Freo's View

ALL ABOUT FREMANTLE STATISTICS

Posted in city of fremantle, community, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on January 17, 2018

 

Some interesting statistics from the City of Fremantle:

Over 300 000 unique users viewed almost two million pages on the Fremantle Story website throughout the year.

Community Safety Officers receive over 10 000 calls for assistance each year. The major achievement was the ability of the team to maintain a consistent level of ranger type services while transitioning into a new business model.

The City’s revenue from parking infringements is approximately $1.8 million.

For the period reported in the 2016-17 annual report, the City had forty (40) employees whose salary exceeded $100 000.

Of these employees

  •   five (5) had a salary between $100 000 and $110 000
  •   ten (10) had a salary between $110 000 and $120 000
  •   four (4) had a salary between $120 000 and $130 000
  •   five (5) had a salary between $130 000 and $140 000
  •   seven (7) had a salary between $140 000 and $150 000
  •   one (1) had a salary between $150 000 and $160 000
  •   three (3) had a salary between $160 000 and $170 000
  •   one (1) had a salary between $190 000 and $200 000
  •   three (3) had a salary between $210 000 and $220 000
  •   and one (1) had a salary between $260 000 and $270 000

A total of 472 019 people visited the leisure centre during 2016-17, an increase of 18 700 from the previous year.

The Fremantle International Street Arts Festival had record crowds of over 150 000 people across the Easter weekend, with the city’s streets, historic laneways and public spaces bursting with life as performers transformed the city into a world stage with 13 performance pitches (with Good Friday performances for the first time). It was the busiest Friday, Saturday and Sunday ever recorded in Fremantle.

The event consisted of 34 international acts and 10 Australian acts. In addition, WAHonk! Fest consisted of 91 performers (2 international, 24 interstate and 65 from WA). Over 150 individual performances took place over the five days with acts coming from Australia, UK, USA, Canada, Lithuania, Japan, Belgium, Spain, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Sweden.

Exhibitions attracted a total audience of 69 130 to 17 exhibitions presented over seven separate exhibition periods. FAC presented, for the second time, Revealed, a state government annual project that brings emerging Aboriginal artists and art centres from across WA together for workshops, public talks, an exhibition and an art market. The market turned over $430 000 with all proceeds going back to the artists and art centres.

The Fremantle Visitor Centre attracted 84 962 people through the doors and $546 774 in sales and $74 476 commission on those sales. Two thousand nine hundred and forty-five responses were provided for general information and business enquiries and 12 635 brochures were distributed for 19 conferences held in our region.

FVC had 137 446 unique visitors to the FVC website (visitfremantle.com.au) and have 20 369 Facebook followers. The centre provided opportunities for 215 businesses to advertise their business either through the visitfremantle.com.au website or brochure racking.

The customer service team serviced over 55 079 phone contacts, over 21 500 face-to-face enquiries and answered 21 294 emails.

During this period the team created 15 262 customer requests for service that were directed to the appropriate city officer, which is an increase of 70%.

339 logged requests for service were completed online via the City website.

 

PERCENTAGE FOR HERITAGE IMPORTANT FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in architecture, art, city of fremantle, development, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on January 10, 2018

 

An interesting flaw in the City of Fremantle’s Percentage for the Arts or Heritage policy came to light during the Planning Committee on Wednesday evening.

Fremantle Society president John Dowson made the very sensible suggestion that the percentage should be used to reinstate the wrought-iron verandahs on the Manning Buildings when they are developed, but was told it is not possible to use the percentage for the arts/heritage on a private building.

I had just written down that the Quest Hotel and another Pakenham Street development both have percentage for the art works attached to their buildings, when Silverleaf director Gerard O’Brien made exactly the same point to the Councillors.

The percentage for the arts and heritage policy was introduced to enhance and beautify the public realm, and Councillor Rachel Pemberton made the realistic observation that verandahs are very much in the public realm.

It is absolutely non-sensical that building owners and developers cannot spend percentage for heritage and arts money on beautifying the public realm with heritage features, but are forced to spend it on often pretty mediocre and uninspiring art that can be attached to their buildings.

Developers tell me that a lot of the money from percentage for the arts is spend on administration and art consultants, and not on the actual art work, so let gets some reality in a policy that is clearly flawed and needs to be amended, so that we can encourage developers to reinstate verandahs, which look much better than modern awnings.

It would be a win win for all!

And to make it clear! I love great public art and believe the percentage for the arts and heritage is good, but it needs to be realistic and flexible.

There are many silly rules and regulations in our planning laws and some of them are detrimental to achieving the best outcome. All the community wants is the very best building outcomes, not silly bureaucratic nonsense.

Roel Loopers

BRIGHTER FREO CAPPUCCINO STRIP

Posted in cappuccino strip, city of fremantle, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on January 3, 2018

 

Cap Strip lights

 

The Fremantle Cappuccino Strip is brighter in the evenings after the installation of new LED street lights.

The City of Fremantle has removed 36 old-fashioned light fittings, using 150 watt metal halide globes, and replaced them with new 40 watt LED fittings.

The new lights will not only shine brighter but also use significantly less power and result in substantial savings on maintenance.

The new LED lights will see energy consumption from the street lights on the strip drop from almost 24,000kwh per year to around 6000kwh, a reduction of around 75 per cent.

The lights also have a lifespan many times longer than metal halide globes, and it will be a few years before they’ll need maintenance. That represents a big saving for the City in labour, parts and equipment.

BY-ELECTION FOR SOUTH FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, democracy, election, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on December 21, 2017

 

The Court of Disputed Returns ruled this morning that the City of Fremantle South Ward Election held on 21 October 2017 was invalid.

This decision was due to one of the unsuccessful ward candidates being declared ineligible to stand in the election.

As a result of the election being declared invalid, Andrew Sullivan is no longer a councillor and the position has been declared vacant.

A new election for the vacant South Ward position will be held on 16 March 2018. It will be funded by the Western Australian Electoral Commission.

The election will again be conducted as a postal election with polling closing at 6.00pm on Friday 16 March 2018.

The roll close date for this election is 5.00pm, Thursday 25 January 2018. Nominations will open on Wednesday 31 January and close at 4.00pm Wednesday 7 February 2018.

Any further enquiries can be made to the Western Australian Electoral Commission.

This is a disgrace and total incompetence of WA Electoral Commission staff, who should have checked the eligibility of all candidates. Sadly Andrew Sullivan has to pay for it now. Humbug!

Roel Loopers

THE YEAR WE HAD IN FREMANTLE

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, development, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on December 21, 2017

 

Christmas is only fours sleeps away and the year has just ten days left, so this is a good time to reflect on what kind of year it was for Fremantle. I do this randomly as important issues come to my mind.

The October local government election was a resounding rebuke for the right-leaning very vocal social media negativity, with all the sitting members re-elected. I find it hard to argue that this is not a vote of confidence in the plans and policies Fremantle Council has implemented. City ward even elected a new Green councillor.

The positivity and negativity of massive planned development is a fine line between a stunning modern Fremantle CBD and an aesthetic disaster that could kill our city’s unique heritage character.

Quite a few new hotels are in the pipeline and that will be good to attract more tourism and for visitors to stay overnight, but the many plans for more taverns in the inner city are a worry.

The Kings Square Project is finally underway and will be the game-changer Fremantle desperately needs, and the new FOMO retail concept by Sirona Capital sounds very exciting.

The change of Australia Day celebrations on January 26 to One Day on the 28th shows Fremantle council is getting more serious about Aboriginal issues, and the funding to investigate a purpose-built Aboriginal centre is also a clear indication that council wants to do more than just tokenism.

The heritage listing of the entire West End is significant and well overdue.

The cancellation of the Roe 8 Perth Freight Link by the new state government, and the Westport taskforce could well open up opportunities for the development of Victoria Quay.

The Long Table Dinner along High Street was a resounding success and raised $ 80,000 for St Pats, so well done Freo community for caring!

Fremantle City took back ownership of Fremantle Oval which opens up opportunities for good development of that precinct. And good riddance to the greedy Dockers!

The development of the South Fremantle Senior High School into Fremantle College and the departure of TAFE also create fantastic opportunities for substantial development in the heart of Beaconsfield.

Well-overdue traffic improvement in the Hilton centre are happening and so is traffic calming in South Fremantle.

The J Shed tavern saga continues and is a stand-off between what the community wants and Freo council stubbornly does not want to accept, while it also fails to concede that the Bathers Beach Arts Precinct concept is a failure.

Notre Dame University listened to the community and scrapped plans for a five-storey School of Nursing and Midwifery in High Street and bought the three-building Customs House complex instead to accommodate expansion.

Fremantle culture is maturing very well with outstanding exhibitions and concerts at the Fremantle Arts Centre and the very impressive and creative High Tide Biennale during the Fremantle Festival. More of that please!

The Cantonment Hill Project is now underway with the opening of the Tuckfield Oval playground.

The City of Fremantle has added three new communication officers, so we should rightly expect much better genuine communication and information from the City. The October election showed that there is a lot of ignorance in the community about what Fremantle Council and the administration do and that needs to be improved.

Well, that’s all that comes to my mind early this Thursday morning, so remind me what I failed to mention and I might do another article on other important issues in a few days time.

Roel Loopers

PUBLIC ART COMMISSION FOR KINGS SQUARE

Posted in art, city of fremantle, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on December 18, 2017

 

Percent for Public Art Commission Kings Square Civic Building and Library Redevelopment
EOI# 910/17

This is a rare opportunity for artists to help shape the future of Fremantle’s city centre for the enjoyment of future generations.

Artist Briefing
11.00am, this Wednesday 20 December 2017
Fremantle Town Hall,
Cnr Adelaide & William Streets Fremantle
RSVP: publicart@fremantle.wa.gov.au or 9432 9571

Expression of Interest Documents can be downloaded by registering at:
https://www.tenderlink.com/fremantle/

Total artwork budget $415,000
Shortlisted artists will be paid a concept design fee of $1,500.

EOI closes: 2pm, Friday 16 February 2018

City of Fremantle : Welcome to City of Fremantle electronic procurement and tendering web pages, which has been designed to improve the speed and efficiency for both City of Fremantle and our suppliers.
TENDERLINK.COM

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FREMANTLE CITY ON THE MOVE

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on December 16, 2017

 

 

Fremantle Council is on the move this weekend from Kings Square to the new temporary offices at Fremantle Oval.

By the end of 2019 the removalists will be back to truck all the office furniture back to Kings Square and into the new Civic Centre that will be built from early next year.

While I was there one man wanted to visit the library already and a woman was looking for the Fremantle Dockers gift shop, that is still listed at the oval on the footy club’s website. Both were out of luck.

Roel Loopers

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FACELIFT FOR UGLY FREO CARPARK

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, parking, Uncategorized by freoview on December 15, 2017

 

Point carpark

 

The City of Fremantle deserves credit for giving the run down Point Street car park a new coat of paint.

The area looks so much better, that one has to wonder why the wealthy SKS Group did not bother to maintain the car park and the vacant site next to it, which the City has now converted into a public car park, with one hour FREE parking!

We are still hoping SKS will actually build the Hilton Doubletree hotel and residential apartments on the site, but I am not holding my breath.

Well done Freo City!

Roel Loopers

SOUTH TERRACE CHANGES TOO LITTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on December 15, 2017

 

South Tce

 

I am surprised about the City of Fremantle hype about the changes to South Terrace in South Fremantle that even made it to prime time TV news yesterday.

Traffic calming between South Street and Douro Road has been on the agenda for a few years and I attended at least four community consultation sessions in the last year and a half.

But the boasted $ 200,000 upgrade only affects a tiny section of the busy road between Sydney Street and Little Lefroy Lane, with no indication when permanent traffic calming will be introduced to the long stretch from Sydney Street to Douro Road.

The report states that the hated temporary rubber speed humps will be removed between Little Lefroy and Sydney Street, but does not mention any improvements for the rest of South Tce and if all the ugly speed humps will make place for raised platforms, as had been promised.

While I welcome the piazza-like changes in the northern section of South Tce there needs to be done more to slow down traffic all along that road and make the area safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

One issue with the temporary speed humps has been that many motorists treat them like stop signs and almost stop before they crawl over them. That is a real nuisance because it is perfectly safe to keep a 35-40kmh speed up to accommodate traffic flow at a moderate speed, even in my 25-year-old car.

Roel Loopers

HAMPTON ROAD PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

Posted in cars, city of fremantle, schools, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on December 14, 2017

 

Fremantle Council sent the pedestrian crossing safety issues at the intersection of Hampton Road and Scott Street back to the drawing board after complaints by members of the community and businesses.

A new median strip had been installed so that traffic heading south along Hampton Road could no longer turn right into Scott Street to the shopping centre, while traffic from Scott Street east could only turn left and south.

This was done to make pedestrian crossing for the students and parents of the Beaconsfield Primary School safer.

As someone who lives there the issues are that traffic coming from the south now needs to turn right into Jenkin Street and then along Maxwell Street to head further east to the school and Hale and Livingston Street. That has significantly increased traffic in that dog leg, and there is no 40kmh school zone in Maxwell Street, but there is in Scott and Hale streets.

One of the problems along Hampton Road is motorists speeding and overtaking in the bus lane, and exiting Scott Street always has been dicey because one can hardly see around the corner.

Pedestrian traffic lights are probably the best solution, but Mainroads will no doubt be reluctant to install them along a major road.

Roel Loopers

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