Freo's View

FREMANTLE TO GET NEW TRAFFIC BRIDGE

Posted in city of fremantle, freight, fremantle ports, state government, Uncategorized by freoview on April 22, 2019

 

The WA State Government today announced they will be spending $ 230 million on replacing the ailing Fremantle Traffic Bridge. Work is planned to start within three years.

This comes timely after Westport Taskforce chair Nicole Lockwood recently stated that it looks like the best location for a new port will be at Kwinana, once Fremantle Ports reaches capacity, and that is still 15-20 years away according to experts.

There has been a strong reduction in freight on road and an increase of freight on rail since the latter was subsidised by the State Government, but there are still many days where the port is near empty.

Nicole Lockwood said that environmental concerns for a Kwinana Port could be dealt with by modern construction of a wharf on pylons, rather than a full concrete development that would do more damage to Cockburn Sound.

Roel Loopers

 

FREMANTLE BEST LOCATION FOR ABORIGINAL CENTRE

 

“It is well beyond our capacity of funding” said Councillor Andrew Sullivan about the Council agenda item to do a $ 50.000 feasibility study for a Fremantle Aboriginal Cultural Centre at the preferred J Shed location at Bathers Beach.

And that is unfortunately the huge problem, because indications from the WA State Government are that they want to built the Aboriginal centre in Perth, ideally in Burswood, the electorate of Ben Wyatt, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and the Treasurer.

While I would absolutely love to have an Aboriginal Centre in Fremantle, and have been calling for it for many years, I believe it is unrealistic for the City of Fremantle to do a feasibility study before getting funding commitment from the State. Should we spend $ 50,000 of ratepayers money on what might only be a pipe dream that will never be realised because the State Government is so bloody Perth-centric?

If I were wealthy I would be very happy to donate my own money for an Aboriginal Centre in Freo because the story of our indigenous people needs to be told, and international tourists need to and want to have an Aboriginal experience.

Now how can we convince the Premier and Cabinet that Fremantle deserves another tourist attraction?

Roel Loopers

TODAY TONIGHT FILMING ARTHUR’S HEAD NEGLECT

 

 

A team from Channel Seven-Today Tonight spent most of the morning in Fremantle to film a story about the neglect of historic Arthur’s Head and WAs oldest public building the Roundhouse.

They interviewed a structural engineer about stabilisation solutions for the rockfall problem and a Roundhouse tourguide about the historic significance of the area.

It will be screened tomorrow, Wednesday at 6.30pm so make sure to watch it, and hopefully WA State politicians will watch it as well and put their hands in their pockets and fund the essential maintenance and repairs as a priority.

Send an email to Heritage Minister David Templeman, Premier Mark McGowan, Tourism Minister Paul Papalia and Member for Fremantle Simone McGurk, and urge them to preserve one of Western Australia’s most significant historic precincts!

Roel Loopers

MINISTER DOES NOT WANT FREMANTLE ABORIGINAL CENTRE

 

Roundhouse

 

I rest my case about the WA State Government being Perth-centric. The West Australian today published an “exclusive” by Peter de Kruijff about the money needed to maintain the Fremantle Roundhouse and historic Arthur’s Head and that the City of Fremantle wants to do a feasibility study for the creation of an Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Bathers Beach.

But Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt hits that straight on the head by stating that an Aborigonal Cultural Centre should be as close to the centre of Perth as feasible. Why?

Fremantle was the first point of contact between the Whadjuk Noongar people and the British settlers and surely the second city in Western Australia deserves a new tourist attraction, when Perth got Elizabeth Quay, the new WA Museum, the Burswood Stadium, etc.

The question now is if Fremantle should be spending $ 50,000 on a feasibility study when it appears unlikely they will get financial support from the State Government, and two Aboriginal centres would probably not a good idea either.

I would love to see a significant Aboriginal Cultural Centre in Freo, but the City is financially not doing well at all, so should they spend $ 50,000 of ratepayers money for something that is unlikely to be built in Fremantle?

Roel Loopers

 

HERALD ARTICLE STRESSES LACK OF GOVERNMENT SUPPORT FOR HISTORIC ARTHUR’S HEAD

 

 

Herald

 

This Thinking Allowed published in the Fremantle Herald today claims I am “Freo’s most opinionated blogger” so I’ll take that as a compliment I think, well, maybe. 😩

It is important though to stress the fact that the historic Roundhouse and Arthur’s Head do not get any annual funding from the State and Federal governments and that the City of Fremantle does not have the millions needed to properly maintain the heritage precinct.

Also in the Herald the not very good financial state of our city, so make sure to grab your copy of our Chook.

Roel Loopers

 

Henty ad

URGENT CARE NEEDED FOR FREMANTLE ROUNDHOUSE

 

round house- arthur head

 

While the possibility of a brand new Aboriginal cultural centre at Fremantle’s Arthur’s Head would be great the entire area needs a lot of TLC and large financial investment, as the officers’ report in the FPOL Committee agenda for this Wednesday shows.

As a volunteer at the Roundhouse and someone who visits Arthur’s Head daily I have found the neglect of the heritage precinct a disgrace and an insult to our history. If we do not respect the past we ignore our roots and that is not acceptable to me.

A few months ago I questioned in a letter to the West Australian and on Freo’s View why the Roundhouse, Western Australia’s oldest public building, does not receive annual funding from the State and Federal governments, and that extends to entire Arthur’s Head, because a city with a small ratepayers’ base like Fremantle simply does not have the money required to properly maintain the old building and limestone cliff area. That needs to change with urgency and priority!

Here some of what the FPOL agenda states:

The condition of the cliff faces and man-made walls at Arthur Head Reserve were found to range from poor to good. The recommended remediation for different areas varies from minor works such as removal of vegetation and repairs such as repointing of existing masonry walls through to major works including the extension of the Whaler’s Tunnel portal in areas where there is significant potential for collapse and risk of harm to visitors.

The condition of the limestone walls of the Round House has been deteriorating for some time. Major conservation and restoration work is required to maintain this important historical building.

Previous conservation and stabilisation works undertaken between 2001 and 2018 were completed in a piecemeal manner. Some of these works included shaving the cliff faces to address safety issues of rock fall did not consider or address the issue of erosion and only accelerated the retreating of the cliff face towards some significant heritage buildings.

The Round House which is recognised as being Western Australia’s oldest public building and is one of this State’s most significant heritage buildings is one of the biggest attractions in Fremantle with an estimated 100,000 persons per year visiting the building annually.

The last major conservation works of the Round House were undertaken in 2004. Since then small amount of maintenance works have been carried out each year under the City’s building maintenance budget.

Due to the exposed marine environment, vandalism and the well-intentioned but damaging repairs carried out during the twentieth century the building is now in need of some urgent conservation works. In particular, works are urgently required for the remediation and repair of the limestone walls.

Given the heritage significance of Arthur Head and its buildings, a long term solution to stop the erosion of the cliff faces and repair of the Round House walls is required to ensure that the assets in the Arthur Head Reserve survive for future generations to enjoy.

The pre-tender estimate completed in March 2019 which was developed from the completed designs and contract documentation indicates the total project cost for all remediation works to the cliff faces to be in the order of $1.8 million (Exc. GST).

The remediation works can be undertaken in stages which could be sequenced based on risk.

The conservation and remediation works to the Round House are estimated at between $500 000 and $1 000 000.

I am surprised that the officers put an estimation of 100,000 visitors for the Roundhouse as the exact visitors numbers are available. They are recorded each and every day by the team leader of the day, who has a clicker counter to record everyone who enters the Roundhouse and that comes to 140,000 -150,000 annually, which is well above the estimated number.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE HOSPITAL NEW LOCATION FOR GENERAL DENTAL CLINIC

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, health, state government, Uncategorized by freoview on April 2, 2019

 

The Fremantle General Dental Clinic has now moved to Fremantle Hospital after the WA State Government spent $ 2.99 million on the relocation of the clinic, which was on the corner of Parry Street.

The service has not only been relocated but improved and expanded.

The new clinic has nine treatment rooms, a dental laboratory, sterilisation areas and staff support rooms. It will offer patients:

  • Dental examinations and assessments;
  • Radiographic examinations and interpretation;
  • Preventive and prophylactic services;
  • Periodontics;
  • Extractions and minor oral surgery procedures; and
  • Fillings, dentures and some crown and bridge services.

Dental care in the new Fremantle Hospital clinic is only available to eligible patients, such a people who have a Pensioner or Health Care Card,

Roel Loopers

MELVILLE WAVE PARK REJECTION SIMILAR TO FREO’S J SHED TAVERN

 

The rejection by the State Government of the proposed wave park in the City of Melville is a huge win for the community there and has a lot in common with the State’s rejection of the planned tavern at J Shed on Fremantle’s Bathers Beach.

It is quite intriguing to notice that both local councils approved the controversial plans against huge community opposition and outrage and that even the community votes at special electors meetings were ignored.

One has to wonder also about the proposed location of a wave park in Melville that is just a 20-minute drive to Fremantle beaches. From memory there has even been an application for a small wave park near Port Beach, which makes even less sense.

It is nice to notice that the planning approval process, that is often criticised, worked well in both instances and that inappropriate uses of crown land were rejected by the State.

Roel Loopers

THANK THE LAW MY SISTER DIED WITH DIGNITY

 

Last night our time my oldest sister Marja died in the Netherlands. She was euthanised.

I am not sharing this with you because of narcissism but because the Western Australian government also want to legalise doctor assisted dying and I believe that is a very humane intent. There are community information sessions and community consultation and a very long online survey that took me 20 minutes, but is worth doing.

I am so grateful that my sister died in her own bed in her own home and with dignity and that she had plenty of time to receive family and friends and say goodbye.

The process she had to go through was lengthy and very thorough before an expert committee decided that she was eligible for euthanasia.

Legalising assisted dying is about giving people a choice instead of forcing them to commit suicide in awful and very lonely ways. It should not be politicised or being kidnapped by religious leaders.

There is no threat to religious or cultural values. No one can be forced to be euthanised and neither can doctors be forced to administer it. In my sister’s case her new doctor-the old one had retired-told her it was too early in his young career to feel comfortable assisting her so she was referred to an older colleague.

My sister Marja was assessed on her health and mental health by different practitioners who wrote reports which were considered by an independent panel. There was nothing easy or flippant about that process and not at all what some panel members at last year’s Notre Dame university forum claimed.

Call me an old cynic, but it comes as no surprise to me that the billion dollar age care industry and the billion dollar palliative care industry are against euthanasia, and so are those who believe that only a god can take a life. For those of us who are not religious the promise of heaven, paradise or nirvana is irrelevant, but euthanasia is our pragmatic and humane choice if life is coming to a painful, slow and unstoppable end. We don’t let animals suffer, so why not apply the same compassion to human beings.

It is astounding how unprepared we are for death. It is the elephant in the room that not many people want to talk about. We are not taught how to deal with it, so at the end we try to deal with it the best we can with empathy. I was lucky to be able to Skype with my sister often over the last couple of months and that was good for both of us.

Marja was just three years older than I am and was always there for me. She had inoperable cancer. I am so grateful that she was allowed to die with dignity. All her pain and worries are now over.

Roel Loopers

NOMINATIONS FOR HERITAGE COUNCIL

 

Heritage Minister David Templeman today announced nominations are being sought from experienced and qualified individuals to become members of the Heritage Council of Western Australia.

As the State Government’s expert body on heritage matters, the Heritage Council plays a key role in decisions on entries into the State Register of Heritage Places and the development of these places. It also determines State Heritage strategy and policies.

High calibre women and men from a diversity of fields and backgrounds with relevant skills and experience are strongly encouraged to express their interest in this rewarding opportunity.

The Heritage Act 2018 sets out criteria that must be met in terms of skills and expertise, moving away from the previous Act’s requirement that council members represent certain interests or groups.

The McGowan Government is committed to gender parity across government boards and committees.

More details on membership requirements and the process for nominating can be found on the Heritage Council’s website at http://www.stateheritage.wa.gov.au

Application packages are also available through the Heritage Council’s website or by contacting the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage on (08) 6551 8002.

Applications close on May 3, 2019.

Comments Off on NOMINATIONS FOR HERITAGE COUNCIL

%d bloggers like this: