Freo's View

FREO FLU VACCINES DRIVE-THROUGH

Posted in city of fremantle, health, Uncategorized by freoview on April 11, 2020

 

92006033_10158362414707376_7441775982786117632_n

Still on this Easter Sunday!

 

Comments Off on FREO FLU VACCINES DRIVE-THROUGH

FREO DRIVE THROUGH FREE FLU INJECTIONS

Posted in city of fremantle, health, Uncategorized by freoview on April 7, 2020

 

92006033_10158362414707376_7441775982786117632_n

 

It is going to be a pretty boring long Easter weekend with the Fremantle Street Arts Festival cancelled because of  Covid-19, but something good is happening on the street anyway!

The friendly team at West End Medical will be offering drive-thru flu vaccines for over 65s, at risk over 40s and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people this weekend.

It is on Saturday and Sunday between 9am and 3pm at the Captain Munchies carpark in Beach Street.

Visit https://bit.ly/3aMuWgr for more details.

Great idea!

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on FREO DRIVE THROUGH FREE FLU INJECTIONS

SUPPORT FOR FREO’S ELDERLY NEIGHBOURS

Posted in city of fremantle, community, health, local government, seniors, Uncategorized by freoview on March 18, 2020

 

The City of Fremantle is launching the Neighbour to Neighbour project aims to support communities at high risk of being impacted by the threats of COVID-19, including seniors, people with a disability, people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds and Indigenous people.

Neighbour to Neighbour encourages local residents to sign up and volunteer to help vulnerable people in their community with simple errands, including grocery shopping, dog walking, posting mail or simply checking in with a friendly phone call.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt said the Neighbour to Neighbour project was ultimately about connecting community and helping each other in a time of crisis.

“We understand that there are many people living independently who may not have family or friends nearby to help them during this challenging time,” Mayor Pettitt said.

Residents can fill out a short survey on the City’s website to register as a volunteer, and will then be put in direct contact with people in their neighbourhood requesting assistance.

In the coming days, City staff will also be contacting ratepayers aged over 70 via mail or telephone to touch base and offer assistance.

For more information about the Neighbour to Neighbour project and to sign up as a volunteer, visit the City’s website. The volunteer sign-up forms are also available in printed format and will be available across the community.

Roel Loopers

WE DON’T BUILD COMMUNITIES. WE BUILD PLACES OF ISOLATION

 

There was an interesting panel discussion NO FIXED ADDRESS, to discuss the importance of social housing and building diversity in our urban centres, in the lovely courtyard of DADAA in Fremantle’s Princes May Park, last night with Dr. Mariana Atkins, Research Associate Professor, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia and the UWA Living Lab, Dr Holly Farley, Research Fellow, Fremantle School of Architecture, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Dr. Shane Greive, Urban and Regional Planning, School of Design and Built Environment, Curtin University, Michael Piu (CEO, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre), and  Heather Thompson (Senior Assertive Outreach Worker, 20 Lives 20 Homes Program, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre).  It was facilitated by Lisette Kaleveld, Senior Consultant, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia.

Changing cityscapes are inevitable with urban infill making places such as Fremantle desirable, especially since most of the services are provided in town, and that attracts a diversity of people, including homeless ones, and those who require social and affordable housing, but we are not designing and building for that diversity and the needs of individuals. Not many local governments have the capacity and desire to change with the times, so how do you design a city for all?

People want to be connected, be in contact with nature and there is a real disconnect there, so we need to bring the community on board because it is about the collective, not individuals. To do that we need to start understanding the history of Australia and the values, and where we want to go. We need to understand the diverse perspective, and need to learn to understand the different realities. Design should not be about excluding people!

Homelessness is nothing new and has been around for decades, so the whole community needs to own the issues and solutions, but there is a lack of value judgement. It is a fallacy that homeless people are in control of their own future! We all are only a few steps away from homelessness and if we come together the solutions are in our own hands. Start a conversation and humanise the issue!

A social worker said she had met some of the most amazing, caring and resilient people one would like to meet.

Architects and developers need to start actively listen to everybody’s stories from a design perspective. Bring the focus of development back to the people! We need a change of mindset there, as the next generation of home buyers can’t afford to buy the homes of the present generation. Inter-generational housing is not available, the housing options are not there.

There is huge value in diversity in a community, and we don’t want people with similar social/financial issues all living together, there needs to be a mix and we need to understand what home means for different people. Public housing often results in people failing because of the wrong set up and location and the lack of support. For some community housing or a boarding house is better because they don’t have to look after paying bills and connect with others. Community housing is more flexible.

There is also an interesting small exhibition in the DADAA gallery, so go and have a look at it!

COMMENT:

We don’t build communities, we build spaces where people are alone, spaces of loneliness, because at the lower end of the apartment market there are no community spaces where people can connect. There are no swimming pools, gyms, roof gardens, etc. We build highrise along transit corridors, instead of building them around green open spaces where people can meet and play.

There are tens of thousands of single middle aged and older women and men who have no social life because they can no longer afford to go to pubs, concerts, festivals, theatres, etc. where they used to connect with friends and meet new people. They don’t meet anyone and get isolated. High density living does not cater for that by providing community spaces. Many single people live in a small box with no communical spaces where they can meet their neighbours and make new friends that way.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE CYCLING WITHOUT AGE

Posted in aged, bicycles, city of fremantle, seniors, Uncategorized by freoview on December 4, 2019

 

Cycling Without Age, an international not-for-profit organisation that allows elderly and less mobile people to experience an outdoor ride on trishaw e-bikes piloted by volunteer cyclists, has launched in Fremantle.

The social enterprise was partially funded by the City of Fremantle’s Arts and Community Grants program and received $5000 earlier this year to help get it off the ground.

City of Fremantle Director of Community Development Michelle Brennand said Cycling Without Age encouraged ageing in a positive context and built bridges between generations.

Cycling Without Age was established in Denmark in 2012, and is represented in 42 countries around the world today.

Cycling Without Age are piloted trishaw rides that follow two routes and are  entirely free for passengers.

They depart Monday to Friday from South Beach and cycle to South Fremantle Power Station and back, and on weekends they are at Bathers Beach cycling to B Shed and the South Mole.

Volunteer pilot cyclist act as a channel for passengers telling stories and many of the older passengers talk about their memories of the area.

Cycling Without Age’s Fremantle chapter is currently recruiting volunteer cyclists, who will be trained to pilot the trishaw.

They are also raising funds for a second trishaw. While the first trishaw was funded by a bequest and a City of Fremantle community grant, CWA are now seeking smaller donations and sponsorships from local businesses and care providers to expand this  community service.

For more information, visit cyclingwithoutage.org.au. To book a ride, call 0448 447 223 or email adminwa@cyclingwithoutage.org.au.

Cycling Without Age is also offering trial rides at the City’s International Day of People with Disability and International Volunteer Day event at The Meeting Place on 5 December. Book here to register your attendance.

 

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on FREMANTLE CYCLING WITHOUT AGE

NOMINATIONS OPEN FOR SENIORS AWARDS

Posted in city of fremantle, community, seniors, state government, Uncategorized by freoview on September 9, 2019

 

Seniors and Ageing Minister Mick Murray has led the call for nominations ahead of the 2019 WA Seniors Awards.

The annual awards recognise and celebrate the State’s most remarkable seniors, while acknowledging organisations working to improve the lives of older Western Australians.

The awards will recognise both the metropolitan and regional WA Senior of the Year, as well as the WA Age Friendly Local Government of the Year and the WA Age Friendly Business of the Year.

Entries can be lodged by members of the general public or by organisations, with nominations closing at 5pm on October 4, 2019.

The 2019 WA Seniors Awards are presented by the Council on the Ageing (WA) in partnership with the McGowan Government and are promoted as part of WA Seniors Week celebrations, which run from November 10-17.

For more information and to nominate an outstanding senior, visit https://www.cotawa.org.au

 

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on NOMINATIONS OPEN FOR SENIORS AWARDS

DRAFT POLICY OF FREMANTLE’S AGE FRIENDLY CITY

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, community, local government, seniors, social services, Uncategorized by freoview on March 22, 2019

 

Below is the first draft of the Age Friendly City policy that will be fine-tuned by City staff and Elected Members in the next months. There are many departments and agencies involved so it needs to go through a thorough and inclusive process to make sure that all the details are right and nothing is overlooked:

INTRODUCTION

The City of Fremantle’s Strategic Community Plan 2015- 2025 aims for Fremantle to be an environment where it is easy for people to live safe, happy and healthy lives. It seeks to celebrate and support diversity and improve community inclusiveness and participation for all.

According to 2016 Census data the City of Fremantle has both a higher median age and a larger proportion of people over 55, compared to Western Australia. As a destination city it also attracts visitors of all ages.

The City’s journey to becoming an age friendly city started in 2010 and in 2016 the City was accepted as a member to the World Health Organisation Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities. The WHO age-friendly cities guide highlights eight interconnected domains that cities and communities can address to better adapt to the needs of older people:

  • The built environment
  • Transport
  • Housing
  • Social participation
  • Respect and social inclusion
  • Civic participation and employment
  • Communication
  • Community support and health services.

To prepare a new Age Friendly City Plan a review of the City’s progress commenced in 2018. A Working Group with representatives from community members, key organisations, City staff and Elected Members met throughout the review to guide the process. Over 150 people were engaged either online, through surveys, at events or via one-on-one meetings and their input informed the development of new and revised actions for the City.

Purpose of the Plan

The purpose of the Age Friendly City Plan is to prioritise positive ageing opportunities for the Fremantle community and a great place for older people to visit.

The plan is organised in line with the eight WHO age friendly city domains and covers actions the City can lead, facilitate or promote as well as advocate for where the responsibility sits outside local government. The Plan represents a whole-of-organisation approach and will be supported with an implementation plan. To maintain its status as a WHO global age friendly city the plan will need to be evaluated in three years.

  1. Social participation

Provide a range of lifelong learning activities that encourage older people to participate in community life.

1.1 Provide activities and courses at various locations that encourage participation and increase social participation.

1.2 Provide affordable programs that encourage older people to try new and different sports or other forms of physical activity.

1.3 Advocate and promote programs and initiatives which target respect, inclusion and social participation.

  1. Community Support and Health Services

Assist people in Fremantle to age positively and actively by providing appropriate information and support to maximise health and wellbeing.

2.1 Improve communication between the City and Fremantle-based aged care providers by offering opportunities for networking meetings.

2.2 Facilitate opportunities which provide information to older people to navigate ageing well and healthy lifestyles.

2.3 Promote My Community Directory which provides details on the range of services and activities for older people in the Fremantle area.

  1. Civic participation and employment

Create opportunities for older people to actively participate in the community through civic involvement.

3.1 Community engagement will be accessible, well-promoted and flexible, engaging older people to have their say.

3.2 Support local organisations to recruit and retain volunteers through Volunteer Fremantle.

3.3 Facilitate opportunities for older people to share their skills and knowledge on a paid or voluntary basis.

  1. Communication and information

Provide accessible information on aged care services in a variety of formats.

4.1 Promote the programs and activities provided by the City of Fremantle for older people in a range of formats.

4.2 Ensure the City of Fremantle website meets accessibility guidelines set out by Vision Australia and the Disability Services Act.

4.3 Community engagement opportunities are well-promoted and offered in a range of formats.

  1. Outdoor spaces and buildings

Ensure that older people have the same opportunities as other people to access the City’s buildings, facilities, parks, reserves, playgrounds and beaches.

5.1 Regular upgrades in the Fremantle local government area where better seating, shading, footpaths and pedestrian crossings are required as part of ongoing capital works.

5.2 Provide accessible community facilities for older persons.

  1. Respect and Inclusion

Provide activities that promote positive images of older people of diverse cultures and increase community participation.

6.1 Celebrate the achievements of older people through a range of events, activities and media.

6.2 Maintain a range of initiatives that encourage inclusive, intergenerational and cross cultural relationships.

6.3 Provide educational opportunities and workshops for older people that enable access to new technologies.

6.4 Provide opportunities for older people to contribute to community led programs and activities.

  1. Transportation

Ensure that older people are able to move around their community easily through public and active transport.

7.1 Advocate to the State Government authorities to improve public transport for older people.

7.2 Continue to contribute to the funding of the Central Area Transit (CAT) Service to allow for easy mobility around the Fremantle central business district.

7.3 Advocate for a light rail transport system in Fremantle.

7.4 Encourage mobility and social connection by promoting trails for walking, cycling or access by mobility device in the Fremantle local government area.

7.5 Advocate for shelters and seating to be provided at all bus stops.

  1. Housing

Ensure that there is provision of housing which is diverse and affordable to meet the current and future needs of the older people.

8.1 Advocate for statutory changes to the planning system to promote accessible and ageing appropriate housing.

8.2 Establish partnerships with local community housing providers to enable the provision of affordable housing in large development projects and sites.

Comments Off on DRAFT POLICY OF FREMANTLE’S AGE FRIENDLY CITY

I AM RUNNING OUT OF TIME FREO. HURRY UP!

Posted in city of fremantle, community, history, immigration, multicultural, Uncategorized by freoview on March 13, 2019

 

 

The long-hair dude is me in 1982 and the short-hair one is me now, so just a bit of nostalgia and history

Today on March 13, 1982, 37 long years ago, I arrived as a new migrant in Sydney, after having lived as a migrant in Germany for 13 years as well.

My life has been an amazing adventure and I loved every city I lived in; first The Hague in the Netherlands, then Nuremberg in Germany, then Sydney and from September 1985 it was WA. Our first house in Como, the move to Swanbourne, and when I became single after twenty years I moved to Fremantle and discovered this is the place I really love.

I have seen many changes in my 25+ years in Freo, some good, some bad, but I fear I am running out of time to see an Aboriginal Cultural Centre purpose-built here, and new interpretive displays at the Roundhouse.

I am 70-years-old so I am worried that there might not be much time left for me and that I could not be here for the opening of the new Civic Centre, and to see if Fremantle Council’s decision about the Kings Square Redevelopment Project was the right one and created all the inner city activation so desperately needed.

Will urban infill kill Freo, as some critics claim, or will it help to create vitality and rejuvenation of a tired city? Will I ever find out?

Whatever the outcome and different opinions about it, I love good old Freo. It is a very special place that has so much to offer to so many people. It has given me a home where I have a very strong sense of belonging to a caring community with many great people. I feel blessed. Thank you all!

Roel Loopers

 

 

PAYSTAY IN FREO BUT NOT WHEN YOU ARE OLD

Posted in cars, city of fremantle, local government, parking, Uncategorized by freoview on March 7, 2019

 

Pay Stay

 

It appears the new City of Fremantle PayStay parking App. has a flaw. A South Fremantle resident reported on the precinct Facebook page that she tried to sign up and had to enter her date of birth, but the App only went as far as 1950, so people born before that are in a bit of a worry.

I am sure it is just a small glitch that can be rectified fast, unless the parking contractor believed only young people live in good old Freo. 😩

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on PAYSTAY IN FREO BUT NOT WHEN YOU ARE OLD

FREMANTLE AGE FRIENDLY CITY PLANS

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, community, local government, seniors, Uncategorized by freoview on February 26, 2019

 

The City of Fremantle are aiming to make Fremantle the most positive place it can be for our seniors.

The City of Fremantle is a registered Age Friendly City through the World Health Organisation and are currently preparing their new age friendly city plan to guide the direction of the City over the next five years.

To prepare the new plan a review of the City’s progress commenced in 2018. A Working Group, of which I was a member, with representatives from community members, key organisations, City staff and Elected Members have met throughout the review to guide the process.

Over 150 people were engaged either online, through surveys, at events or via one-on-one meetings and their input has started the process of developing  new and revised actions for the City in regard to our senior citizens.

You are encouraged to read the draft Age Friendly City Plan 2019- 2024 and share your feedback in the survey below by Tuesday 19 March 2019. Copies will also be available in the Wanjoo Lounge at Fremantle Library.

https://mysay.fremantle.wa.gov.au/agefriendly2019

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on FREMANTLE AGE FRIENDLY CITY PLANS

%d bloggers like this: