Freo's View

ABORIGINAL CENTRE UNLIKELY TO BE IN FREMANTLE

Posted in aboriginal, arthur head, city of fremantle, culture, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on September 25, 2019

 

The desire by Fremantle Council to build an Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Arthur’s Head is more a pipe dream than reality because the State Government wants the centre to be part of the East Perth power station development.

Treasurer Ben Wyatt prefers an Aboriginal arts and culture centre to be close to Perth, so one has to wonder why Fremantle Council insists on continuing with an expensive feasibility study when the only way the centre could be built here is with the financial backing of the state and federal governments. There is no way the City of Fremantle can afford to build the centre from ratepayers’ money only, so it’s either private sponsorship or government.

While the City is spending $ 50.000 on the feasibility study Arthur’s Head has been a total mess for nearly two years with large sections of it fenced off due to rock fall danger, so why not prioritise the stabilisation of one of our most popular tourist destinations first.

Roel Loopers

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ABORIGINAL GAMES AT FREMANTLE OVAL

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, fitness, health, indigenous, sport, Uncategorized by freoview on September 11, 2019

 

 

 

 

Two hundred year 5-9 students from ten schools came to Fremantle Oval today for the Culture through Sport event organised by the Stephen Michael Foundation, where they played traditional Aboriginal games most of us Wadjelas have not heard about.

Footy legend Barry Gable and former Dockers player Michael Johnson were in attendance.

The students participated in Meetcha Boma, a hockey game played by Noongar people of the south of WA, where a Meetcha-red gum-was used as a ball and a piece of wood with a crooked root as the hockey stick.

Marn-Grook, or game of ball, was played by Aboriginal groups in Victoria. The ball is kicked high into the air and players try to catch it, similar to a mark in the AFL.

Noongar Wana was played by girls where a small stick was put on the ground and one girl tried to defend the stick while other girls outside a circle around her tried to hit it with a ball.

Edar, a game of chasing and tagging, comes from the Aurukun Aboriginal community.

The kids had a lot of fun.

Roel Loopers

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R.I.P. NINGALI LAWFORD

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, indigenous, theatre, Uncategorized by freoview on August 14, 2019

 

I am deeply saddened by the sudden death of actress Ningali Lawford-Wolf who died in London over night. She was only 52 years old.

I met Ningali for the very first time when she had her one woman show Ningali in the Fremantle Moores building in 1994. It was brilliant and I went to see it two more times and told everyone I knew to not miss it.

Ningali was a Wangkatjunka woman who became more widely known for her role in  Rabbit Proof Fence and Brand Nue Dae.

Her beautiful energy will be missed!

Roel Loopers

 

IRRUNGADJI ARTISTS AT KIDOGO ARTHOUSE

 

July 13 Kidogo NAIDOC

 

Fremantle’s Kidogo Arthouse at Bathers Beach has artists from the Irrungadji community in residence this weekend, so go and say hello and check out their colourful story telling creations.

NAIDOC Week is an important time to connect-even more- with our indigenous people, so don’t forget to go and view the show and have a chat.

Roel Loopers

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NAIDOC WEEK STARTS ON SUNDAY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, community, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on July 5, 2019

 

NAIDOC Week, the celebration of our indigenous culture, starts on Sunday with and event at the PCYC in Hilton from 10am till 2pm.

The theme of the week is Voice.Treaty.Truth-Let’s work together for a shared future.

The PCYC event will have dancing, choir singing, bush tucker, damper making and community stalls so it should be fun for young and old. Go and say Kaya!

The Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre, just a few metres away from historic Roundhouse at Captain’s Lane will have all kinds of events from a community canvas painting to Aboriginal face painting, Nyoongar language for kids, etc. Check it out on their Facebook page.

Roel Loopers

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WALYALUP RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, culture, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on June 26, 2019

 

Ordinary Council of the City of Fremantle signed off on the Walyalup Reconciliation Action Plan on Wednesday evening, which I believe is another big step-many small steps-forward for real reconciliation in our city.

Here from the agenda:

The City is developing a WRAP for many reasons but primarily to engage better with Aboriginal people and the general community to advance values of inclusiveness and equality. It’s been almost 20 years since council committed to developing a Policy on Conciliation, Respect and Recognition and 3 years on from an Aboriginal Engagement Plan.

A key learning from this is that maintaining relationships with Aboriginal people is like an investment with the more invested the better the return. This WRAP will add to this work and form an overarching framework for what is occurring now and to update and measure future deliverables.

Reconciliation Australia determines four types of RAP’s – Reflect, Innovate, Stretch and Elevate. Reflect is for organisations that are new to the reconciliation journey; Innovate is for organisations that are trialling different approaches to reconciliation and are testing where their resources are best invested; Stretch is for organisations that are setting measurable outcome targets for their activities, and Elevate is for organisations that are considered leaders in reconciliation, have a wealth of experience and knowledge, and can assist Reconciliation Australia and other organisations.

In consultation with Reconciliation Australia it was determined the most appropriate RAP type for the City would be the Stretch RAP which was named by the City’s RAP Working Group as the Walyalup Reconciliation Action Plan (WRAP).

The purpose of the City’s WRAP, specifically a Stretch RAP, is to raise awareness and support through the development of solid foundations, governance models and future commitments that promote sustainable opportunities in areas such as employment, economic development and procurement all the while celebrating and recognising Aboriginal culture.

The City’s Stretch WRAP sets out the actions and deliverables required to prepare the City for reconciliation in successive RAPs. The first community forum in September 2018 was well attended with over 100 people who provided input to 15 actions and 74 deliverable outcomes. Media coverage attracted significant interest in the City’s WRAP and in particular the dual naming opportunities identified in the plan. Feedback was sourced from the wider community along with some mandated requirements from Reconciliation Australia, bringing the total of 19 actions and 99 deliverable outcomes over the next three years.

The high number of people accessing the WRAP document along with the robust conversations resulting on social media and throughout the community could be seen as an indication for overwhelming support, in addition to the proportionally low number of raised concerns.

The WRAP will be a whole of organisation approach, guided and championed by the Walyalup Reconciliation Reference Group. The plan will be reviewed every 12 months in alignment with the financial year. The plan will be reviewed with Reconciliation Australia after two years. Reports will be provided annually to Reconciliation Australia, and annually in the City’s Annual Report.

The City’s vision for reconciliation is to create an inclusive, caring community where Aboriginal people experience the same life outcomes as other Australians, and where their special place in our nation and our City is recognised. We want a community and an organisation in which Aboriginal people are acknowledged, listened to and understood; a community and organisation that respect and tell the truth about history, and where healing and growth is nurtured by all of us. Ultimately, we want this to be a shared vision for Fremantle, where the City embraces culture and heritage, and where Aboriginal people are part of making decisions and improvements for community wellbeing.

The City recognises the importance of meaningful engagement, mutual respect, creating trust and utilising culturally appropriate practices and protocols to truly understand its local communities. The City has a strong commitment to working collaboratively with the Aboriginal community.

The resulting document captures this vision and demonstrates the City’s commitment to help increase respect, foster relationships and develop opportunities for Aboriginal people in 19 actions and 99 deliverables.

Roel Loopers

NAIDOC WEEK CELEBRATES ABORIGINAL CULTURE

 

NAIDOC

 

NAIDOC Week is on in July to celebrate our Aboriginal culture so here early notice of the events in Fremantle:

NAIDOC Week Opening Event
Fremantle PCYC
Sunday 7 July, 10am–2pm

NAIDOC Week displays
Fremantle Library, The Meeting Place
7–14 July

School Holidays Colouring-In
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Wednesday 10 July, 12–2pm

Community Canvas
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Thursday 11 July, 12–2pm

Aboriginal Face Painting and Activity Workstations
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Friday 12 July, 12–2pm

Nyoongar Language for Kids
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Saturday 13 July, 1–3pm

Roel Loopers

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RECONCILIATION AWARD FOR ONE DAY IN FREMANTLE

 

One Day

 

Great moorditj news and well deserved!

The City of Fremantle’s alternative Australia Day One Day in Fremantle event has  received an Australian Government award for promoting Indigenous reconciliation.

One Day in Fremantle took out the Promoting Indigenous Reconciliation category at the 2019 National Awards for Local Government in Canberra today.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt and the City’s Aboriginal Engagement Officer Brendan Moore were presented with the award by the federal Minister for Local Government Mark Coulton.

Mayor Pettitt said he was thrilled the City’s efforts to establish the One Day event had received national recognition.

“Our intention with One Day was to create an inclusive, family-friendly event where all members of the community felt comfortable to celebrate what’s great about being Australian,” Mayor Pettitt said.

“I said after the first One Day concert that it was the best event I had ever been involved with. The spirit among the crowd and the sense of belonging and community was a beautiful experience.

“It was never about being anti-Australian or divisive. It was about encouraging people to come out and enjoy Australia’s diversity, bringing people together and promoting reconciliation – which is why I’m so pleased the event has received this award.”

The City of Fremantle first staged the One Day in Fremantle event in January 2017.

The event starts with a traditional smoking ceremony and other Aboriginal cultural activities at Bathers Beach before the focus shifts to the One Day concert at the Esplanade Reserve.

In its first three years the event has featured major Australian artists like Dan Sultan, John Bulter, Kate Miller-Heidke, Montaigne and Kevin Parker from Tame Impala.

It has also showcased emerging Aboriginal artists like Baker Boy, Adrian Eagle and Emily Warramara.

Roel Loopers

NOTRE DAME SCHOLARSHIP FOR ABORIGINAL MEDICINE STUDENTS

 

A $160,000 scholarship fund designed to support Aboriginal students at Fremantle’s Notre Dame University’s School of Medicine will make an important contribution of improving healthcare in the country’s Aboriginal communities.

Announced by St John of God Health Care, the fund will support four Aboriginal students throughout their studies at the University’s School of Medicine.

Professor Selma Alliex, Pro Vice Chancellor and Head of Campus said that “Yet again St John of God Health Care has assisted the University in fulfilling its mission of caring for disadvantaged students”

Nationwide to date only 427 Aboriginal students have graduated with a medical degree with a further 325 currently studying medicine.

When you compare that number to the 3,500 Aboriginal doctors required to reach population parity you begin to understand the challenges associated with Aboriginal heath care,” she added.

The St John of God Health Care scholarships will help build on The School of Medicine’s Fremantle’s achievements in recruiting, supporting and graduating students. Recently the first two Aboriginal students graduated from Fremantle and currently 13 Aboriginal students are among the school’s total cohort of 400.

The scholarships will be provided to students commencing study this year. They will receive $10,000 per year, a total of $40,000 over the four-year degree program.

This level of financial support will make a huge difference to the recipients. Our medicine course is intense and these scholarships will greatly reduce the pressure of having to work long hours to make ends meet,” said Professor Alliex.

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FREMANTLE WALYALUP IS FIFTY FIFTY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 29, 2019

 

 

KAYA! For what it’s worth. The NINE Newspoll about the City of Fremantle wanting to introduce dual names in recognition of our Aboriginal culture has ended, and it was a close call. 49.9% voted YES and 50.1% voted NO.

Welcome to Walyalup!

Roel Loopers

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