Freo's View

PORT BIENNALE SIGNS OF OUR TIME

Posted in art, Fremantle Biennale, fremantle ports, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on November 8, 2019

 

 

I had a walk around Victoria Quay this morning to look at more of the Sam Bloor Billboard Project for the Fremantle Biennale 2019.

While there I bumped into my old mate John Malaga, the project supervisor of Fremantle Ports, who was watering the palm tree that is also part of the Biennale.

The container show is also on Victoria Quay and shows how much the containerisation of the ports changed the way we handle freight.

Roel Loopers

MARITIME DAY AT FREMANTLE PORT TODAY

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle ports, maritime, navy, Uncategorized by freoview on November 2, 2019

Nov 2. Maritime Day

 

The annual Fremantle Ports MARITIME DAY is on Victoria Quay from 10am till 4pm today so go and enjoy the Navy band, the Sheean submarine, boat rides , stalls, big container trucks, the container exhibitions, etc.

It is a fun day and a good way to express our support for the working Fremantle Port. See you there!

Roel Loopers

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MARITIME DAY AT FREMANTLE PORT ON SATURDAY

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle ports, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on October 28, 2019

 

Nov 2. Maritime Day

 

The annual Fremantle Ports MARITIME DAY is on again this Saturday November 2  from 10am to 4pm, so make sure to head out to Victoria Quay.

There will be harbour rides, marching bands, a Royal Navy submarine and lots of other things to see, enjoy and do.

Entry to the Maritime Museum will only be a gold coin donation on the day so that is well worth a visit.

Roel Loopers

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BEAUTIFUL MORNING AT FREMANTLE PORT

 

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As everyone who reads Freo’s View should know by now I absolutely love the working Fremantle Port, so when I got there this morning for my Saturday morning coffee with my mate Henty at the Express Cafe at B Shed I just had to take photos of the departing container ship just before 7am.

There were heaps of young people on their way to Rottnest Island which always makes me feel I am on holiday.

Roel Loopers

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LEADERSHIP PERSPECTIVES ON FREMANTLE

 

FCC Leaders Lunch

 

The Fremantle Chamber of Commerce Leaders’ Lunch  with the topic Leadership Perspectives on Fremantle on Friday the 18th of October sounds like a very interesting one to attend.

It is at the Esplanade Hotel from 12.30 till 3pm and will have following speakers:

Matthew McNeilly, managing director of Sirona Capital, Julian Smith, Pro Vice Chancellor of Notre Dame University, Eve Clark, managing director of L3Harris, Brodie Carr, managing director of Tourism WA, and Geoffry London, Professor of Architecture at UWA.

Tickets are $ 110 for members and $ 125 for non member. Bookings at http://www.fremantlechamber.com.au/events.

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE PORTS WANT A SHED ACTIVATION

Posted in city of fremantle, cruiseliners, development, fremantle ports, heritage, Uncategorized by freoview on October 9, 2019

 

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Fremantle Ports is looking for Expressions of Interest for the redevelopment of historic A Shed on Victoria Quay.

The 2,225 sqm building is the closest one to the very popular Maritime Museum and a short walk to the B Shed Rottnest Island ferry terminal, so perfect for tourist and leisure orientated development.

I am really happy that Fremantle Port finally wants to reactivate A Shed as it has been forlorn and neglected for far too long.

EOI close on November 29 so don’t miss out to make A Shed great again.

Roel Loopers

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COUNCIL WANTS TO KEEP OUR TWO WORKING PORTS

 

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Fremantle Council wants the Fishing Boat Harbour to continue to operate as an authentic working harbour according to a position statement endorsed by Council on Wednesday evening.

The council adopted the statement to confirm its position in relation to future planning processes and development at the harbour.

The leaseholders of the Boat Lifters site at 38 Mews Road, next to the Little Creatures Brewery, are currently exploring redevelopment options for the site and the adjoining Sardine Wharf.

As part of their ‘Harbour Connect’ project AMB Capital Partners, a company owned by the Bennett family, have flagged a development that may involve a range of new land uses, including commercial, retail, accommodation and residential uses.

The Department of Transport has also sought the City of Fremantle’s input into a possible review of the vision for the harbour and the principles that would guide any future redevelopment.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt said Fishing Boat Harbour was a vital part of Fremantle, both as a base for fishing and marine industries and as a visitor destination.

“The Fremantle Council is supportive of investment and any appropriate new development to sustain Fishing Boat Harbour into the future,” Mayor Pettitt said.

“However, there is no question that the harbour should continue to operate as a working harbour with fishing fleet-related and other marine industries, as these industries are essential to the retention of an authentic port attraction and visitor experience for the greater Fremantle area.

“Infrastructure and services to support ongoing use of the harbour by commercial and recreational vessels, including the boat lifting facilities, should either be maintained or replaced elsewhere within Fishing Boat Harbour if the existing facilities are affected by development proposals.

“Any proposal to introduce noise sensitive land uses like short or long stay accommodation should be limited in scale, and should only be permitted if the ongoing operations of the working harbour are legally protected.”

The council’s position statement also states Fishing Boat Harbour should be recognised as an important component of the Fremantle city centre and should not be treated as an isolated precinct.

Commercial and retail uses not directly related to maritime industries or needing a harbour location should complement, not draw away, investment from the city centre.

Any new development should respond to existing context and sense of place, and harmonise with the traditional low profile industrial character of the area.

Some additional building height could be entertained as part of a major development provided it could be demonstrated the development would deliver significant public benefits.

The council has also called for no net loss of parking in the area, key connections and vistas to be retained, connection to the Esplanade, Bathers Beach and the waterfront to be improved and the extension of Norfolk Street to be pursued as a the primary entrance to the harbour.

The Boat Lifters site is Crown Land reserved under the Metropolitan Region Scheme for Public Purposes (Special Use), so approval of any development under the City’s local planning scheme is not required. Approval by state planning authorities would be required.

 

Roel Loopers

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CHALLENGING FREMANTLE PORT FUTURE

Posted in city of fremantle, city planning, freight, fremantle ports, maritime, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on September 19, 2019

 

The protest yesterday by the MUA-Maritime Union of Australia in front of Minister Simone McGurk’s office in Fremantle made me wonder why the union is not engaged in finding solutions.

It is by now well known that Fremantle Port can easily handle many more containers and could remain a working port for another 20-25 years, but that the issues are with how freight gets to and from the port, so has the MUA offered any ideas on how to solve that?

Why does MUA’s Chris Cain not sit down with Fremantle Ports, the trucking and stevedore companies and try to find solutions so that they get the people in North Fremantle and near Leach highway on their side?

I am always skeptical about a layperson offering quick solutions, so my suggestions are merely meant to be the start of a discussion among the experts.

Why not demand, or even enforce, 24/7 freight on road, more after business hours movement, so that there is less congestion during the day time?

Why not encourage or enforce that trucks can not arrive empty to pick up containers, but also have to deliver on the same trip? That might require more computerised collaboration between trucking companies, but it would make freight by road more efficient and hence more cost efficient. A win win for all.

Trucks that can only transport one single container should be banned as it is inefficient and clogs up roads. Coming back from the dentist yesterday I was at a North Fremantle traffic light where I saw nine trucks coming through and all of them just carrying one container. That is silly.

More freight on rail is also helpful but there is an issue with noise and vibration for people in the west end of Fremantle, and the current line cannot handle double stacking, so growth is limited even when a new bridge is built.

Fremantle Port is one of the most efficient ports in Australia so the MUA members clearly know what they are doing, so they should put their considerable experience toward trying to make the freight part of the operation more efficient and less of a burden on the local community.

And one more word to Chris Cain and his threat that the Member for Fremantle will be gone at the next election. Do you really believe that Lisa-I should think before I speak-Harvey and Bill-I must have been absent when God handed out brains-Marmion will be more supportive of the MUA than the current government?

Simone McGurk is a very hard working and excellent minister who has some very challenging portfolios, such as child protection and domestic violence. She does not deserve the MUA threat.

I love the working port and hope it will remain for a very long time, but consideration must also be given to the residents in North Fremantle and along the road and rail freight corridors, so it is a much bigger issue than just jobs for wharfies.  The MUA should be pro-active in investigation which kind of new jobs a new port might have to offer and assist in retraining some of their members.

But there is no need for panic as a new port if built at Kwinana will be a very slow and long process, and Chris Cain will long have retired by then and I will be long dead.

Roel Loopers

MUA WANTS FREMANTLE PORT TO STAY

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle ports, maritime, state government, Uncategorized, unions by freoview on September 18, 2019

 

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The Maritime Union of Australia-MUA protested early this morning outside the office of Member for Fremantle Simone McGurk in Fremantle’s Market Street.

The MUA is not at al happy that the state government has been investigating through the Westport Taskforce what the future of Fremantle Port will be, with the preferred option a move to a new port at Kwinana.

The loud protest heard MUA branch secretary Chris Cain warn Simone McGurk that she will be gone at the next election.

The MUA is clearly worried about wharfies losing jobs at an automated new port, but the reality is that even if the state government decides to build a very expensive new port in Cockburn Sound it will take at least 15 years for it to be realised and replace our Freo port.

Roel Loopers

 

THE FUTURE OF FREO’S FISHING BOAT HARBOUR

 

The Strategic Planning and Transport Committee of Fremantle Council will on Wednesday consider the City’s position on the Fishing Boat Harbour and probable future development in the precinct.

The Officer’s Recommendation for Councillors to consider is:

OFFICER’S RECOMMENDATION

Council:

1. Adopts the following as a statement of its current position in respect of the future of Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour:

  1. The Council recognises the Fishing Boat Harbour as a vital part of Fremantle City Centre, both in terms of its function as an employment and activity centre and visitor destination, and is supportive of investment and appropriate new development to sustain the harbour into the future. This can be most effectively achieved through the preparation of a comprehensive up-to-date plan for the whole of the Fishing Boat Harbour to guide investment, activities and development.
  2. The harbour should be recognised as a component of the Fremantle City Centre, and as a part of the state’s marine network. It should not be treated as an isolated precinct.
  3. The harbour should continue to operate as an authentic working harbour with fishing fleet-related and other marine industries.
  4. Landside infrastructure and services to support ongoing use of the harbour by a range of commercial and recreational vessels (including boat lifting facilities with no less lifting capacity than current facilities) should be maintained, or suitably replaced if existing facilities/services are affected by development proposals. Review and redefinition of necessary infrastructure in collaboration with the fishing fleet industry should occur.
  5. Management of land uses within the harbour to minimise conflict and contain non-marine uses (such as entertainment and tourism uses) should continue. The harbour ‘zones’ defined in policy DGF10 should be used as a starting point for guiding land use locations, but with some flexibility.
  6. Any proposal to introduce noise sensitive land uses (e.g. short or long stay accommodation) should acknowledge the primacy of the working harbour function, and demonstrate provisions to manage any potential conflict (for example built form noise mitigation measures, management arrangements, title/lease notifications).
  7. Employment-generating uses not directly related to maritime industries and/or needing a harbour location should complement, not draw away, investment in the Fremantle City Centre core. Specifically, retail and office uses should only be supported where they are directly related and/or incidental to the primary marine or tourism related use. Convenience retailing should not be supported.
  1. Built form in any new development should respond to existing context and sense of place, and harmonise with the traditional low profile coarse grain industrial character of the area (whilst still making adequate provision for pedestrians and passive surveillance). Views to and connection with the water from the public realm should be provided. Some additional height beyond the typical height of existing harbour buildings could be entertained on a single key site if a development could demonstrably deliver significant public benefits and amenity in the vicinity.
  2. Any substantial new development proposal (particularly anything large scale) should be subject to formal design review (potentially by the State Design Review Panel).
  3. Coordinated improvement of the public domain to establish a more coordinated and amenable pedestrian and cycling environment is supported. Any redevelopment of the public domain should avoid a net loss of parking (incorporating nodal parking provided at the entrance).
  4. Key connections and vistas should be retained and reinforced. Connection to the Esplanade, Bathers Beach and to the waterfront should be improved and made more legible. Extension of Norfolk Street should be pursued as the primary entrance to the harbour.
  5. Establishment of public infrastructure necessary to facilitate improvement of the harbour and funding and contribution mechanisms to achieve these should occur as a priority to ensure a coordinated and equitable approach. This should involve contribution to Norfolk St extension/relocated railway crossing, public realm enhancements and waterfront access.
  6. Car parking provision and management should recognise the different needs of different harbour user groups. Day tourists and visitors to the harbour should be provided with a consolidated parking venue/s at or near the entrance/s to the harbour (potentially supported by cash in lieu payments for new development) and encouraged to walk into it rather than seek parking within the precinct. Conversely the operational requirements of marine industries and maritime activities need to be accommodated within the harbour.
  7. Any significant expansion of tourism function or introduction of residential uses should incorporate or facilitate a high quality area of open space including green elements.

2. Notes continued officer participation in the process of Fishing Boat Harbour visioning and policy review and in doing so officers will advance Council’s position outlined in (1) above.

Roel Loopers

 

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