Freo's View

MANNING REDEVELOPMENT ON TRACK

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, heritage, hospitality, Uncategorized by freoview on June 24, 2019

 

Manning 2

Manning 1

 

Work on the Manning Building redevelopment in the Fremantle inner city is progressing well with two large metal frames installed at the back of it in Paddy Troy Lane.

The Silverleaf Investments development will see a new tavern, micro brewery and distillery being added to the heritage building and hopefully help with the Fremantle Council’s efforts of  revitalising the CBD.

Roel Loopers

THE KINGS SQUARE BACK SIDE

 

Kings Square

 

Every time I drive along South Terrace I notice the southern aspect of the Kings Square Redevelopment Project and since I had a meeting at Fremantle Council yesterday afternoon I decided to finally take a photo of it.

 

Roel Loopers

LATEST FROM KINGS SQUARE REDEVELOPMENT

 

FOMO 1

FOMO 2

 

The latest look at the new Sirona Capital buildings along Fremantle’s William Street and Queen Street.

It is all part of the Kings Square Redevelopment Project with the new City of Fremantle civic centre building progressing well at Kings Square.

Roel Loopers

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QUARRY STREET DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES

 

The first item on Wednesday’s Fremantle Council Strategic Planning and Transport Committee is an interesting and challenging one because it is about the City-owned properties 9-15 Quarry Street.

Proposals for the development of the sites have been controversial and not to the liking of local residents who want to retain the low-rise streetscape on the southern side of Quarry Street while it is more likeley that developers would want to build medium to high density there.

The officers recommend to:

Introduction of a uniform zoning of Mixed Use and residential density of R80 with a plot ratio of up to 1, across the lots.

Introduction of specific building height limits and setbacks, to reflect the site’s location and facilitate a transition between high and low density.

Introduction of policy controls to include specific boundary wall, overshadowing, interface and pedestrian access link controls.

Councillors and staff held an on-side workshop on April 1 this year and the agenda state that:

The following broad parameters were discussed at the informal Councillor workshop:

Priority for residential land use given the need to encourage more people to live near central Fremantle, without excluding the potential for a modest mixed use component;

A residential coding of a medium-high density (achieving an equal or greater yield to that under current zoning – previously estimated around 34 dwelling units – refer to December 2018 report);

Diversity of dwelling types is preferred but should not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

Building height up to 4 storeys (reflective of provisions already applicable to Lots 2 and 1 and its associated sub-area) in the centre of the site with lesser heights on the boundaries with existing low density residential (including that to the south-west);

A higher quality design outcome is desired on site, as far as this can be achieved through traditional planning processes (noting the much stronger emphasis on this aspect established in the new R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA);

Existing vegetation should be encouraged to be retained but not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

There should be specific provision on where boundary walls should be permitted, along with minimum setbacks for upper floors to limit bulk and overshadowing on neighbouring properties;

Pedestrian access should be incorporated through the site to provide a connection to Fremantle Park and to potentially activate the ‘dead’ corner at the back of the site

The site walk-around reinforced local community concerns about excessive bulk and height, impacts on amenity, the suitability of the site to accommodate non-residential uses and concerns about design quality. Support was expressed for the proposed pedestrian connection into Fremantle Park.

There have been suggestions made to use the sites for age-care and affordable housing and Slavin Architects released plans on how good low-rise development could be achieved at Quarry Street.

The sites are very well located close to the railway station, high frequency buses, the Leisure Centre and Arts Centre, shopping, schools, Fremantle Park, Princess May Park, etc.

It will have to be seen if developers are interested at all as there are a lot of apartments still vacant at Heirloom and LIV and the proposed Hilton development could not manage any pre-sales of the apartments on offer there.

The residential development of the former  Energy Museum, which is very close to 9-15 Quarry Street has also not eventuated although the Match group has stated it will go ahead with it.

Any other ideas for the sites? Share it with the Freo community!

Roel Loopers

DIGGING FOR FREO’S NEW CIVIC CENTRE

 

Kings Square

 

Fremantle’s hole in the ground is getting deeper. The excavation for the library part of the new Civic Centre at Kings Square is becoming more prominent by the day.

Roel Loopers

FREO CBD DEVELOPMENTS PROGRESS

 

 

I had a look at the progress of two major Fremantle inner city developments at Kings Square and the Manning building and it was reassuring to see that things are going well and fast.

Contractors for Silverleaf Investment are working hard on creating the new tavern and micro brewery at the back of the Manning building, so that will be an exciting new addition to the Freo hospitality industry.

Here a few photos to see where they are at.

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE PORTS HERITAGE PRESERVATION A PRIORITY

 

z

 

It is good to finally see some restoration work on heritage buildings at Fremantle Ports. They started on the former Immigration Building and are also doing some work at B Shed.

But the neglect of A Shed that has been rotting away for years now is not acceptable, and since the public has no access to other sheds along Victoria Quay we don’t really know how bad it is elsewhere.

Fremantle Ports is keen on activating Victoria Quay, and that is a good thing, and they are also keen to start with development there, but that is unlikely to occur until the final Westport Taskforce report has been delivered and the State Government has made a decision about the future of Fremantle Port and Victoria Quay, so that is a long way away still.

Up to then it is the duty of Fremantle Ports to look after the heritage there. It is not acceptable to have a demolition by neglect attitude, so they need to prioritise the maintenance of the old sheds.

Roel Loopers

 

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FREMANTLE CIVIC CENTRE TAKING SHAPE

 

ks 1

Kings square 2

 

The new Fremantle Civic Centre at Kings Square is starting to get shape and one can understand a little bit better what is going on.

I took these photos on Tuesday morning.

 

Roel Loopers

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HAVE YOUR SAY ON HEART OF BEACONSFIELD DEVELOPMENT

 

190524 Davis Park structure plan resized

 

One of the key pieces in the plan to revitalise the Fremantle Heart of Beaconsfield has been released for public comment.

The Davis Park precinct is an area of 10 hectares of land bounded by South Street, Lefroy Road, Caesar Street and Fifth Avenue consisting of mostly state-owned social housing.

City of Fremantle Director of Strategic Planning Paul Garbett said the state government is looking to redevelop the area and has submitted a structure plan to guide the process.

“The state government through the Department of Communities has a policy to decentralise large pockets of social housing and redevelop the land to create a range of more diverse and affordable housing options,” Mr Garbett said.

“The Davis Park precinct currently contains around 260 dwellings that are fairly old, low-scale residential. These homes are accessed by a number of cul-de-sac roads, so connectivity with the surrounding neighbourhood is poor.

“For this reason the Department of Communities is keen to redevelop the Davis Park precinct to create a more diverse mix of housing, with both private and public housing and better connections to surrounding areas.

“The structure plan submitted by the Department of Communities shows details such as where roads and public open space will go, as well as types and locations of housing, community facilities and other land uses.

“As the authority responsible for local planning, the City of Fremantle’s role is to assess the plan and make a recommendation to the WA Planning Commission, which will make the final decision on whether the plan is approved or not.

“To help the City prepare its recommendation to the WAPC, we’d really like to hear from the local community and get some feedback on the structure plan.

“Community feedback at this stage is important because, although it doesn’t include details such as the design of new buildings, a structure plan does guide later stages of planning such as subdivision and development applications.”

The Davis Park structure plan proposes the creation of a mixed-use precinct along South Street, with retail, commercial and residential properties.

Public open space around Davis Park will be expanded and an innovation precinct will be established to provide opportunities for alternative housing styles.

Redevelopment of the Davis Park area is a key part of the broader Heart of Beaconsfield planning project, which will guide the redevelopment of surrounding areas like the Lefroy Road Quarry and the former South Metropolitan TAFE site.

An information stall will be set up at the Growers Green Farmers Markets at Fremantle College on Sunday 16 June, with the opportunity to speak with representatives from the Department of Communities and the City’s planning staff on the structure plan proposal.

For more information and to make a submission visit the City of Fremantle’s My Say Freo website. Public comments close on 21 June.

WHAT IS GOOD TASTE IN BUILDING DESIGN?

 

I think all of us who often complain about the mediocre new architecture we are getting in Fremantle should be delighted that the new DESIGN WA guidelines will apply from today on, but I am quite skeptical about the impact it will have, because good design is like good taste. It is very personal and hard to quantify.

Often when I have slammed the design of buildings others have commented they liked what I believed was atrocious architecture, so why would expert panels be any different in their different taste and preferences? Who dictates what good taste and good design is?

The new DESIGN WA guidelines are all about aesthetics and a review panel of 50 people will decide which planning proposal is in good taste and which one is not. The design review panel comprises of people from architecture, urban design, planning, and landscape architects plus more from heritage, public health, sustainability and engineering. It will be near impossible to reach consensus in such a big group I fear, so Chair Geoff Warn, who is the WA Government Architect, will have a big job ahead of him.

DESIGN WA has got rid of the controversial R-Code system applied up to now, so I wonder if Fremantle and other local councils will also do that. I’ll ask the Fremantle Planning Department if changes will be made in that regard.

I believe that our cities and communities deserve much better design than what we largely have been getting lately, especially for substantial apartment and office buildings. Retaining the tree canopy or providing significant numbers of trees and plants and creating much better streetscapes and public realm will be a very positive step forward. Let’s hope it can all be realised.

Roel Loopers

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