Freo's View

PHOTOS OF FREO’S MARITIME DAY

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle ports, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on November 2, 2019

 

 

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After an early heavy shower the sun came out just in time for the popular Fremantle Ports Maritime Day, so here a slide show of the photos I took of it.

Roel Loopers

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MARITIME DAY AT FREMANTLE PORT TODAY

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle ports, maritime, navy, Uncategorized by freoview on November 2, 2019

Nov 2. Maritime Day

 

The annual Fremantle Ports MARITIME DAY is on Victoria Quay from 10am till 4pm today so go and enjoy the Navy band, the Sheean submarine, boat rides , stalls, big container trucks, the container exhibitions, etc.

It is a fun day and a good way to express our support for the working Fremantle Port. See you there!

Roel Loopers

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CONTAINER SHOW FOR FREMANTLE BIENNALE

Posted in art, city of fremantle, culture, festival, fremantle ports, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on October 29, 2019

 

 

 

The exhibition ‘Container – the Box that Changed the World’ opens this Saturday. It’s one of many Fremantle Biennale 2019 events. It is free and will be a highlight on Victoria Quay from November 2019 to March 2020

The exhibit is housed in six highly-modified and colourful shipping containers and attracted more than 70,000 people when it was operating at Sydney’s Darling Harbour recently.

It’s a  free travelling exhibition about shipping containers and their massive contribution in today’s society. The interactive, solar-powered, exhibition is housed in six colourful and modified sea containers, with each container telling the story of a different aspect of how sea containers are used and their impact on our lives. You can walk into the containers and read all about how these steel boxes impact our lives.

It relates the history of stevedoring and the emergence of containerisation, how containers move around the world, their environmental aspects, and how they impact people’s lives every day at home or in the workplace.

The exhibition was created by the Australian National Maritime Museum. The six containers will be spread, breadcrumb-style, between the WA Maritime Museum and B Shed.

Principal sponsors of the exhibition are Fremantle Ports, the WA Maritime Museum and the Freight and Logistics Council of WA. Major sponsors are Qube and Intermodal Group, with support from the City of Fremantle.

Neil Stanbury the manager External Affairs at Fremantle Port said: “It’s terrific to be able to present such a great exhibition, right on the harbour, in the 50th year since the international container trade started in Australia, right here in Fremantle.”

“We are, by a number of measures, the most efficient container port in Australia, with the fastest crane rate, best truck turnaround time and we put a higher percentage of containers on rail than anyone else, so Fremantle Ports prides itself on its container operations and this exhibition tells a whole other side to the container industry that the public don’t see, or often think about. We think it’s going to be a big hit with the public this summer.”

“Fremantle Ports’ goal is to enliven Victoria Quay and the Container exhibition is going to be one of our summer lynch-pins in that.”

Roel Loopers

 

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MARITIME DAY AT FREMANTLE PORT ON SATURDAY

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle ports, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on October 28, 2019

 

Nov 2. Maritime Day

 

The annual Fremantle Ports MARITIME DAY is on again this Saturday November 2  from 10am to 4pm, so make sure to head out to Victoria Quay.

There will be harbour rides, marching bands, a Royal Navy submarine and lots of other things to see, enjoy and do.

Entry to the Maritime Museum will only be a gold coin donation on the day so that is well worth a visit.

Roel Loopers

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BEAUTIFUL MORNING AT FREMANTLE PORT

 

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As everyone who reads Freo’s View should know by now I absolutely love the working Fremantle Port, so when I got there this morning for my Saturday morning coffee with my mate Henty at the Express Cafe at B Shed I just had to take photos of the departing container ship just before 7am.

There were heaps of young people on their way to Rottnest Island which always makes me feel I am on holiday.

Roel Loopers

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A SHED PORT DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY

 

 

Fremantle Ports is looking for Expressions of Interest to develop historic A Shed, which is next door to the very popular Maritime Museum on Victoria Quay.

A Shed offers a great location in Fremantle with stunning sunsets and harbour views and all the excitement that comes with an active working port.

If they want a retired photographer in residence I’ll put my hand up and volunteer to live there till I move to Fremantle cemetery  ; >)

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE PORTS WANT A SHED ACTIVATION

Posted in city of fremantle, cruiseliners, development, fremantle ports, heritage, Uncategorized by freoview on October 9, 2019

 

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Fremantle Ports is looking for Expressions of Interest for the redevelopment of historic A Shed on Victoria Quay.

The 2,225 sqm building is the closest one to the very popular Maritime Museum and a short walk to the B Shed Rottnest Island ferry terminal, so perfect for tourist and leisure orientated development.

I am really happy that Fremantle Port finally wants to reactivate A Shed as it has been forlorn and neglected for far too long.

EOI close on November 29 so don’t miss out to make A Shed great again.

Roel Loopers

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IS VICTORIA QUAY DEVELOPMENT GOOD FOR FREMANTLE?

 

Fremantle Council wants the working port to continue for as long as possible but it also wants development all along Victoria Quay, and those South Quay plans are now investigated by the WA government, but will development on Victoria Quay benefit Fremantle or compete with inner city development?

A working port means that the buffer zones around the port do not allow for residential development or a hotel, so all we would be getting at VQ is commercial development of office, retail and hospitality space, as the three suggestions by CODA showed, when this went through a lengthy community consultation process some years ago.

Will it really be good for Fremantle to have competing development at the port when it will be a challenge to fill the new commercial accommodation that will come on line soon in the CBD, and will the City of Fremantle receive council rates from any development within the Fremantle Ports boundaries, or will we have many more buildings that don’t contribute to the City’s coffers?

Any new development at VQ will no doubt have a substantial hospitality component where people can enjoy harbour views and sunsets while dining out or having a drink, and that will mean that the City’s safety rangers will have more work, or would the Port have their own security to police that?

I believe that any development at Victoria Quay should come under the jurisdiction of the City of Fremantle and building owners should pay council rates, as our city needs the extra income much more than Fremantle Ports do.

Roel Loopers

CONNECTING FREO’S FUTURE TO THE PAST

 

I enjoy talking with architects, city planners and developers about Fremantle’s future and have found it educational and inspiring to have discussions with City of Fremantle heritage coordinator architect Alan Kelsall about how we should try to grow Fremantle.

Alan and I agree that in general the Fremantle community recognises that the need for regeneration of the city is necessary and that it is desirable if done well: if it is managed, planned and implemented in ways that reinforce and sustain the sense of Fremantle’s distinctiveness embodied in it, such as the rich mix of built heritage and unique urban character.

However, without broad, long-term public support and commitment to the planning vision for Fremantle it is unlikely to be successful. As a community we therefore need to have a clear understanding of what we mean when we try to articulate it. The ultimate outcome will set the standard for good design within Freo’s heritage areas and getting it right is essential to securing the future of our heritage buildings.

Let’s consider Fremantle’s history and what it means in the context of future growth of our city. Fremantle was developed as a port town and a centre of trade, and for most of its history it was prosperous and acknowledged as the second city in the metro area. That underscores the city’s distinct character and its rich heritage.

The prosperity of Fremantle encouraged the construction of its present heritage buildings. These developments were not simply utilitarian or profit based, but showed a desire to display a mix of business confidence and civic pride. That is probably why these buildings have a quality that people continue to find attractive, and why most people in our community believe it is worth conserving them, not only as memorial of the past but also as exemplars of successful, high quality architecture, urban design and city planning.

Fremantle had buildings with a strong association with the working port, but also buildings that provided a diverse mix of uses. These included schools, shops, places to work and socialise, etc. which people living in its densely populated catchment could reach on foot or by public transport. It is what we now consider to be an example of sustainable urban design.

Fremantle Port played a primary role in Freo’s success and its distinct character due to the facts that processing, storage and distribution of export and import commodities took place in buildings located near the harbour. It created the mutual interdependence between the port and the city that generated and sustained our port city character.

However this pattern of beneficial evolution changed in 1969 with the introduction of containerisation, which caused profound changes in Fremantle, not only because it changed the way in which ships were loaded and unloaded but also because storage and distribution of export and import commodities no longer took place near the harbour. These changes completely severed the earlier mutual supporting interdependencies between the harbour, city centre and surrounding residential suburbs. The changes impacted not only on shipping and its associated industries but also affected the commercial, retail, social and residential vitality of the city. In addition it caused deterioration of the quality of public areas and less appreciation of the worth of its heritage buildings.

It is obviously impossible, and probably not even desirable, to try to replicate the primary role played by the port in the past, but it is possible, through new higher density mixed-use development located between Victoria Quay and Kings Square, within reach of the railway station, to reproduce the type of mutually supporting interdependencies that used to exist between the port and the city centre. For this to be successful though it demands that development is guided by integrated strategic planning that is inspired, but not limited, by the past to create the conditions of genuine everyday activities, that should come as a result of more people living and working and enjoying social leisure time in all its diversity within the same area.

It is important to recognise that the role residential development on appropriate sites in the CBD can play is crucial to generating the vitality and resilience needed to cope with future problems and to adjust to changing circumstances. A fundamental benefit of regenerating and revitalising the area in this way is that it would promote positive change and would contribute to re-establishing Fremantle’s city centre as the heart of the community, which has already started with the Kings Square redevelopment project.

If Fremantle’s heritage is not managed carefully because it is considered to be too hard it will be at risk of being lost and with this its potential to enrich the city in ways that give a sense of distinctiveness, meaning and quality to the places in which people live and work, as well as the sense of destination that attracts people to Freo and makes them want to come and spend time in our city and thus contribute to secure its future.

It is a huge challenge to get it right, but with respectful dialogue between developers, city planners and the community we can all positively contribute to Fremantle’s progress and future.

Roel Loopers

A huge thank you to Alan Kelsall for his collaboration with constructing this article!

 

 

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HUGE MSC ELMA ARRIVES AT FREMANTLE PORT

Posted in city of fremantle, containers, freight, fremantle ports, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on July 20, 2019

 

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One of the largest container vessels ever to arrive in Fremantle Port entered the harbour just before 5pm on Saturday afternoon. The 300-metre-long and 50-metre-wide MSC ELMA can carry nearly 9,600 containers.

She was escorted into port by three tug boats.

Roel Loopers

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