Freo's View

TEMPORARY HOUSING FOR HOMELESS IN NORTH FREO

 

There is an interesting development proposal that has a lot of merit before the Fremantle Planning Committee this evening.

Approval is sought for a temporary housing development as an interim use on disused land owned and reserved by the State Government for public transport (Railway) but currently not required for that purpose. The proposal involves 18 Self-contained single bedroom units to be managed by Foundation Housing.

Approval is sought for a housing development (18 Self-contained single bedroom units) to provide temporary housing (15 years) on land that is owned by the State Government and has been identified for long-term public transport uses. The proposal seeks to make use of (currently) surplus public land in suitable locations as an ‘interim use’ to provide housing for those in need through services offered by Foundation Housing. This initiative is known as ‘My Home’. Use of lightweight and ‘flat pack’ construction allows removal if and when the land is required for its reserved purpose.

Foundation Housing is a WA developer and manager of affordable housing for people in need. The ‘My Home’ is a new initiative to provide housing for homeless people at no cost to government. ‘My Home’ is a proposed 3-way partnership between government, not-for-profit and the private sector, and is based on the Housing First model.

This proposed development will be tenanted by homeless women over 55 years of age. Homeless people are from all walks of life, from many socio-economic backgrounds and all demographics. There is strong anecdotal evidence that a growing “hidden” group of people becoming homeless in Australia are single women aged over 55 years of age. Women in this age group may have spent many years raising children and are less likely to have accumulated sufficient superannuation to support themselves. Death of a spouse, divorce, lack of confidence to re-enter the workforce, outdated work skills and poor financial management all contribute to an older woman finding herself homeless.

Each unit is single storey in form and 30m2 in area with a bedroom, kitchen, living and bathroom space. There is also a shared laundry and storeroom facilities. The site is to be landscaped with vegetable gardens, fruit trees and outdoor living spaces. The development is to be configured in a side by side row housing design. Eight (8) communal car bays are provided for the development to the south of site.

Roel Loopers

WE DON’T BUILD COMMUNITIES. WE BUILD PLACES OF ISOLATION

 

There was an interesting panel discussion NO FIXED ADDRESS, to discuss the importance of social housing and building diversity in our urban centres, in the lovely courtyard of DADAA in Fremantle’s Princes May Park, last night with Dr. Mariana Atkins, Research Associate Professor, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia and the UWA Living Lab, Dr Holly Farley, Research Fellow, Fremantle School of Architecture, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Dr. Shane Greive, Urban and Regional Planning, School of Design and Built Environment, Curtin University, Michael Piu (CEO, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre), and  Heather Thompson (Senior Assertive Outreach Worker, 20 Lives 20 Homes Program, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre).  It was facilitated by Lisette Kaleveld, Senior Consultant, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia.

Changing cityscapes are inevitable with urban infill making places such as Fremantle desirable, especially since most of the services are provided in town, and that attracts a diversity of people, including homeless ones, and those who require social and affordable housing, but we are not designing and building for that diversity and the needs of individuals. Not many local governments have the capacity and desire to change with the times, so how do you design a city for all?

People want to be connected, be in contact with nature and there is a real disconnect there, so we need to bring the community on board because it is about the collective, not individuals. To do that we need to start understanding the history of Australia and the values, and where we want to go. We need to understand the diverse perspective, and need to learn to understand the different realities. Design should not be about excluding people!

Homelessness is nothing new and has been around for decades, so the whole community needs to own the issues and solutions, but there is a lack of value judgement. It is a fallacy that homeless people are in control of their own future! We all are only a few steps away from homelessness and if we come together the solutions are in our own hands. Start a conversation and humanise the issue!

A social worker said she had met some of the most amazing, caring and resilient people one would like to meet.

Architects and developers need to start actively listen to everybody’s stories from a design perspective. Bring the focus of development back to the people! We need a change of mindset there, as the next generation of home buyers can’t afford to buy the homes of the present generation. Inter-generational housing is not available, the housing options are not there.

There is huge value in diversity in a community, and we don’t want people with similar social/financial issues all living together, there needs to be a mix and we need to understand what home means for different people. Public housing often results in people failing because of the wrong set up and location and the lack of support. For some community housing or a boarding house is better because they don’t have to look after paying bills and connect with others. Community housing is more flexible.

There is also an interesting small exhibition in the DADAA gallery, so go and have a look at it!

COMMENT:

We don’t build communities, we build spaces where people are alone, spaces of loneliness, because at the lower end of the apartment market there are no community spaces where people can connect. There are no swimming pools, gyms, roof gardens, etc. We build highrise along transit corridors, instead of building them around green open spaces where people can meet and play.

There are tens of thousands of single middle aged and older women and men who have no social life because they can no longer afford to go to pubs, concerts, festivals, theatres, etc. where they used to connect with friends and meet new people. They don’t meet anyone and get isolated. High density living does not cater for that by providing community spaces. Many single people live in a small box with no communical spaces where they can meet their neighbours and make new friends that way.

Roel Loopers

HOUSING DIVERSITY PANEL AT DADAA

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, homelessness, housing, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on January 15, 2020

 

As the built landscape of Fremantle’s East End begins to change, a public panel will bring together not-for-profit organisations, urban planning experts, the St Pat’s community and artists to discuss the importance of social housing and building diversity in our urban centres.

It is on Thursday, January 23 from 6-8pm at DADAA in the former Boys School building at Princess May Park.

This public panel is presented as a part of DADAA’s No Fixed Address program, a collaborative project between Perth contemporary artists, filmmakers and the St Pat’s community, based in Fremantle’s East End. Exploring themes of resilience, adaptation and displacement, No Fixed Address responds to the social and built environments of this radically changing part of the city and the significant role St Pat’s holds within our community.

FREE | RSVP essential

The No Fixed Address exhibition will be open from 5pm.

PANEL SPEAKERS:
Dr. Mariana Atkins, Research Associate Professor, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia and the UWA Living Lab.

Dr. Shane Greive, Urban and Regional Planning, School of Design and Built Environment, Curtin University.

Michael Piu, CEO, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre.

Heather Thompson, Senior Assertive Outreach Worker, 20 Lives 20 Homes Program.

Facilitated by Lisette Kaleveld, Senior Consultant, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia.

More information: https://www.dadaa.org.au/gallery/nofixedaddress/

 

Roel Loopers

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QUICK LOOK AT FREO LONG TABLE PHOTOS

Posted in charity, christmas, city of fremantle, community, homelessness, st patricks, Uncategorized by freoview on November 28, 2019

 

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DELIGHTFUL FREO LONG TABLE

 

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The FREO LONG TABLE is my favourite event in Fremantle because it is everything Fremantle is. It is fun, food, wine, entertainment and charity. It is an evening where the Fremantle community comes together to have fun to support those who need a helping hand.

Proceeds for the heart-warming event go to St Patrick’s, so thank you so much to all the volunteers, businesses, sponsors, chefs and cooks and volunteers, and performers, and, and, and. You all make Freo the very special caring place it is!

Roel Loopers

 

Feel free to share these photos on social media. Just drag and drop them.

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EXHIBITION ABOUT GENTRIFICATION AT DADAA

Posted in art, city of fremantle, culture, homelessness, housing, Uncategorized by freoview on November 27, 2019

 

A very interesting exhibition No Fixed Address that explores survival tactics, social rituals and ways of moving within and occupying public space will open this Friday at the new DADAA gallery in the former Boys School at Fremantle’s Princess May Park.

Artists Olga Cironis, Janet Carter, Hannan Jones, Tanya Lee, Lincoln Mackinnon, Mike Moshos, Rebecca Riggs-Bennett, Susan Roux and Wade Taylor collaborated with homeless people and St Patrick’s staff for this show that will deal with the gentrification of the East End of Fremantle.

There will be an exhibition, workshops, public events, installations and films.

A Carpe Noctum walking tour will be held on the 30th of November and 9th of December from 8pm to explore who has the right to occupy our urban spaces after dark.

A penel discussion will be held about housing diversity on January 23 from 6pm.

The exhibition opens this Friday from 6-8pm at DADAA.

 

Roel Loopers

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FREO LONG TABLE CHARITY AUCTION

Posted in charity, city of fremantle, homelessness, st patricks, Uncategorized by freoview on November 18, 2019

 

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It is close to Silent Night… and one should never be silent about the plight of our homeless and disadvantaged people, but a SILENT AUCTION is all together a different form of silence where one can make a difference and support charity while bidding on something special.

St Patrick’s LONG TABLE DINNER silent auction is on:

Whether it’s a weekend away you’re after; a new piece of art for the front room; or some signed Dockers gear for your loved one’s Christmas gift, the Freo Long Table Dinner charity auction has something for everyone and is NOW OPEN! All proceeds go directly to St Pat’s to help us in our mission to end homelessness in Fremantle and surrounds. Check it out: www.myminiauction.com/stpats

Thank you to all the amazing and generous local business, artists and the community who donated.

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TICKETS FOR THE BEST EVENT IN THE WEST!

Posted in city of fremantle, community, event, food, homelessness, social services, st patricks, Uncategorized by freoview on September 2, 2019

 

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Have you got your tickets for the Freo Long Table?

Don’t wait too long or they will all be sold and you really don’t want to miss the very best event in Fremantle and the whole of Western Australia.

Order your tickets today-NOW! at:  http://www.fremantlelongtable.com.au

Roel Loopers

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GO LISTEN TO THE STORIES OF THE HOMELESS IN FREO TODAY

Posted in city of fremantle, homelessness, social services, st patricks, Uncategorized by freoview on August 9, 2019

 

An event to put a human face on homelessness will be held in Fremantle TODAY between 10-12 am in the High Street Mall as part of Homelessness Week.

Couch Conversations – a collaboration between St Patrick’s Community Support Centre, Uniting Care West and the City of Fremantle – will feature ten people with lived experience of homelessness who will be willing and available to share their stories with people passing by.

St Pats Chief Executive Michael Piu said a similar event held last year was a very positive experience for everyone involved.

“One of the common things we hear from people who are homeless is that they feel invisible and ignored – that people just walk past and look the other way,” Mr Piu said.

Couch Conversations is a great way to show that people who are homeless are real people with real stories to tell. The aim is to increase awareness of the issue, what is being done to reduce homelessness in Fremantle and how people can help out.

Couch Conversations follows the launch earlier this week of the 20 Lives 20 Homes program, which is two-year initiative to provide housing and wrap-around support to people sleeping rough in Fremantle.

The program will be coordinated by Ruah Community Services in conjunction with St Pats, Fremantle Foundation and the City of Fremantle.

Almost $1 million has been raised by the private sector to support the program, with the state government contributing $395,000 over two years and the City of Fremantle committing $40,000 this year with a further $40,000 proposed for next year.

Roel Loopers

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WHY PEOPLE BECOME HOMELESS

Posted in city of fremantle, homelessness, social services, st patricks, Uncategorized by freoview on August 8, 2019

 

Friday 10-12 mall talks

 

 

COUCH CONVOS is on tomorrow-Friday in the Fremantle High Street mall between 10-12am and will help people to get over some of the ignorance about homelessness.

People who have been homeless will talk about their experience; how they got there, how they coped with it and what the challenges were and are.

Many homeless people have mental health issues and far too many of those who sleep on the street are only in their teens.

Take the time to go and listen and engage with homeless people and don’t judge them as being the enemies of our society. Homelessness is a very serious social issue that needs priority in our governments as it is not acceptable that so many thousands of people have to sleep rough every night.

Roel Loopers

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