Freo's View

COUNCIL CHANGES TO HILTON FENCING POLICY

 

Fremantle Council’s Strategic Planning and Transport Committee will this Wednesday consider changes to the fencing policy for the suburb of Hilton, so this is what the Officer’s Recommendation is:

Note the outcomes of the community consultation on the proposed changes to Local Planning Policy 3.7, as detailed in agenda Attachment 1.2.

Adopt the following amendments to clause 1.5 of Local Planning Policy 3.7: Hilton Garden Suburb Heritage Area, in accordance with Schedule 2, Clause 4 (3) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015:1.5 Street Walls and Fences 1.5.1 Street walls and fencing forward of the building line shall be a maximum height of 1.2 metres and shall be a minimum of 30% visually permeable above 300 millimetres.

For properties located on the following streets, front fencing shall be visually permeable above 1.2 metres to a maximum height of 1.8 metres, with piers no higher than 2.0 metres:• South Street, between Stock Road and Lee Avenue.• Carrington Street, between South Street and Winterfold Road. • Winterfold Road, between Carrington Street and Collick Street.

Solid masonry (brick) rear fencing shall be permitted for those properties backing onto Stock Road to a maximum height of 2.0 metres.

Council may, at its discretion, vary the requirements of clause 1.5.1 where it is satisfied that the proposed street wall and/or fence: a. Is consistent with character of the prevailing streetscape (including, in relation to this clause only, the house directly across the street and the three houses on either side of that opposing house, where these are located within the Hilton Heritage Areas) AND maintains clear surveillance between the street and the dwelling; orb. is a maximum of 1.5m in height and a minimum of 50% visually permeable. Notwithstanding the above, visually impermeable fencing above 300 millimeters in height will not be supported.

Fencing with a high proportion of visual permeability and reflective of fencing styles and materials traditional to the area (primarily post and wire/mesh infill) is strongly encouraged.

Roel Loopers

 

BEACH STREET DEVELOPMENT ON THE WAY?

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, property, residential, Uncategorized by freoview on August 13, 2019

 

 

Australia 1.jpg

Australia 2

 

Good to see activity on the  Beach Street site next to the Australia Hotel. From memory, and please correct me if I am wrong, an eight-storey residential building was approved for the site by Fremantle council, so hopefully that is what is happening.

Roel Loopers

HISTORIC SPACES FOR LEASE IN FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, community, heritage, local government, property, Uncategorized by freoview on July 26, 2019

 

The City of Fremantle is looking for expressions of interest to lease three properties in town.

Historic Victoria Hall is available for lease, after attempts by the City to sell it failed.

Also for lease, but for community purposes only, is the St John’s ambulance site at Parry Street. I am not sure what happened with the memorandum of understanding the City signed for that building with a soccer club.

And for lease again is the old Weighbridge Station in the roundabout at Phillimore Street. It has no connection to water or sewerage so that will limit its use.

More information is on the City of Fremantle website.

Roel Loopers

 

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POLICE LOOKING FOR NEW FREO STATION

Posted in city of fremantle, cruise, law&order, police, property, Uncategorized by freoview on July 14, 2019

 

WA Police are looking for a new and more suitable site for a new Fremantle police station in the east of Fremantle, so there are a few options available to them.

The St John’s ambulance site in Parry Street will be vacated in due course when the ambos move to O’Connor, and there are two vacant sites near that, one next to St Patrick’s in Queen Victoria Street and one in Beach Street next to the Australia Hotel. The Shacks Holden car dealership sites  at Queen Victoria Street on either side of Finnerty Street are also for sale

While so much police presence in the West End has been reassuring for the community traders and shoppers will no doubt welcome the return of the parking bays in High and Short streets that are now reserved for police vehicles.

I only hope the new police complex will actually be in Fremantle and will not move further away to Melville.

Roel Loopers

OLD FREO NEWS STILL GOOD NEWS

Posted in city of fremantle, development, property, real estate, Uncategorized by freoview on June 20, 2019

 

It must be slow news time or sheer desperation for a good news story that The City of Fremantle and Mayor Brad Pettitt are re-posting an article in Business News about Andrew-Twiggy-Forrest’s investments in Fremantle.

It is old news that Forrest’s companies have bought the Orient Hotel in High Street for $ 4.6 million and the Spicers carpark on the corner of William and Henderson streets from Sirona Capital for $ 7.6 million, as well as 45 Phillimore Street for $ 2.7 million.

So yes, shout it out loud that Andrew Forrest has invested $ 15 million in Freo over the last 15 months and that it is a sign of confidence in Fremantle’s economic rebirth.

Roel Loopers

QUARRY STREET DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES

 

The first item on Wednesday’s Fremantle Council Strategic Planning and Transport Committee is an interesting and challenging one because it is about the City-owned properties 9-15 Quarry Street.

Proposals for the development of the sites have been controversial and not to the liking of local residents who want to retain the low-rise streetscape on the southern side of Quarry Street while it is more likeley that developers would want to build medium to high density there.

The officers recommend to:

Introduction of a uniform zoning of Mixed Use and residential density of R80 with a plot ratio of up to 1, across the lots.

Introduction of specific building height limits and setbacks, to reflect the site’s location and facilitate a transition between high and low density.

Introduction of policy controls to include specific boundary wall, overshadowing, interface and pedestrian access link controls.

Councillors and staff held an on-side workshop on April 1 this year and the agenda state that:

The following broad parameters were discussed at the informal Councillor workshop:

Priority for residential land use given the need to encourage more people to live near central Fremantle, without excluding the potential for a modest mixed use component;

A residential coding of a medium-high density (achieving an equal or greater yield to that under current zoning – previously estimated around 34 dwelling units – refer to December 2018 report);

Diversity of dwelling types is preferred but should not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

Building height up to 4 storeys (reflective of provisions already applicable to Lots 2 and 1 and its associated sub-area) in the centre of the site with lesser heights on the boundaries with existing low density residential (including that to the south-west);

A higher quality design outcome is desired on site, as far as this can be achieved through traditional planning processes (noting the much stronger emphasis on this aspect established in the new R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA);

Existing vegetation should be encouraged to be retained but not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

There should be specific provision on where boundary walls should be permitted, along with minimum setbacks for upper floors to limit bulk and overshadowing on neighbouring properties;

Pedestrian access should be incorporated through the site to provide a connection to Fremantle Park and to potentially activate the ‘dead’ corner at the back of the site

The site walk-around reinforced local community concerns about excessive bulk and height, impacts on amenity, the suitability of the site to accommodate non-residential uses and concerns about design quality. Support was expressed for the proposed pedestrian connection into Fremantle Park.

There have been suggestions made to use the sites for age-care and affordable housing and Slavin Architects released plans on how good low-rise development could be achieved at Quarry Street.

The sites are very well located close to the railway station, high frequency buses, the Leisure Centre and Arts Centre, shopping, schools, Fremantle Park, Princess May Park, etc.

It will have to be seen if developers are interested at all as there are a lot of apartments still vacant at Heirloom and LIV and the proposed Hilton development could not manage any pre-sales of the apartments on offer there.

The residential development of the former  Energy Museum, which is very close to 9-15 Quarry Street has also not eventuated although the Match group has stated it will go ahead with it.

Any other ideas for the sites? Share it with the Freo community!

Roel Loopers

HIGH STREET LEGAL DISPUTE EXPLAINED BY FREMANTLE SOLICITORS

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, property, Uncategorized by freoview on May 31, 2019

 

It is very rare that the City of Fremantle releases legal advise, but CEO Philip St John has decided today to release the following letter from McLeods Barristers&Solicitors concerning the property dispute about 123 High Street, which has received a lot of negative criticism. Here are the two pages:

legal 1

legal 2

 

WHAT IS GOOD TASTE IN BUILDING DESIGN?

 

I think all of us who often complain about the mediocre new architecture we are getting in Fremantle should be delighted that the new DESIGN WA guidelines will apply from today on, but I am quite skeptical about the impact it will have, because good design is like good taste. It is very personal and hard to quantify.

Often when I have slammed the design of buildings others have commented they liked what I believed was atrocious architecture, so why would expert panels be any different in their different taste and preferences? Who dictates what good taste and good design is?

The new DESIGN WA guidelines are all about aesthetics and a review panel of 50 people will decide which planning proposal is in good taste and which one is not. The design review panel comprises of people from architecture, urban design, planning, and landscape architects plus more from heritage, public health, sustainability and engineering. It will be near impossible to reach consensus in such a big group I fear, so Chair Geoff Warn, who is the WA Government Architect, will have a big job ahead of him.

DESIGN WA has got rid of the controversial R-Code system applied up to now, so I wonder if Fremantle and other local councils will also do that. I’ll ask the Fremantle Planning Department if changes will be made in that regard.

I believe that our cities and communities deserve much better design than what we largely have been getting lately, especially for substantial apartment and office buildings. Retaining the tree canopy or providing significant numbers of trees and plants and creating much better streetscapes and public realm will be a very positive step forward. Let’s hope it can all be realised.

Roel Loopers

FREO GATEWAY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Posted in cars, city of fremantle, city planning, development, property, real estate, Uncategorized by freoview on April 3, 2019

 

Shacks 1

Shacks 2

 

The opportunity for two large Fremantle gateway developments are on offer with the two Shacks Holden properties at Queen Victoria being put up for sale.

The two properties on either sides of James Street are more than 11,000sqm, with one of them next to the Heirloom warehouse apartments and opposite the LIV Defence Housing residential building.

One site is 3,464sqm and the other 6,725sqm and offer fantastic opportunities to make a stunning entry statement to Fremantle.

Roel Loopers

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HILTON FENCES DEBATE ON AGAIN

 

Fences in the Fremantle suburb of Hilton have been debated at Fremantle Council frequently lately because of unauthorised and inappropriate fences being built by home owners.

On Wednesday the Hilton fences policy will come before the Strategic Planning and Transport Committee with the officers proposing only minor changes. The policy would basically remain the same but with some flexibility to allow for variations.

OFFICER’S RECOMMENDATION
Council:
1. Resolves to endorse the following modification to Clause 1.5 of the Hilton
Garden Suburbs Precinct Heritage Area Local Planning Policy 3.7 for the
purposes of community consultation:
1.5Street Walls and Fences
1.5.1 Street walls and fencing forward of the building line shall be a
maximum height of 1.2 metres and shall be visually permeable
above 300 millimetres.
1.5.2 For properties located on South Street, between Stock Road and
Lee Avenue, front fencing shall be visually permeable above 1.2
metres to a maximum height of 1.8 metres, with piers no higher
than 2.0 metres.
1.5.3 Solid masonry (brick) rear fencing shall be permitted for those
properties backing onto Stock Road to a maximum height of 2.0
metres.
Council may, at its discretion, vary the requirements of clause 1.5.1
where it is satisfied that the proposed street wall and/or fence:
a. Is consistent with character of the prevailing streetscape (including,
in relation to this clause only, the house directly across the street and
the three houses on either side of that opposing house, where these
are located within the Hilton Heritage Areas) AND maintains clear
surveillance between the street and the dwelling; or
b. is a maximum of 1.5m in height and a minimum of 80% visually
permeable.
2. Request the preparation of community engagement material including clear
explanations and diagrams and undertake consultation on the proposed
changes to Clause 1.5 of the Hilton Garden Suburbs Precinct Heritage Area
Local Planning Policy 3.7 in accordance with Local Planning Policy 1.3 and
the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015.
3. Notes that the conduct of the review of the fencing provisions of the Hilton
Garden Suburbs Precinct Heritage Area Local Planning Policy 3.7 responds
to the review requested in the petition presented to Council on 12 December 2018.

Roel Loopers

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