Freo's View

FERN TO MAKE WAY FOR HIGHWAY UPGRADE

Posted in city of fremantle, freight, fremantle ports, local government, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on November 10, 2018

 

FERN, the Fremantle Environmental Resource Network will be served with a notice that their monthly lease at 26 Montreal Street will be terminated to make way for the upgrade by Main Roads WA of the Stirling Highway/High Street intersection.

FERN has been on the site on a monthly lease since March 2009, so they have been aware for a long time that they will have to move out to accommodate the upgrade of the busy freight link to Fremantle Port.

The community facility will be demolished and the site cleared by the City of Fremantle, but costs for that will be reimbursed by MRWA.

Start for the construction of the intersection upgrade is planned for mid 2019.

Roel Loopers

FINALLY ZEBRA CROSSINGS FOR MARINE TERRACE

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, pedestrians, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on November 10, 2018

 

It is long overdue, and something that I have called for for many years, but we are finally getting pedestrian zebra crossings on Marine Terrace in Fremantle, which is a nightmare to cross, especially on weekends.

Main Roads have approved that the City of Fremantle make the raised plateaus at Essex and Collie streets into proper zebra crossings to make crossing the busy road from the CBD to the Fishing Boat Harbour and vv. much safer.

However a lighting audit has found that the lighting at the crossings is not up to Australian standards and needs to be improved at a total cost of $ 60,000 to the City.

The Finance, Policy and Legislation Committee will on Wednesday decide if Council will want to invest that money to get the safer crossings.

Roel Loopers

HAMPTON ROAD CROSSING STATUS QUO

Posted in children, city of fremantle, local government, pedestrians, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on October 11, 2018

 

I can’t even remember how many Fremantle Council sessions, and community information sessions, and South Fremantle Precinct meetings, I have attended that discussed the dangers of crossing Hampton Road near the Scott Street intersection. I live there so I drive my car in and out of those streets and walk there every day, and shop at IGA and Peaches at the shopping centre between Lloyd  and Scott streets.

So it is fairly disappointing that after all this time and many, many months of talking the FPOL Committee of Fremantle Council decided they did not like the officer’s recommendation of Option One, but preferred the status quo of Option Two.

It means the Scott Street intersection will remain closed and the pedestrian crossing will not be moved 50 metres further south.

They all agreed that the bus lanes were the major problem and that the Main Roads department is basically the enemy of pedestrians, because all that department wants is fast vehicle movement. Now that’s something for the state government to get its teeth into!

The state’s $ 200,000 allocated for better pedestrian crossing, through the election promise by Simone McGurk MLA, could now be spent on re-designing the Lloyd Street/Hampton Road intersection and how to get in and out of the carpark at the shopping centre there, and also at Scott Street.

For me, as a local with extensive local knowledge, the fact is that having no right turn at Scott Street will only entice more motorists to drive too fast and unlawfully use the bus lanes to overtake other vehicles. I have witnessed on many occasions that cars drive in the bus lanes during peak hours all the way from Douro Road to South Street and vice versa.

The FPOL Committee voted 6-1 in favour of Option Two. Only Councillor Andrew Sullivan, who is one of our two South Ward Councillors, voted against it.

For the record. 147 public submissions were received. 65% of those preferred option 1 and only 15% of them the option 2 Councillors voted for last night. And 20% did not like either option.

Roel Loopers

BEACY PRIMARY KIDS GET SAFER CROSSING

Posted in children, city of fremantle, local government, pedestrians, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on October 8, 2018

 

It has been a long road with many community consultations, but it looks as if the City of Fremantle will finally make a decision this Wednesday of moving the pedestrian crossing on Hampton Road near the Scott Street intersection 50 metres south to make it safer, especially for kids who attend the Beaconsfield Primary School.

An important decision will also be the re-opening of the Scott Street intersection, so that motorists coming from the south can turn right into Scott St and don’t have to do the dog leg via Jennings and Maxwell streets.

The State Government is paying for it through a $ 200,000 grant under the Local Projects, Local Jobs Program.

The item is before the Finance, Policy and Legislation Committee on Wednesday.

OFFICER’S RECOMMENDATION

Council approve Project 11664 to improve safety for pedestrians crossing Hampton Road near the Scott Street intersection, in accordance with Option 1 of the community consultation, as shown on concept plan – drawing number 005-CP-17-001-D, in Attachment 1 of this report, to:

1. Move the guarded school pedestrian crossing approximately 50 meters south of its current location and create a new guarded school pedestrian crossing, complete with median island refuge and also pedestrian crossing lights that will flash at peak, before and after school crossing times.

2. Remove the existing guarded school pedestrian crossing.

3. Move the existing northbound bus stop approximately 20m north of its existing location, to provide a safe distance from the guarded school pedestrian crossing.

4. Reinstate access for vehicles turning right into Scott Street through the removal of the trial median installed in March 2017.

5. Trial the use of a riley kerb system to deter vehicular lane changes on the approach to the guarded school pedestrian crossing as shown in Attachment 1.

Roel Loopers

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WRAY AVE PARKLET TO BE RELOCATED

Posted in city of fremantle, community, parking, parklet, Uncategorized by freoview on September 30, 2018

 

The beautiful Wray Avenue parklet has been removed and will be given some TLC and relocated to another street in Fremantle.

The parklet, designed by Jean-Paul Horre, was designed to be a solar power one but issues with Western Power prevented it from being connected to the grid, hence the City of Fremantle is now trying to relocate the parklet to a location where solar power can become part of it. Stay tuned!

Roel Loopers.

 

MAKING FREMANTLE MORE WALKABLE

 

What makes a walkable city, and is Fremantle one of them, was asked at the Politics in the Pubs forum by the Fremantle Network at The Local in South Fremantle on Tuesday evening.

A panel with Olwyn Williams, the CEO of the Fremantle Chamber of Commerce, Dr Annie Matan of CUSP(Curtin University of Sustainable Policy), and City of Fremantle urban and transport planner Martin Spencer addressed the topic before a general discussion

Martin Spencer said that on the walkability index Fremantle gets 72-79 out of 100 and is the 19th most walkable suburb in the Perth metro area.

We need to make the city open, invite people in, and make them walk. Drag people into the shops and off the footpaths, and connect destinations with better signage.

Dr Annie Matan said that being pro pedestrians and cyclists did not mean we are anti car, but we need great public transport and walking and cycle infrastructure to make the city work better. There needs to be a safe and interesting environment for pedestrians, which includes good public toilets, water fountains, benches, shade structures and trees, etc.

“Every road needs to tell a story to our visitors and ourselves”

Footpaths are where we meet friends, and importantly also strangers. It is where we connect with our communities.

We need to create authentic places as they are important, and destinations to walk to, and do connections better, such as walking from the CBD to South Beach or the Fremantle Arts Centre.

Many footpaths are cluttered and become a hazard and Fremantle City needs a strong policy for planning walkability, Dr Matan said.

Olwyn Williams said that Fremantle has got more than anyone else; the port, heritage, the university, beaches, cafes, art, shopping, festivals and concerts, but we are a small community with a small ratepayers’ base, so we need the outside world to come to Freo and make it economically viable to set up shop here.

We need more visitors, more people working here and more residents, and to become a better place we need to embrace medium density living.

Connections with the suburbs is vital and important as Fremantle is not just the CBD.

Road closures in the CBD often have a negative impact on nearby businesses and the City should consider that more carefully. The second hour free parking the City of Fremantle has just implemented, is a very good idea as it will make people linger longer, Williams said.

Wayfinding needs to improve as signs don’t tell you that you could walk just a block further to enjoy Wray Avenue, or that it is a nice half hour walk to South Beach, and we need much better lighting to make us feel safer at night.

Olwyn Williams also said that the High Street Mall is a disaster and the closure should never have happened.

Martin Spencer said it was about time the community took ownership as it can’t be just left to local governments to implement change.

Comment: I believe we need to make the walking journey more attractive and make it a discovery, an adventure, walks where we connect all our Freo hidden treasures, and where we decentralise more and better utilise the A Class reserve at Arthur’s Head, the lawn next to the Roundhouse, Pioneer, Princess May and Fremantle parks, etc.

Fremantle offers a unique experience and that is what our new destination marketing should be all about. People will be encouraged to walk if we offer them a better shopping and lifestyle experience.

Roel Loopers

 

 

FREO POLITICS IN THE PUB TONIGHT

Posted in city of fremantle, fremantle network, pedestrians, politics, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on September 25, 2018

 

A reminder that the Politics in the Pub by the Fremantle Network is on tonight at The Local in South Fremantle from 6.30pm.

Topic of the evening is the question if Fremantle is pedestrian friendly, so it will be interesting to hear suggestions on how we can improve the pedestrian experience and make it safer.

Far too many motorists don’t give way to pedestrians when rounding corners, and only a  few of them stop during busy weekends on the Cappuccino Strip and Marine Terrace to let pedestrians cross. That lack of consideration, and how/if we can improve it needs to be discussed as well.

See you at The Local. It’s a free event, but meals and drinks available at the bar.

Roel Loopers

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IS FREMANTLE REALLY WALKING FRIENDLY?

Posted in city of fremantle, community, fremantle network, pedestrians, Uncategorized by freoview on September 18, 2018

 

The next POLITICS IN THE PUB by the Fremantle Network is on next Tuesday September 25 from 6.30-8.30pm at the Local hotel in South Fremantle.

The topic is Is Fremantle really walking friendly? and will be discussed by a panel of Urban and Transport Planner Martin Spencer, Dr Annie Matan of CUSP(Curtin University of Sustainable Policy) and Olwyn Williams, the CEO of the Fremantle Chamber of Commerce.

Of course there is also community participation during the Q&A.

Catch up with your community, have a meal and drink, and positively contribute to Freo’s future!

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE CYCLIST SURVEY

Posted in bicycles, city of fremantle, cycling, local government, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on September 11, 2018

 

The City of Fremantle is asking cyclists about their experiences riding around Freo as part of a review of the City’s bike plan.

The City of Fremantle Local Bicycle Plan was adopted in 2014 with the goal of doubling the number of bike trips in Fremantle by 2018 by providing better cycling infrastructure, reducing the barriers to cycling and encouraging more people to ride a bike.

Since 2013 the City of Fremantle has installed 2.3km of on-road bike lanes and 1km of new bike paths, upgraded six key intersections with bike head-start facilities and rolled out Bicycle Awareness Zones over 6km of local and city centre roads.

The City has also upgraded more than 2km of path along popular coastal routes, installed more than 160 bike parking bays and added green bike lane treatments at intersections along four major roads.

Cyclists can provide their feedback on Fremantle bike network by completing a survey on the City’s My Say Freo website.

They can also map their regular routes and good bike spaces, highlight problem areas and share ideas on an interactive map.

The survey is open until 9 October, with a new bike plan expected to be presented to the council for endorsement early next year.

For more information visit the Bike Plan Review on My Say Freo.

HIGH STREET UPGRADE CONCEPT VISUAL

Posted in city of fremantle, freight, fremantle ports, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on August 30, 2018

 

High Street upgrade

Here the latest visual by WA Main Roads of the High Street-Stirling Highway upgrade in Fremantle.

Fremantle Council last night endorsed Main Roads WA’s revised plan for the upgrade of High Street.

The state government last year committed $118 million to upgrade High Street, from Carrington Street to Stirling Highway, to reduce traffic congestion and improve road safety.

A concept plan released by Main Roads in March included a roundabout at the intersection of High Street and Stirling Highway, a wide median to separate traffic and preserve significant trees, and a new service road for residents on the northern side of High Street.

Following extensive community consultation, underpasses under High Street and Stirling Highway were added to the revised plan to improve connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists.

At a special meeting on Wednesday the council endorsed the revised plan and also consented to the excision of land from A Class and C Class reserves along High Street to accommodate the project.

To offset the loss of land from the High Street reserves the council is seeking to exchange it for Main Roads land on Clontarf Hill.

 

Roel Loopers

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