Freo's View

NAIDOC WEEK CELEBRATES ABORIGINAL CULTURE

 

NAIDOC

 

NAIDOC Week is on in July to celebrate our Aboriginal culture so here early notice of the events in Fremantle:

NAIDOC Week Opening Event
Fremantle PCYC
Sunday 7 July, 10am–2pm

NAIDOC Week displays
Fremantle Library, The Meeting Place
7–14 July

School Holidays Colouring-In
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Wednesday 10 July, 12–2pm

Community Canvas
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Thursday 11 July, 12–2pm

Aboriginal Face Painting and Activity Workstations
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Friday 12 July, 12–2pm

Nyoongar Language for Kids
Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre
Saturday 13 July, 1–3pm

Roel Loopers

RECONCILIATION AWARD FOR ONE DAY IN FREMANTLE

 

One Day

 

Great moorditj news and well deserved!

The City of Fremantle’s alternative Australia Day One Day in Fremantle event has  received an Australian Government award for promoting Indigenous reconciliation.

One Day in Fremantle took out the Promoting Indigenous Reconciliation category at the 2019 National Awards for Local Government in Canberra today.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt and the City’s Aboriginal Engagement Officer Brendan Moore were presented with the award by the federal Minister for Local Government Mark Coulton.

Mayor Pettitt said he was thrilled the City’s efforts to establish the One Day event had received national recognition.

“Our intention with One Day was to create an inclusive, family-friendly event where all members of the community felt comfortable to celebrate what’s great about being Australian,” Mayor Pettitt said.

“I said after the first One Day concert that it was the best event I had ever been involved with. The spirit among the crowd and the sense of belonging and community was a beautiful experience.

“It was never about being anti-Australian or divisive. It was about encouraging people to come out and enjoy Australia’s diversity, bringing people together and promoting reconciliation – which is why I’m so pleased the event has received this award.”

The City of Fremantle first staged the One Day in Fremantle event in January 2017.

The event starts with a traditional smoking ceremony and other Aboriginal cultural activities at Bathers Beach before the focus shifts to the One Day concert at the Esplanade Reserve.

In its first three years the event has featured major Australian artists like Dan Sultan, John Bulter, Kate Miller-Heidke, Montaigne and Kevin Parker from Tame Impala.

It has also showcased emerging Aboriginal artists like Baker Boy, Adrian Eagle and Emily Warramara.

Roel Loopers

NOTRE DAME SCHOLARSHIP FOR ABORIGINAL MEDICINE STUDENTS

 

A $160,000 scholarship fund designed to support Aboriginal students at Fremantle’s Notre Dame University’s School of Medicine will make an important contribution of improving healthcare in the country’s Aboriginal communities.

Announced by St John of God Health Care, the fund will support four Aboriginal students throughout their studies at the University’s School of Medicine.

Professor Selma Alliex, Pro Vice Chancellor and Head of Campus said that “Yet again St John of God Health Care has assisted the University in fulfilling its mission of caring for disadvantaged students”

Nationwide to date only 427 Aboriginal students have graduated with a medical degree with a further 325 currently studying medicine.

When you compare that number to the 3,500 Aboriginal doctors required to reach population parity you begin to understand the challenges associated with Aboriginal heath care,” she added.

The St John of God Health Care scholarships will help build on The School of Medicine’s Fremantle’s achievements in recruiting, supporting and graduating students. Recently the first two Aboriginal students graduated from Fremantle and currently 13 Aboriginal students are among the school’s total cohort of 400.

The scholarships will be provided to students commencing study this year. They will receive $10,000 per year, a total of $40,000 over the four-year degree program.

This level of financial support will make a huge difference to the recipients. Our medicine course is intense and these scholarships will greatly reduce the pressure of having to work long hours to make ends meet,” said Professor Alliex.

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FREMANTLE WALYALUP IS FIFTY FIFTY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 29, 2019

 

 

KAYA! For what it’s worth. The NINE Newspoll about the City of Fremantle wanting to introduce dual names in recognition of our Aboriginal culture has ended, and it was a close call. 49.9% voted YES and 50.1% voted NO.

Welcome to Walyalup!

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE CELEBRATES OUR ABORIGINAL HISTORY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, community, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on May 26, 2019

 

econ 1

econ 2

 

Sharing open and honest truth about local Aboriginal history and culture is at the heart of the City of Fremantle’s National Sorry Day and Reconciliation Week commemorations.

National Reconciliation Week, held annually from 27 May–3 June, is an opportunity for all Australians to reflect on their national identity and history, and explore how each of us can contribute to achieving reconciliation.

The week is preceded by National Sorry Day on 26 May, which acknowledges and recognises members of the Stolen Generation.

Working with this year’s National Reconciliation Week theme ‘Grounded in Truth: Walk Together with Courage’, the City is hosting a number of community events at the Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre (WACC) and Fremantle Library.

A key event is the Truth Telling Photographic Exhibition, which features a series of incredibly poignant photos depicting the early relationship of Aboriginal people in Western Australia.

The free exhibition on display at the WACC is open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10am–3pm.

The WACC is also hosting an Over 55s Aboriginal Art Class on Thursday 30 May from 12–2pm, where participants can learn about Nyoongar culture, symbols and techniques to create their very own dot paining.

The film In Between Songs is screening at the WACC on Friday 31 May at 12pm; the film’s story follows an Aboriginal family’s struggle to maintain its ancestral traditions in the face of modern societal, economic and environmental pressures.

Across town, Fremantle Library will host a special Reconciliation Yarn with Whadjuk Nyoongar Joe ‘Possum’ Collard.

Closing out the week’s events is a Cultural Walk through Bathers Beach precinct on Saturday 1 June. On the walk, people will discover the significance of the area for Nyoongar people, while learning about bush tucker, animals, insects and the seasons.

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE WILL NOT DISAPPEAR

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 22, 2019

 

 

How can we stop the ridiculous claims in the media that Fremantle wants to change its name to Walyalup? The Reconciliation Action Plan, that is out for community consultation, suggests to acknowledge Aboriginal names for our city and its landmarks, that means we add Noongar names to the English names, not replace them.

Already there are many negative comments on social media, as if our Aboriginal history is something we should be ashamed about when we should be proud that we are part of a 50.000 year ancient history.

It is not as if before British settlement this country we now call Australia was a fascist society with a past we’d better not mention. It is a huge island where Aboriginal people lived in relative peace and harmony. They lived respectfully in an often nomadic lifestyle off mother earth, in a society with strong tribal laws which kinship and tribal boundaries that were adhered to.

Men in the communities educated the boys and the women were responsible for bringing up the girls, and food was often shared in the best communal sense of extended families.

It is a proud history of stories and songlines and of sacred sites and of deep respect for nature and the earth.

Why should we not share our Aboriginal history by letting people know the names the traditional owners have for all the landmarks and rivers? It is not as if a Big Bang happened in 1829 on the west coast of this huge continent and suddenly there was population in this terra nullius, or uninhabited land. That disrespectful suggestion was soundly rejected by the High Court of Australia which acknowledged that Aboriginal people have lived here for some 50.000 years. A history of hardship and resilience to be proud of!

What is the big deal to have signs that show Fremantle and underneath it Walyalup to acknowledge that history. What is wrong with pointing out that Arthur’s Head is also known as Manjaree and Rottnest Island as Wadjemup?

The acceptance of Aboriginal names is already widespread around Australia. Most people now call Ayers Rock Uluru, the Olgas are known as Kata Tjuta, the Bungles as Purnululu, and Turkey Creek is better known as Warmun.

The TV reporter who smugly told his viewers last night that Fremantle could not change the name of the Swan River to Derbarl Yerrigan because it would need State Government approval to do so was only starting a fear campaign because all Fremantle Council might do is put some signs along the river to also acknowledge the Aboriginal name and history of the river.

No one’s history is threatened people and Fremantle will not disappear from the map of WA and Australia. Our post settlement history and names will remain and be told next to the pre European settlement history of our Aboriginal people. It is showing respect for our now shared past and future, and in my opinion it is very welcome and a long time overdue.

 

Roel Loopers

FREO ABORIGINAL NAMES A MOORDITJ IDEA

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, culture, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 21, 2019

 

KAYA! The West Australian reports this morning that Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt has stated that it is very likely that Fremantle and some of its landmarks will get dual names which include the Noongar name, such as Walyalup for Fremantle, Manjaree for Arthur’s Head, etc.

Aboriginal names is already something I make school students visiting the Roundhouse aware of and also when I am in charge of firing the 1pm cannon, where we acknowledge the Whadjuk Noongar people as the traditional owners.

Making people aware of Aboriginal names for areas is good education and historic fact and it is good for reconciliation, so I am all for it.

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt told the West it is encouraging what Fremantle wants to do while opposition shadow minister Tony Krsticevic says it would be confusing to have dual names.

Fremantle Council has just put out a new Reconciliation Action Plan for public comments that will guide Council toward a new and more up to date policy that will replace the policy implemented twenty years ago. Good on them! Moorditj!

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN DRAFT

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, community, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 10, 2019

 

RAP Working Group

 

The draft Fremantle Reconciliation Action Plan-RAP is out for public consultation, so I copy and paste this below from the City of Fremantle:

Our vision for reconciliation

The City’s vision for reconciliation is to create an inclusive, caring community where Aboriginal people experience the same life outcomes as other Australians, and where their special place in our nation and our City is recognised. We want a community and an organisation in which Aboriginal people are acknowledged, listened to and understood; a community and organisation that respect and tell the truth about history, and where healing and growth is nurtured by all of us. Ultimately, we want this to be a shared vision for Fremantle, where the City embraces culture and heritage, and where Aboriginal people are part of making decisions and improvements for the wellbeing of people.

Our Walyalup Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) is a three year plan that is reported on annually. This is Council’s first RAP following the formative policy for respect, recognition and conciliation with Aboriginal people in 2000. Based on recommendation from Reconciliation Australia on the work the City of Fremantle has done thus far, Council decided to begin with a Stretch RAP.

This draft RAP was developed in consultation with the RAP Working Group, local Aboriginal community, elders and other stakeholders through a series of workshops and meetings facilitated by Kambarang Services. The diverse input from over 100 people has been summarised into a practical plan for Reconciliation, focused around Relationships, Respect, Opportunity and Governance. It contains 15 actions and 74 deliverables.

Our hope is that, in working together, speaking together, hearing each other and most of all committing to a better future together we will replace ignorance, mistrust, racism and hostility with genuine connection, trust and unity.

There are several ways to access the draft RAP or find out more:

  • View the draft RAP online, by clicking here or visiting the document library on this page.
  • A hard copy is available at the Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre(External link) (WACC), Thursdays and Fridays from 10.00am to 3.00pm. Staff are also available at the WACC during these times to tell you more about the RAP and a paper submission form is available.
  • A hard copy is also available in the Wanjoo Lounge(External link) at Fremantle Library, staffed by volunteers Monday to Friday 9.00am to 3.00pm. A paper submission form is available.

We encourage you to read the draft Walyalup RAP including the actions and tell us your thoughts below by 4.00pm Monday 27 May 2019.

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NO FREMANTLE MONEY FOR PIPE DREAM

 

After the WA State Government’s announcement of the redevelopment of the former East Perth Power Station and Premier Mark McGowan hinting that it could be a good location for a National Aboriginal Centre it would be prudent for Fremantle Council to reconsider spending $ 50,000 of ratepayers money on a feasibility study to have the centre built at J Shed on Bathers Beach.

No matter how much we would love that centre to be established in Fremantle it is no use throwing money at a pipe dream that will never happen. The proper way is to have a meeting with the State Government first and find out if they would consider Fremantle at all, before we are spending so much money on researching the feasibility of it.

The City of Cockburn also want an Aboriginal Centre, so let’s not get too carried about a Fremantle one.

A shame though that the State Government allows the former South Fremantle Power Station to rot away and not develop it into a major attraction for Fremantle and Cockburn.

Roel Loopers

PRAGMATISM REQUIRED FOR FREMANTLE ABORIGINAL CENTRE

 

 

Fremantle Council minutes that deal with J Shed must be reaching biblical proportions when one considers how often the art shed at Bathers Beach comes before Council and Council committees.

It is on again this Wednesday at the FPOL Committee where officers recommend not to engage in new lease negotiations with the current artists there but continue the existing leases, with a 12 month termination-of-lease clause because of Council’s desire to built an Aboriginal cultural centre in that location.

Perth is well overdue for a WA Aboriginal centre and it should be in Fremantle, but it is highly premature to not extend the artists’ leases as it will be many years, if at all, when such a centre will be built at Bathers Beach.

A Western Australian Aboriginal centre is well beyond the scope of the City of Fremantle and should be a State facility; financed, curated and managed by the WA Government.

It will require extensive and very lengthy consultation with our indigenous people from Wyndham to Albany and Fremantle to Kalgoorlie and beyond, so that is going to take years.

Then there should be an architecture competition for a remarkable and outstanding building, plus detailed curatorial work that will require years of research with the support of the WA Museum, Bernd Museum, WA’s Aboriginal people, historians, art experts, etc.

Once the historical, cultural and art content has been agreed on the design of the displays will need to be dealt with, and that won’t be done overnight either.

It will be brilliant to have a stunning Aboriginal centre at Bathers Beach, as Manjaree/Arthur’s Head is where the first contact between the British colonists and local indigenous people took place. It is also the location of the Roundhouse, WAs oldest remaining public building, and the location from where many Aboriginal men and boys were transported from to the horrible Quod prison on Wadjemup/Rottnest Island.

And if this becomes a State project Fremantle’s feasibility study might be superfluous as the State will have to go through a process first of identifying preferred locations for the new centre and decide if it will actually be in Fremantle, or Elizabeth Quay, Burswood, or elsewhere. That is not going to happen  in just a few years, so why not give the J Shed artists at least a two-year lease that can be extended by 12 months from thereon. It’s the realistic and pragmatic course to take.

Roel Loopers

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