Freo's View

HELP THE DUYFKEN SAIL AGAIN!

Posted in city of fremantle, history, Uncategorized by freoview on November 15, 2017

 

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IS ANZUS OUTDATED? JOHN CURTIN LECTURE

Posted in city of fremantle, history, politics, Uncategorized by freoview on November 13, 2017

 

The statue of former Australian Prime Minister John Curtin is prominently visible next to the Town Hall at Fremantle’s Kings Square, so the Curtin Family Home Lecture 2017 by the National Trust WA will interest Freo people.

The lecture is on Thursday November 23 at 6pm by Dr Daniel Baldino of Notre Dame University. The event is hosted by Freo’s Josh Wilson MP.

It is at the Grove Library on Stirling Highway, Cottesloe.

ANZUS – Australian American Alliance at the Cross-roads?

The foundation of Australia’s security relationship with the United States began with John Curtin’s bold stance on foreign policy now fomalised as the ANZUS Treaty. However, in the wake of Donald Trump’s election, speculation surrounds the politics of the management of the alliance and Australia’s ongoing role and obligations as an alliance partner.

Is ANZUS outdated? What are the actual costs and benefits of the treaty? Can Australia continue to depend on ANZUS in the 21st century with American leadership increasingly under challenge? How far could Australia rely on the United States if it was attacked?

This talk will explore current attitudes towards ANZUS, assess the reliability of the United States as an Australian ally and examine the significant concept of ‘great and powerful’ friends as Australia attempts to adapt to ongoing political and strategic change in modern-day global affairs.

RETHINKING OUR FREMANTLE HISTORY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on November 6, 2017

 

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The Ghost Ship story-telling in the High Tide biennale hub at Arthur Head on Sunday was very interesting, because it is always good to get an Aboriginal perspective on Fremantle’s history.

The speakers were Brett and Laurel Nannup, Melissa Dinnison, Ezra Jacobs, Glenn Iseger-Pilkington

It was especially important to get an update on what is happening on Rottnest Island and the plans for a long-overdue memorial for the nearly 400 men and boys who died at the Quod indigenous prison, and who were buried on the island where tent camp used to be.

Before the invasion by the British Rottnest used to be a ceremonial site and meeting place and also has high spiritual meaning for the Wadjuk people, but there was no physical connection with the island for many years.

Almost 4,000 men and boys, aged between 8 and 80 years of age were incarcerated in the inhumane Quod prison, and many were kept in the Roundhouse gaol until they had enough Aboriginal prisoners to row over to the island, which took between 7-8 hours.

The indigenous speakers mentioned the cultural tension along the WA shoreline with the Dutch, French and English sailing by, and setting foot on land at times.

For the First Nation people it is all about place and identity and rethinking the history. It is complicated to think about the Australian identity when Aboriginal culture and history is not part of the school education in WA.

For me it is astounding that there still is no proper recognition of our Aboriginal people on Rottnest Island and that it has taken so long to no longer use the former Quod prison cells for tourist accommodation.

It took only two years to build an important memorial in Kings Park for the victims of the Bali bombing, but we are still only planning a significant memorial for Aboriginal people on Rottnest Island. 

There is still no government funding allocated from the state and federal governments, and that is not good enough.

Proper recognition of the Wadjuk Noongar history can’t be left to tiny bits of meaningless tokenism. It is well overdue for our governments to get serious about it.

There is a need for a purpose-build Aboriginal cultural centre in WA and a demand from overseas tourists for an indigenous experience when visiting, so let’s get started on this with urgency and priority City of Fremantle. Take the lead!

Roel Loopers

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SO LUCKY TO LIVE IN FREMANTLE

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, fremantle festival, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on November 5, 2017

 

 

Walking around Arthur Head this morning I considered myself very lucky to live in such a beautiful place as Fremantle.

I started with my traditional morning Espresso at Chalkys cafe near the Roundhouse, walked up the steps to have a chat with Glen at the Glen Cowans Underwater Photography Gallery, and wandered down to Bathers Beach where the Indian Ocean water looked sublime and so refreshing, but I did not have my bathers with me.

Back to the High Tide hub next to the Roundhouse where I attended Ghost Ship to listen to Aboriginal history, and I will write a blog post about that in more detail tomorrow.

Ghost Ship is on again from 6-7 pm this evening with a light show. Listen to the story of Yagan, and how important Rottnest Island is to the Wadjuk people.

The Fremantle Festival ends today from 3.30 at Kings Square with the first shopping trolley race, live music and entertainment, so come along.

Before that from 2-4 pm there is free live music in the courtyard of the Fremantle Arts Centre.

The High Tide Biennale will continue for another week, so check out the program as there is some very good stuff in it.

Is it any wonder I love Freo so much?!

 

Roel Loopers

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GHOST SHIPS OF THE PAST

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, fremantle festival, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on November 5, 2017

 

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Ghost Ship is an experimental, experiential, site specific performance that offers unique and personal insights into Western Australia’s colonial history. Four Indigenous storytellers will share their individual insights and take us on a complex journey through our shared history and our complex past.

Unlike the books that hold the histories of European civilisation, nationhood and the colonial adventure, these Indigenous stories are momentary, ephemeral and tens of thousands of years old.

Come listen to Brett and Lily Nannup, Melissa Dinnison, Ezra Jacobs, Glenn Iseger-Pilkington

No matter who you are in Western Australia, it’s likely you have a relationship to the port of Fremantle. Many of us came here by ship. Fremantle’s rich history of migrants, exports, imports, exploration and multicultural melting pots culminate in varied social, cultural and political facets to the community.

Ghost Ship is the starting point for ongoing conversations that recognise our silenced histories and to take with us on our own journeys.

Curated Cultural Tours TODAY at the High Tide hub on Arthur Head next to the Roundhouse. 
11am – 12pm : Children Friendly
6pm – 7pm : With light installation

More info: http://www.hightidefremantle.com/line-up/ghost_ship/

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HISTORIC FREMANTLE BUS TOURS

Posted in city of fremantle, history, tourism, Uncategorized by freoview on September 8, 2017

 

 

I noticed this colourful bus at Victoria Quay this morning, and since I did not know about Fremantle historic bus tours, I thought to share it with you.

According to their http://www.fremantlebustours.com.au website:

From humble beginnings, selling newspapers in Fremantle after school to a full working history within the maritime industry, Peter called Fremantle his home port for a number of years. First, joining the Australian Merchant Navy sailing in and out of Fremantle on Merchant Cargo Ships. Later moving into tourism, Peter captained the Rottnest Island ferries, Swan River ferries and charter boat work. Peter also captained the ferries for whale watching during the humpback whale migration season.

So, join Peter and his crew on this informative 60-minute bus tour to explore Fremantle’s maritime history and early settlement convict days. Our sightseeing tour is created around a thoughtfully designed route within the iconic city of Fremantle. Our buses are climate/temperature controlled well known to comfortably accommodate passengers as we discover a city that goes back to the 18th Century. 

The more things we have in Fremantle for tourists to engage in, the longer they will stay in Fremantle, and the more they will support our local traders, so good luck to Peter!

 

Roel Loopers

 

 

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HISTORY HAS AT LEAST TWO SIDES

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, Uncategorized by freoview on August 28, 2017

 

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Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt made a good point on his blog and here on Freo’s View about the Mailand Brown monument on the Esplanade, that tells both sides of the Langrange massacre that happened in the Kimberley in 1864.

This came in response to Councillor Sam Wainwright writing, a non council related article, that monuments of early explorers and settlers who committed crimes against Aboriginal people should be removed and street names changed.

The Lagrange history is controversial, as three explorers Frederick Panter, James Harding and William Goldwyer disappeared in the remote Kimberley, and a search party by Maitland Brown found them, allegedly speared and clubbed to death by Aborigines.

The alleged massacre saw some ten Aborigines killed by the search party.

Go and have a look yourself at the monument and read both sides of the story.

I wonder why the monument of Captain Fremantle that used to be on the Esplanade was removed some 20 years ago. There is controversial and contradicting history there as well.

Roel Loopers

REWRITING HISTORY IS NOT A SOLUTION

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, racism, Uncategorized by freoview on August 27, 2017

 

The Sunday Times reports today that Fremantle Councillor Sam Wainwright is calling for the removal of historic monuments of people who have committed atrocities against Aboriginal people in Australia.

Before anyone starts yelling, this is a personal opinion of Wainwright and has nothing to do with Fremantle Council!

I like Sam, but don’t agree with his views on this.

History is very complex, and times were very different when the first explorer went far away from their home countries to find new lands.

Racism was unfortunately the norm, rather than the exception in those times and was committed by the Dutch, French, Portuguese, English, Spaniards, etc.

Religion was very black&white and fanatic and there was little respect for people of different beliefs, cultures or skin colour.

The world has changed, and while there is still far too much racism in Australia and around the world, we are improving and have made substantial inroads.

We can not rewrite history and change what happened so many years ago, but we can learn from it.

Changing street names and removing historic monuments will achieve very little, and it also fails to recognise the incredible achievements of the early explorers. They were adventurous, brave, greedy and also racists, but they are also part of us, and they are the roots that helped us grow and learn.

We should make a bigger effort and learn from the mistakes of our past, no longer fight wars, have more respect for different cultures and beliefs, and grow into a tolerant nation. Changing the history books is not the solution, Sam.

 

Roel Loopers

ROUNDHOUSE SEEING THE LIGHT

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, heritage, history, roundhouse, Uncategorized by freoview on June 18, 2017

Roundhouse

 

If the State Heritage Office has no objections the Fremantle Roundhouse will finally get electricity so that the volunteer guides can start applying for funding to Lottery West and elsewhere to install the new displays that have been designed by museum designers after community consultation.

This will finally also give us the change to properly recognise the Whadjuk Noongar people and correct incorrect information.

The displays have been looking tired and outdated for some years now and the Roundhouse needs to become even more attractive to international, interstate and local visitors and use modern technology.

Thanks to the hard work of the Roundhouse  committee, the lobbying of Freo’s View, and the personal commitment from Mayor Brad Pettitt the City has now found a way of funding the power into the oldest public building in WA from a maintenance budget.

We are keen to have more evening events in and around the Roundhouse to help activate Arthur Head after hours and already the High Tide Festival in October will be using the Roundhouse and the Irish Festival in January has also put feelers out to do some events in the Roundhouse.

All we need now is substantial financial support to implement the changes!

Roel Looper

IRISH FREMANTLE FESTIVAL

Posted in fremantle, history, Uncategorized by freoview on June 9, 2017

 

 

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The Irish festival planned for Fremantle to commemorate the arrival of the Hougoumont in Fremantle on January 9, 1868, the last convict ship to sail to Australia 150 years ago, is attracting interest from the Irish government.

The Ambassador of Ireland Breandan O Caollai visited Kidogo Arthouse with a group of officers from the Canberra embassy this week.

The Fenians, Fremantle & Freedom Festival will be held from January 5-14, 2018 at locations around Fremantle from Bathers Beach through the West End and Fremantle Prison.

On board the Hougoumont was also John Boyle O’Reilly who escaped some years later on the Gazelle and ended up as the editor of The Pilot newspaper in Boston, USA.

Between 1865 and 1867 the British had arrested members and supporters of the Irish Republican Brotherhood and 62 of them were transported to the penal colony of Western Australia.

John Boyle O’Reilly became later involved in getting funding for the Catalpa that sailed to Rockingham to pick up six Fenians who had escaped from Fremantle Prison. This fascinating bit of history is commemorated on the Rockingham foreshore with the impressive Six Wild Geese sculpture just south of the townsite.

An Irish festival will means music, dance, food, beer and lots of fun, so I am looking forward to it.

The Facebook page feniansfestival will keep you up to date over the next six months.

Roel Loopers

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