Freo's View

IT’S NATIONAL RECONCILIATION WEEK

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, culture, heritage, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on May 27, 2018

 

Nat Reconciliation Week May 27

 

KAYA! A reminder that it is National reconciliation Week next week, so connect with our Whadjuk Noongar friends, read about indigenous history and culture or just buy a ork of Aboriginal art. There is a beautiful new exhibition at the Japingka Gallery in Fremantle’s High Street!

 

Roel Loopers

STORIES OF NYUNGAR DANCING PERFORMANCE

 

Nyungar dancing

 

I have been reading the fascinating Dancing in Shadows book about Histories of Nyungar performance by historian Anna Haebich and recommend it to anyone interested in the history of our local Wadjuk Nyungar, and all the indigenous people of Australia.

The book published by UWA was gifted to me by my generous mate Paolo Gumina and I can’t thank him enough! I have already learned so many new things about WA’s Nyungar history in the first 100 pages.

The book is about corroborees  and dancing and The power of Indigenous performance pitted against the forces of settler colonisation and is a fantastic read.

One important fact I learned is that with 40,000 people our WA Nyungars are the largest Aboriginal group/tribe/nation in Australia.

The book launch was held at the New Edition bookshop in Fremantle’s High Street, so they will have copies for you to purchase. Go and get one today!

Roel Loopers

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DESERT ART AT KIDOGO ARTHOUSE

Posted in aboriginal, art, city of fremantle, culture, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on April 17, 2018

 

Kidogo 19 April opening Daisy Ward

 

PURLTIKATJA is a stunning show of work by Daisy Tjuparntarri Ward that opens this Thursday evening at Fremantle’s Kidogo Arthouse on Bathers Beach. The exhibition runs from the 19-25 April

The exhibition, curated by anthropologist Jan Turner, features canvasses from the deserts of Western Australia and in particular the Ngaanyatjarra Lands. Canvasses gathered over twenty years to tell stories, to communicate, to make explicit, Indigenous concepts, histories and family relationships. Canvasses used as tools of explanation in the contexts of land rights, native title, mining negotiations and the politics of representation. Canvasses that by their existence have provided a conduit for two worlds to come together in often difficult circumstances.

The desert woman, Daisy Tjuparntari Ward makes a guest appearance at this exhibition. An artist, a cross-cultural educator, an ambassador for her people, a political rights activist and a proud upholder of her culture. Ward and Turner have shared for thirty years an inter-cultural space, as tjurturarra [a two sister team]. Born in the same year, cultures apart, they have grown together learning much about their own and each other’s cultures.

Many of the canvasses come from the period prior to the establishment of community based commercial art centres. The artists represented in this highly personal collection come from several language groups: Ngaanyatjarra, Mantjiltjara, Pitjantjatjara and Pintupi. The artworks are tangible representations of the anthropologist’s relationships through generations and across language groups. They were collected specifically for the purpose of cross-cultural education, as visual components of an anthropologist’s toolkit.

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STUNNING ABORIGINAL ART AT REVEALED MARKET

 

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Click on photos to enlarge!

 

No doubt Pauline Hanson would not agree with the wonderful, wonderful REVEALED Aboriginal art market and exhibition at the Fremantle Arts Centre today because there is too much emphasis on Aboriginal people.

Well, Pauline, if you want to ignore 50,000 years of a beautiful people and culture and their long history in Australia just please your own ignorance. For people like me REVEALED is a great opportunity to see art from the desert, the Kimberley and down South and connect with our indigenous friends.

The atmosphere in the courtyard is fantastic and half of Perth came out to buy some stunning Aboriginal art, so go and join them!

Roel Loopers

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ABORIGINAL CHILDREN’S STORYTELLING FESTIVAL

Posted in aboriginal, BOOKS, city of fremantle, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on March 30, 2018

 

KAYA! A big mob of people turned up this morning at the Fremantle Moores building for the official opening of the inaugural Woylie Aboriginal Australian Kids Story Festival.

It is the concept of the Paper Bird bookshop’s owner Jennifer Jackson and already a great success.

Under the watchful eyes of kids and grown ups and State Treasurer Ben Wyatt, and elders such as Noel Nannup, Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt, member for Fremantle Simone McGurk, etc. Noongar elder Marie Taylor did a welcome to country and smoking ceremony.

Today the program is 1pm Desert Tales, 1.30pm Madjitil Moorna Choir, 2.15pm Golden Spirit and 3pm Young Naturalists.

Saturday 7.30am, Breakfast with the Publishers, 10am Silly Birds!, 11am Story Custodian of Noongar Boodjar, 12.20pm Battle of the Illustrators, 1.15pm Diverse Voices, 2.15pm Colours and Dreams.

Check out more on http://www.paperbird.com.au/events/aaksf

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Roel Loopers

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ABORIGINAL STORY TELLING FOR KIDS FREO FESTIVAL

Posted in aboriginal, art, children, city of fremantle, culture, family, festival, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on March 25, 2018

 

 

Hey mums and dads and girls and boys next week’s WOYLIE FESTIVAL is not something to be missed!

This Aboriginal Australian Kids Story Festival is going to be something very special that will be fun and very educational.

Story telling, music, art, dance will be on at the Moores building in Henry Street for a week, including the long Easter weekend, so plenty of days to join in.

Among those who will tell their stories are Noel Nannup, Kim Scott, Theresa Walley, Kerry-Ann Winmar, Ambelin Kwaymullina, Sally Morgan, Josie Boyle, Gregg Dreise and Dub Leffer.

There will be activities, displays, books, language and writing qorkshops and much more.

The Woylie Festiva idea was initiated by Jennifer Jackson of the lovely Paper Bird Children’s Bookshop next to the Moores building.

For more details: http://www.paperbird.com.au/event/aaksf

 

Roel Loopers

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WELCOME TO PARADISE ABORIGINAL ART SHOW

Posted in aboriginal, art, city of fremantle, exhibition, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on March 19, 2018

 

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Fremantle’s great and long-established Aboriginal art gallery Japingka in High Street in the West End of town is opening a new exhibition this coming Friday March 23 by artists from the Ampilatwatja community.

Welcome to Paradise reveals the traditional country of Alyawarr people of Central Australia. The community of Ampilatwatja is north-east from Alice Springs, and its art centre has operated there since 1999.

The paintings focus on the landscapes of locations that form the ancestral grounds of the people. Many artists depict Arreth, the bush medicine plants traditionally harvested by the people. The reflections of the artists and the on-going ties to the land are seen in the paintings, which are formed by the use of tiny dots that create the features of the country.

Traditional knowledge is viewed through the lens of appropriate standing of the individual, with stories reserved for the initiated in customary law, and stories appropriate for wider exposure to the outside world. The artists are bound by these laws and so can reveal some aspects of their country and customs, while with-holding other aspects as part of the restricted knowledge of their country.

These beautiful landscape images of Alyawarr country are on view at Japingka Gallery from 23 March until 16 May 2018.

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LEARN ABOUT OUR SHARED HISTORY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, fremantle foundation, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on February 20, 2018

 

The Fremantle Foundation is holding a Vital Conversation about Australia’s shared history – opening hearts, opening minds

It is an intensive one day workshop exploring ‘Australia’s Shared History’.

We learnt about Captain Cook, Stirling and Fremantle and the history of British colonisation but most of us know very little about Australia’s history from the Indigenous perspective.

With discussions around Australia Day increasing and the success of One Day in Fremantle, this Vital Conversation offers the chance to take the next step in your personal understanding.

This one day intensive brings knowledge and deep insights into the shared history of Australians. It looks through the eyes of the First Australians and with this Indigenous perspective sheds light on a past we all share.

Specifically it will increase effective and respectful professional and personal relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians by:

  • gaining knowledge of our shared history from an Indigenous perspective
  • increasing awareness of the impacts which continue to affect Aboriginal Australians today
  • learning to be comfortable and confident in the third space

It is on at 8.30AM – 4.30PM, Tuesday 27th February in the Big Hall in the Old Boys School, 92 Adelaide St. Fremantle, just opposite the Basilica.

Cost: $80 per person

Lunch and refreshments are provided.

The day is facilitated by Jenny Hunter and Kelly Terry, with guest Aboriginal presenters including respected Aboriginal elder Dr Noel Nannup.

 

Roel Loopers

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FOUR DAYS TO CELEBRATE AUSTRALIA

Posted in australia day, city of fremantle, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on November 12, 2017

 

The announcement by the City of Perth that it will extend next year’s Australia Day celebrations to a four-day long weekend shows that the City of Fremantle is on the right track with its changes to the national holiday.

The scrapping of the fireworks in Fremantle last year was controversial, and unfortunately the debate about it became political and sometimes racist for all the wrong reasons.

Yes, there could have been better community consultation, especially with the business community, but from experience we know that community consultations can drag on forever and not necessarily create the best outcomes. Leadership is about making tough decisions, in the knowledge one will never ever please everyone in the community.

Perth now wants fireworks on New Year’s Eve as well, which I consider a huge waste of money. Why have two firework displays just 26 days apart, or will they also walk away from the Australia Day firework display?

But I would love to see the Fremantle ONE DAY event extended and also have a night feature. Projections, laser show, lit-up floats at Bathers Bay, etc.

I would prefer it if BID spend the business money and energy on creating an evening event, instead of supporting only the Fishing Boat Harbour traders and share the cost of the Australia Day fireworks.

Fact is that most shops were already closed well before the spectators for the fireworks turned up, so there was little benefit for other traders, while the One Day event started in the afternoon when shops are still open.

Fremantle is different from Perth and other cities and I support the consideration for our indigenous people who call Australia Day Invasion Day, so let’s move on together, as other councils around the nation are now also doing.

Historically January 26 means nothing to Western Australia as the Britih had not even settled on this side of the country when the First Fleet arrived in Botany Bay, so the date is only significant to New South Wales.

Like Perth, let’s celebrate Australia over the long weekend, until our politicians change the date to a more appropriate one that does not upset our indigenous friends.

Roel Loopers

 

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RETHINKING OUR FREMANTLE HISTORY

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on November 6, 2017

 

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The Ghost Ship story-telling in the High Tide biennale hub at Arthur Head on Sunday was very interesting, because it is always good to get an Aboriginal perspective on Fremantle’s history.

The speakers were Brett and Laurel Nannup, Melissa Dinnison, Ezra Jacobs, Glenn Iseger-Pilkington

It was especially important to get an update on what is happening on Rottnest Island and the plans for a long-overdue memorial for the nearly 400 men and boys who died at the Quod indigenous prison, and who were buried on the island where tent camp used to be.

Before the invasion by the British Rottnest used to be a ceremonial site and meeting place and also has high spiritual meaning for the Wadjuk people, but there was no physical connection with the island for many years.

Almost 4,000 men and boys, aged between 8 and 80 years of age were incarcerated in the inhumane Quod prison, and many were kept in the Roundhouse gaol until they had enough Aboriginal prisoners to row over to the island, which took between 7-8 hours.

The indigenous speakers mentioned the cultural tension along the WA shoreline with the Dutch, French and English sailing by, and setting foot on land at times.

For the First Nation people it is all about place and identity and rethinking the history. It is complicated to think about the Australian identity when Aboriginal culture and history is not part of the school education in WA.

For me it is astounding that there still is no proper recognition of our Aboriginal people on Rottnest Island and that it has taken so long to no longer use the former Quod prison cells for tourist accommodation.

It took only two years to build an important memorial in Kings Park for the victims of the Bali bombing, but we are still only planning a significant memorial for Aboriginal people on Rottnest Island. 

There is still no government funding allocated from the state and federal governments, and that is not good enough.

Proper recognition of the Wadjuk Noongar history can’t be left to tiny bits of meaningless tokenism. It is well overdue for our governments to get serious about it.

There is a need for a purpose-build Aboriginal cultural centre in WA and a demand from overseas tourists for an indigenous experience when visiting, so let’s get started on this with urgency and priority City of Fremantle. Take the lead!

Roel Loopers

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