Freo's View

HIGH STREET UPGRADE IMPACT ON TREES

Posted in city of fremantle, environment, freight, fremantle ports, traffic, trees, Uncategorized by freoview on June 21, 2019

 

trees-on-high-street

MAINROADS has supplied the above graph to show how many trees will be saved and which ones will be lost for the Fremantle High Street Upgrade, which is anticipated to make the freight journey to Fremantle Port faster and easier.

Work is due to start in just a few months from now and will take some of the public golf course.

Roel Loopers

MOST TREES RETAINED AT HIGH STREET UPGRADE

 

MAINROADS has issued a statement concerning the preservation of trees at the Fremantle High Street Upgrade project, which I post in part below.

There is still no word if the City of Fremantle will receive land at Clontarf Hill in exchange for the loss of CoF land for the High Street Upgrade.

Since Commonwealth and State funding was received in May 2017, we have been working in partnership with the City of Fremantle to develop a concept plan that meets the key objective of improving safety on High Street, while minimising impacts to the surrounding environment – particularly established trees. These measures include:

Overall clearing footprint: There are 245 large trees in the project area between Carrington Street and Stirling

Highway. While earlier versions of this project would have required significant clearing, our final concept design retains at least 178 (or 72%) of these trees. 67 (28%) will be cleared.

Nesting hollows: No current or potential nesting hollows for black cockatoos or other species are impacted by the project.

Future potential breeding trees: 64 (of 245) trees within the project area are considered to be future potential breeding trees (there is no current evidence of breeding).

The project will retain at least 48 (75%) of these trees. 16 (25%) will be cleared.

Tuart trees: 31 trees within the project area are tuarts. We’ve changed our design to save at least 13 of these tuarts. This includes specimens close to the Fremantle Netball Centre estimated to be between 40 and 50 years old.

Design changes: The project will provide a tree-lined median between the eastbound and westbound carriageways. While providing an attractive gateway into the city, this measure allows 28 trees to be preserved.

Landscaping and Urban Design: We have developed a Landscape and Urban Design Framework and specified a high standard of urban design for the project through consultation with local stakeholders including the City of Fremantle and the local community. The detailed development of the urban design will involve a coordinated team of urban designers, landscape architects, a public artist and public arts coordinator, and will include further consultation with local stakeholders. The detailed landscaping plan comprises soft landscaping, involving extensive planting and revegetation with species appropriate to the local area. The planting work will be done by a specialist contractor in the first winter following construction completion.

Roel Loopers

WATER PIPES FOR FREMANTLE COMMUNITY CONSULTATION

Posted in city of fremantle, shopping, traders, Uncategorized by freoview on June 8, 2019

 

I received this information below late yesterday from the Water Corporation regarding the planned work on water pipes in the Fremantle CBD, so it is important to share it with the community. Please pass it on!

Today we met with representatives from the City of Fremantle, Fremantle Chamber of Commerce, West End Traders and Freo Now to discuss the proposed work. Key concerns raised included the proposed streets for renewal in 2019, in particular High Street, the timing of this work and potential negative impacts to the businesses.

Following this meeting, we’re looking for expressions of interest from individuals to form a working group. The purpose of the working group is to hear comments, questions and concerns from representatives across the whole project area. Your feedback will play an important role in our decision making process for the project.

Please email pipesforperth@watercorporation.com.au with your contact details, if you’re businesses owner, building owner, or resident and why you’re interested in being a part of the group.

We hope to form this working group as soon as possible and meet within the next week to discuss next steps.

Customer survey

Please check your email inboxes for a customer survey which was sent this morning, asking customers to vote for your preferred working hours and days for the work. We encourage everyone to participate and provide your feedback. This information and your feedback will be used in determining suitable working days and hours for the project.

The survey will remain open until midnight Friday 14 June. The results will be shared with everyone Monday 17 June.

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HIGH STREET UPGRADE TO FINALLY START IN SEPTEMBER

 

The Fremantle High Street Upgrade which was to start in March this year is delayed again and will now commence in September with the demolition of the residential properties which are occupied by squatters.

MAINROADS released the message below this morning:

High Street Upgrade a step closer following Environmental Approval

The upgrade of High Street will proceed following completion of the Environmental Protection Authority’s (EPA) Public Environmental Review process.

In March 2019, the EPA found the proposal environmentally acceptable, provided the conditions to reduce noise levels, retain identified mature trees and minimise the impact on black cockatoos were met. A public appeals process followed and the project can now proceed subject to the above conditions, following approval from the Minister for Environment on 23 May 2019. Further information can be found on the EPA website.

The project’s concept design , developed in consultation with the City of Fremantle, reflects a commitment to retain as many mature native and non-native trees as possible through the introduction of a median strip, as well as the installation of noise walls to offer residents protection from traffic noise. Engagement with local residents regarding the final location, design and configuration of these noise walls is ongoing.

Procurement update

In March 2019, Main Roads asked three shortlisted proponents to provide costed proposals for the detailed design and construction of the project. We expect to receive these proposals in July with a view to awarding a contract for delivery of the project in October. Construction is scheduled to begin by the end of this year.

Demolition of Main Roads properties on High Street

Main Roads owns several properties in the High Street Upgrade road reserve that will be demolished as the land is required for the project. The majority are not leased and are in poor and potentially dangerous condition.

We are aware these properties are being illegally used by people for accommodation. Consequently, we have been working with the Department of Communities to ensure the people residing in the properties have access to alternative housing.

Demolition of these properties is scheduled to occur in September following a 90-day notice period. Every effort will be made to minimise disruption to local residents and the road network during the demolition process.

Roel Loopers

ANGST ABOUT NEW WATER PIPES FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, hospitality, retail, traders, traffic, Uncategorized, water by freoview on May 30, 2019

 

There is quite a bit of apprehension about the Pipes for Fremantle works which are scheduled by the Water Corporation to start in June in the Fremantle CBD.

Traders and Council staff are concerned about the inevitable impact the road works will have with road closures, accessibility problems and loss of parking bays, so what can be done to make it as good as possible?

Of course the first that was considered was free parking, but it is doubtful it would have a tangible impact and would be more of a goodwill gesture than anything else.

How can Watercorp make it any better because there is day-time and night-time trading in the inner city, so moving the essential renewal of the pipes to the evenings is not a solution. Day and night work would make the project faster and roads would be closed for a shorter time, but is that practical?

To put it bluntly, without wanting to create panic, there are no easy solutions. The work has to be done or we might end up with water mains bursting and flooding and other damage, so our struggling traders will have to cop it again. I hope for them that financial compensation is an option because there is little doubt that the water pipes work will impact on their businesses.

Streets for renewal include:

  • Bannister Street, between Pakenham Street to Market Street.
  • Collie Street, between Marine Terrace and South Terrace.
  • Essex Lane, between Collie Street and Essex Street.
  • Essex Street, between Marine Terrace and South Terrace.
  • High Street, between Little High Street and Market Street.
  • Leake Street, between Pakenham Street and Market Street.
  • Marine Terrace, between Cliff Street and Suffolk Street, and Howard Street and Price Street.
  • Market Street, between High Street and Bannister Street
  • Nairn Street, between Pakenham Street and Market Street.
  • Norfolk Street, between Marine Terrace and South Terrace
  • Pakenham Street, between Collie Street and Leake Street
  • South Terrace, between Bannister Street and Norfolk Street

We estimate this construction work will take now place between June and November 2019.

Streets no longer included in this package of work include:

  • Henry Street, between Marine Terrace and Phillimore Street.
  • Pakenham Street, Leake Street to Phillimore Street.
  • Phillimore Street, between Henry Street and Pakenham Street.
  • Short Street, between Pakenham Street and Market Street

Renewal of the water mains on these streets will be completed at a later date.

Roel Loopers

 

MOON CHOW FIRST CHINESE MIGRANT TO FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, heritage, history, immigration, Uncategorized by freoview on May 18, 2019

 

Moon Chow

 

At the end of the Australian Heritage Festival it is nice to tell a little bit about Fremantle’s history not many people are aware of.

It is generally assumed that most early migrants/settlers here were English but quite a few came from different countries. For example Chinese man Moon Chow was one of the first to arrive in Fremantle in 1829.

He became a well-known boat builder and carpenter. He died in 1877.

Because of the accident that caused Moon Chow’s death compulsory night lights and vehicular speed limits were introduced in Fremantle for the first time.

Roel Loopers

 

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COVERED BIKE RACK IN HIGH STREET EAST

Posted in bicycles, city of fremantle, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 11, 2019

 

bicycles

 

The location for a proposed covered bicycle facility at 142 High Street is a bit strange, but I suppose the proximity to Kings Square is the reason for it.

Rumours have it that the City of Fremantle spent $ 500,000 on legal cost in a dispute with the building owner, but the email I sent on Wednesday to the City’s CEO about that remained unanswered, so I can’t tell you more about it.

Roel Loopers

HAMPTON ROAD TRAFFIC ‘IMPROVEMENTS’ COUNCIL COMMENTS

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, schools, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on April 23, 2019

 

Fremantle Councillors have been commenting on Facebook about the article I published yesterday on Freo’s View about the traffic ‘improvements’ at the South Fremantle Hampton Road/Scott Street intersection.

It is rather strange that Councillors don’t want to comment on my blog but do respond to my blog posts on FB rather than at the source.Only a few readers of Freo’s View connect with me on Facebook so they are missing out on the conversation, so I decided to copy and paste the FB comments and publish them here.

It is clear that there must be an understanding at the City of Fremantle that they want to control what is being said in the media and social media, but it makes little sense to me that they engage on Facebook but not on this Fremantle blog.

Hannah Fitzhardinge Roel the residents who live along the southbound side of Hampton Rd were finding it almost impossible to get safely in and out of their driveways when there was a right turn there. Tricky to make everyone happy!

Pip Sawyer Hannah Fitzhardinge well youve made a lot of people mad
I stopped using that shopping centre completely in late March. And thats sad because the IGA had put in a lot of improvements

Hannah Fitzhardinge Pip Sawyer it was a tough call but it didn’t seem right (to the majority of Councillors) to make people’s access to their homes so dangerous. I still use those shops…

Roel Loopers People who live along main roads often have huge difficulties exiting their drive way. The question is if the comfort of a few is more important than the safety of many.

Sam Wainwright Hannah Fitzhardinge and Roel Loopers

The main safety problem with “Option 1” was that retention of right turns from Hampton Rd into Scott St causes drivers who want to continue south to suddenly pull into the bus lane to get around vehicles waiting to turn right.

This certainly poses a hazard for people people pulling in and out of their driveways in the vicinity. However the *main* problem is the danger it creates for people at the adjacent pedestrian crossing. The cars queuing to turn into Scott obscure vision of crossing pedestrians for motorist that try to pass them by lurching into the bus lane. Similarly the pedestrian on seeing a stopped car in the centre lane can’t be expected to anticipate another vehicle travelling at 60 km/h to suddenly appear in the bus lane when they looked and saw no bus coming. This visibility problem is even more of an issue with children.

In their report the officers proposed proposed Option 1 not because they thought it was superior, but because they didn’t think council would have an appetite for blocking right the turn into Scott. They confirmed in discussion that they actually preferred Option 2 (as pictured in your blog post).

The road treatment we went with is not perfect. Inevitably it will deflect some vehicle movements down other streets making them busier, plus it has its own inconvenience. You have to play that balancing act whenever you block a street or put in traffic calming somewhere. Conversely it will make it safer and easier for people on bicycles to cross Hampton at Scott.

I would actually prefer that Scott and Hampton be signalised thus allowing motorists to turn right and giving pedestrians priority when crossing. However there were two issues with this. Main Roads won’t fund a crossing guardian for kids if it’s signalised and they did not want to help pay for traffic lights at this location anyway. From memory the design we opted for will make it easier and cheaper to signalise the intersection sometime in the future.

In that context I remain firmly of the view that Option 2 was the right decision. I put pedestrian safety over the inconvenience of motorists having to travel a bit further down to Lloyd St.

Hannah Fitzhardinge Sam Wainwright well said!

At least now Freo’s View readers can also see what Councillors Fitzhardinge and Wainwright have to say about it. Democracy at work.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE TO GET NEW TRAFFIC BRIDGE

Posted in city of fremantle, freight, fremantle ports, state government, Uncategorized by freoview on April 22, 2019

 

The WA State Government today announced they will be spending $ 230 million on replacing the ailing Fremantle Traffic Bridge. Work is planned to start within three years.

This comes timely after Westport Taskforce chair Nicole Lockwood recently stated that it looks like the best location for a new port will be at Kwinana, once Fremantle Ports reaches capacity, and that is still 15-20 years away according to experts.

There has been a strong reduction in freight on road and an increase of freight on rail since the latter was subsidised by the State Government, but there are still many days where the port is near empty.

Nicole Lockwood said that environmental concerns for a Kwinana Port could be dealt with by modern construction of a wharf on pylons, rather than a full concrete development that would do more damage to Cockburn Sound.

Roel Loopers

 

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SOUTH FREMANTLE ROAD ‘IMPROVEMENTS’ NO ONE WANTED

Posted in accidents, cars, children, city of fremantle, family, local government, schools, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on April 22, 2019

 

road 1

road 2

 

Traffic ‘improvements’ no one wanted have started in South Fremantle at the Hampton Road and Scott Street intersection. Right-hand turns are now permanently disallowed there.

The right-turn ban out of the shopping centre car park at Scott Street remains and that is also nonsensical because it means all cars going north need to exit at Lloyd Street where most of the issues are, but the exit there will somehow be improved as part of this expensive and useless exercise by the City of Fremantle.

Improving the crosswalk for students and parents of the Beaconsfield Primary School and local users was the aim of the extensive community consultation, but a handful of Councillors decided they knew better than the locals, their own staff and Mainroads experts and decided to do it their way.

I use the intersection several times a day on foot and in the car, so I am very familiar with the issues.

What a shame their is no higher authority to go to to get this stupidity overruled.

This and other matters will be discussed tomorrow, Tuesday April 23 at the South Fremantle Precinct meeting at The Local from 6.30pm.

Roel Loopers

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