Freo's View

FREMANTLE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT UPDATE

 

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Good signs for Fremantle! The M/27 residential development by the Match group of the former Energy Museum at Parry Street is getting closer to realisation with only seven units left, so pre-sales have been going well.

The Yolk property group have also indicated they will be starting soon on the Little Lane residential development on the former Spotlight site next to Target, so that would be two major residential developments in the hart of the Freo CBD.

Roel Loopers

PEOPLE WOULD LIKE TO LIVE IN FREO

Posted in city of fremantle, lifestyle, living, local government, property, Uncategorized by freoview on September 19, 2019

 

Some people will again accuse me if wearing rose-coloured glasses but the Great WA Home Survey, according to the West Australian newspaper have come out that Fremantle is fifth on the list of If Money Is No Issue Where Would You Live?

Fremantle came 5th with 10.3%, while Cottesloe was top of the list with 20.9%, City Beach came 2nd with 18.5% and South Perth 3rd with 16.1%

So while some Freo people whinge about a lot of things people in other suburbs still believe Fremantle is a desirable location to live in, and I could not agree more. I love Freo!

Roel Loopers

PERTH WANTS WHAT FREMANTLE ALREADY HAS

 

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It is interesting to note that while a small group of Freo people do not like Notre Dame University in Fremantle’s historic West End the biggest retailers and property owners in Perth have called for more residential apartments and a big university for the inner city there to boost trade and stop the decline in retail.

Many cafes in Freo’s CBD would not survive without the patronage of NDA students and staff and the vibrancy it brings to the West End during the day should not be underestimated.

That does not mean there is no room for improvement and Notre Dame really needs to get serious about providing student accommodation so that more of them will live in Fremantle and become a real part of our community.

The new masterplan they are developing might be a good way forward to activate the street level of NDA buildings and open the courtyards for more community events.

Roel Loopers

 

FREMANTLE BACK YARDS

Posted in beaconsfield, city of fremantle, home, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on August 26, 2019

 

 

I love it that the sun is out in Fremantle and that winter will come to an end this week. Wildflowers are already popping up and thank heavens it is finally getting warmer. I do not like the cold!

A couple of photos I took of two backyards in Beacy.

Roel Loopers

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COUNCIL CHANGES TO HILTON FENCING POLICY

 

Fremantle Council’s Strategic Planning and Transport Committee will this Wednesday consider changes to the fencing policy for the suburb of Hilton, so this is what the Officer’s Recommendation is:

Note the outcomes of the community consultation on the proposed changes to Local Planning Policy 3.7, as detailed in agenda Attachment 1.2.

Adopt the following amendments to clause 1.5 of Local Planning Policy 3.7: Hilton Garden Suburb Heritage Area, in accordance with Schedule 2, Clause 4 (3) of the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015:1.5 Street Walls and Fences 1.5.1 Street walls and fencing forward of the building line shall be a maximum height of 1.2 metres and shall be a minimum of 30% visually permeable above 300 millimetres.

For properties located on the following streets, front fencing shall be visually permeable above 1.2 metres to a maximum height of 1.8 metres, with piers no higher than 2.0 metres:• South Street, between Stock Road and Lee Avenue.• Carrington Street, between South Street and Winterfold Road. • Winterfold Road, between Carrington Street and Collick Street.

Solid masonry (brick) rear fencing shall be permitted for those properties backing onto Stock Road to a maximum height of 2.0 metres.

Council may, at its discretion, vary the requirements of clause 1.5.1 where it is satisfied that the proposed street wall and/or fence: a. Is consistent with character of the prevailing streetscape (including, in relation to this clause only, the house directly across the street and the three houses on either side of that opposing house, where these are located within the Hilton Heritage Areas) AND maintains clear surveillance between the street and the dwelling; orb. is a maximum of 1.5m in height and a minimum of 50% visually permeable. Notwithstanding the above, visually impermeable fencing above 300 millimeters in height will not be supported.

Fencing with a high proportion of visual permeability and reflective of fencing styles and materials traditional to the area (primarily post and wire/mesh infill) is strongly encouraged.

Roel Loopers

 

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BEACY HOME OF MANY ANGLES

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on August 19, 2019

 

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No, this photo was not taken somewhere in the south of Europe but in McCleery Street, Beaconsfield. All those angles just fascinated me when I walked past it today.

Roel Loopers

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LOOPY LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME

Posted in city of fremantle, home, lifestyle, living, real estate, rent, Uncategorized by freoview on July 31, 2019

 

The few critics I have in Fremantle claim that my life is all about narcissistic me and my huge ego, so I might as well prove them right and do a call out on my own behalf for a change.

I need to move out as my landlord is coming back from France and will take over the cozy little Beaconsfield cave I have been living in for last three and a half years, so I am looking for an unfurnished small apartment, townhouse, granny flat, etc. in Fremantle.

Any help appreciated so please share this with your network.

Any tips please email me: roel.loopers@iinet.net.au

Roel Loopers

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QUARRY STREET DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES

 

The first item on Wednesday’s Fremantle Council Strategic Planning and Transport Committee is an interesting and challenging one because it is about the City-owned properties 9-15 Quarry Street.

Proposals for the development of the sites have been controversial and not to the liking of local residents who want to retain the low-rise streetscape on the southern side of Quarry Street while it is more likeley that developers would want to build medium to high density there.

The officers recommend to:

Introduction of a uniform zoning of Mixed Use and residential density of R80 with a plot ratio of up to 1, across the lots.

Introduction of specific building height limits and setbacks, to reflect the site’s location and facilitate a transition between high and low density.

Introduction of policy controls to include specific boundary wall, overshadowing, interface and pedestrian access link controls.

Councillors and staff held an on-side workshop on April 1 this year and the agenda state that:

The following broad parameters were discussed at the informal Councillor workshop:

Priority for residential land use given the need to encourage more people to live near central Fremantle, without excluding the potential for a modest mixed use component;

A residential coding of a medium-high density (achieving an equal or greater yield to that under current zoning – previously estimated around 34 dwelling units – refer to December 2018 report);

Diversity of dwelling types is preferred but should not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

Building height up to 4 storeys (reflective of provisions already applicable to Lots 2 and 1 and its associated sub-area) in the centre of the site with lesser heights on the boundaries with existing low density residential (including that to the south-west);

A higher quality design outcome is desired on site, as far as this can be achieved through traditional planning processes (noting the much stronger emphasis on this aspect established in the new R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA);

Existing vegetation should be encouraged to be retained but not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

There should be specific provision on where boundary walls should be permitted, along with minimum setbacks for upper floors to limit bulk and overshadowing on neighbouring properties;

Pedestrian access should be incorporated through the site to provide a connection to Fremantle Park and to potentially activate the ‘dead’ corner at the back of the site

The site walk-around reinforced local community concerns about excessive bulk and height, impacts on amenity, the suitability of the site to accommodate non-residential uses and concerns about design quality. Support was expressed for the proposed pedestrian connection into Fremantle Park.

There have been suggestions made to use the sites for age-care and affordable housing and Slavin Architects released plans on how good low-rise development could be achieved at Quarry Street.

The sites are very well located close to the railway station, high frequency buses, the Leisure Centre and Arts Centre, shopping, schools, Fremantle Park, Princess May Park, etc.

It will have to be seen if developers are interested at all as there are a lot of apartments still vacant at Heirloom and LIV and the proposed Hilton development could not manage any pre-sales of the apartments on offer there.

The residential development of the former  Energy Museum, which is very close to 9-15 Quarry Street has also not eventuated although the Match group has stated it will go ahead with it.

Any other ideas for the sites? Share it with the Freo community!

Roel Loopers

ENJOY THE WA DAY SUNDAY

 

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It is going to be a beautiful mild Sunday so go out and explore gorgeous Fremantle.

The Growers Green Farmers Market is on at Fremantle College on Lefroy Road till midday for fresh fruit and vegetables, bread, pastries, yummy breakfast, lunch and coffee.

All the cafes and restaurants around Freo are open today, but some will be closed tomorrow, so take advantage of that, and the Fremantle Markets and E Shed Markets are open, as are Fremantle Prison, the Roundhouse, Shipwrecks Museum and Maritime Museum.

And at the Fishing Boat Harbour the WA DAY Festival is on all day till 8pm.

There really is no excuse to stay home, so grab the kids, the dog and hubby and head out to be part of our great Freo community.

Have fun!

Roel Loopers

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HAVE YOUR SAY ON HEART OF BEACONSFIELD DEVELOPMENT

 

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One of the key pieces in the plan to revitalise the Fremantle Heart of Beaconsfield has been released for public comment.

The Davis Park precinct is an area of 10 hectares of land bounded by South Street, Lefroy Road, Caesar Street and Fifth Avenue consisting of mostly state-owned social housing.

City of Fremantle Director of Strategic Planning Paul Garbett said the state government is looking to redevelop the area and has submitted a structure plan to guide the process.

“The state government through the Department of Communities has a policy to decentralise large pockets of social housing and redevelop the land to create a range of more diverse and affordable housing options,” Mr Garbett said.

“The Davis Park precinct currently contains around 260 dwellings that are fairly old, low-scale residential. These homes are accessed by a number of cul-de-sac roads, so connectivity with the surrounding neighbourhood is poor.

“For this reason the Department of Communities is keen to redevelop the Davis Park precinct to create a more diverse mix of housing, with both private and public housing and better connections to surrounding areas.

“The structure plan submitted by the Department of Communities shows details such as where roads and public open space will go, as well as types and locations of housing, community facilities and other land uses.

“As the authority responsible for local planning, the City of Fremantle’s role is to assess the plan and make a recommendation to the WA Planning Commission, which will make the final decision on whether the plan is approved or not.

“To help the City prepare its recommendation to the WAPC, we’d really like to hear from the local community and get some feedback on the structure plan.

“Community feedback at this stage is important because, although it doesn’t include details such as the design of new buildings, a structure plan does guide later stages of planning such as subdivision and development applications.”

The Davis Park structure plan proposes the creation of a mixed-use precinct along South Street, with retail, commercial and residential properties.

Public open space around Davis Park will be expanded and an innovation precinct will be established to provide opportunities for alternative housing styles.

Redevelopment of the Davis Park area is a key part of the broader Heart of Beaconsfield planning project, which will guide the redevelopment of surrounding areas like the Lefroy Road Quarry and the former South Metropolitan TAFE site.

An information stall will be set up at the Growers Green Farmers Markets at Fremantle College on Sunday 16 June, with the opportunity to speak with representatives from the Department of Communities and the City’s planning staff on the structure plan proposal.

For more information and to make a submission visit the City of Fremantle’s My Say Freo website. Public comments close on 21 June.

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