposed to the lauding of our efforts at progress. They are individual, personal representations of a communal trauma particular to this era of fossil-fuelled technologies, an era in itself passing. The Sacred has been defined as something ‘set aside’ and dedicated, a discrete fixed point where meaning gains coherence.

In this space lies the opportunity to pause and to contemplate these memorials in their multitude and pathos, saturated with colour and paradox, raw sorrows opened to the public gaze. We are invited to look, sanctioned to be voyeurs. Every feature is in sharp focus, like the heightened reality experienced in moments of shock, perceptions are intense with detail. The sumptuous colour contrasts with the greys and greens of ground and landscape. We are confronted with the juxtaposition of beauty and the banality of objects, of ordinary peoples’ lives shattered by an extraordinary event. The Sacred is unifying, it represents the shared interests of a community, it can inhere in things, in symbols and objects, and in places as power and resistance. These images are Sacred Places.

While I highly recommend to come and view the exhibition I am  less impressed with the over the top info blurb and pretentious writing in the catalogue. There is nothing pretentious about Guy Vinciguerra or his photos, which are straight forward and powerful in their own right.

Roel Loopers

NORTH FREMANTLE COMMUNITY NOT HAPPY WITH GROWING PORT

 

The North Fremantle community is not happy that Fremantle Council is officially supporting a continuation of a working Fremantle Port.

Ann Forma and Gerard MacGill of the North Fremantle Community Association have published a paper scrutinising facts and criticising new plans and the lack of consideration given to the impact a growing container port will have on local residents.

Forma and MacGill question why Fremantle Council have pre-empted the outcome of the Westport Taskforce by stating it wants “To retain and if possible expand this economic activity into the future, the inner harbour should be retained in the long term as an operating port.”

A Port study in 1991 already asked if the port will still be adequate in 30 years, and if not if it could be adapted or should a new port be constructed, and if so, where?

In 2005 Fremantle Ports’ preferred future was an overflow container port on an artificial island at Navel Base, south of Henderson.

The leases for DP World and Patrick’s at North Quay expire at the end of June this year, according to the NFCA report, but the preferred option of Fremantle Ports is to sign new seven-year leases with the stevedores, which would have the option of two future seven-year period extensions, so for a total of 21 years, ending in 2040.

The North Fremantle Community Association  paper states that the North Fremantle community paid a big price over the last 50 years with the ever-increasing port activities, but that the social and environmental impacts have never been properly assessed.

Roel Loopers

The NFCA report in full here:

Fremantle Ports Container Terminal History and Future

MAJOR WATER WORKS FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, events, state government, traffic, Uncategorized, water by freoview on February 20, 2019

 

new water mains for fremantle

 

Anyone planning any significant outdoor events in the Fremantle CBD between April and December this year should be aware that the Watercorporation is planning major works in many streets in that period.

Watercorporation are going to renew 4.2 kilometres of water mains pipes in these streets: Market, High, South Tce, Essex, Leake, Marine Tce, Norfolk, Nairn, Phillimore, Pakenham, Short, Henry, Bannister.

This might well have an impact on traffic flow around town and for some businesses.

Check it out on their website and ask any questions you might have about disruptions, etc. Go to: http://www.watercorporation.com.au/pipesforfremantle

Roel Loopers

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