Freo's View

VISIT FREMANTLE’S SUBMARINE

Posted in city of fremantle, maritime, tourism, Uncategorized by freoview on August 7, 2019

 

submarine

 

Not much news in Fremantle so I went for a leisurely walk on this beautiful morning and noticed the group of visitors on the submarine at the Maritime Museum.

If you have not visited the Owen sub or Maritime Museum put it on your bucket list. Free entry on Tuesdays.

Did you know that Fremantle was the biggest submarine port in the southern hemisphere during WWII?

Roel Loopers

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CONNECTING FREO’S FUTURE TO THE PAST

 

I enjoy talking with architects, city planners and developers about Fremantle’s future and have found it educational and inspiring to have discussions with City of Fremantle heritage coordinator architect Alan Kelsall about how we should try to grow Fremantle.

Alan and I agree that in general the Fremantle community recognises that the need for regeneration of the city is necessary and that it is desirable if done well: if it is managed, planned and implemented in ways that reinforce and sustain the sense of Fremantle’s distinctiveness embodied in it, such as the rich mix of built heritage and unique urban character.

However, without broad, long-term public support and commitment to the planning vision for Fremantle it is unlikely to be successful. As a community we therefore need to have a clear understanding of what we mean when we try to articulate it. The ultimate outcome will set the standard for good design within Freo’s heritage areas and getting it right is essential to securing the future of our heritage buildings.

Let’s consider Fremantle’s history and what it means in the context of future growth of our city. Fremantle was developed as a port town and a centre of trade, and for most of its history it was prosperous and acknowledged as the second city in the metro area. That underscores the city’s distinct character and its rich heritage.

The prosperity of Fremantle encouraged the construction of its present heritage buildings. These developments were not simply utilitarian or profit based, but showed a desire to display a mix of business confidence and civic pride. That is probably why these buildings have a quality that people continue to find attractive, and why most people in our community believe it is worth conserving them, not only as memorial of the past but also as exemplars of successful, high quality architecture, urban design and city planning.

Fremantle had buildings with a strong association with the working port, but also buildings that provided a diverse mix of uses. These included schools, shops, places to work and socialise, etc. which people living in its densely populated catchment could reach on foot or by public transport. It is what we now consider to be an example of sustainable urban design.

Fremantle Port played a primary role in Freo’s success and its distinct character due to the facts that processing, storage and distribution of export and import commodities took place in buildings located near the harbour. It created the mutual interdependence between the port and the city that generated and sustained our port city character.

However this pattern of beneficial evolution changed in 1969 with the introduction of containerisation, which caused profound changes in Fremantle, not only because it changed the way in which ships were loaded and unloaded but also because storage and distribution of export and import commodities no longer took place near the harbour. These changes completely severed the earlier mutual supporting interdependencies between the harbour, city centre and surrounding residential suburbs. The changes impacted not only on shipping and its associated industries but also affected the commercial, retail, social and residential vitality of the city. In addition it caused deterioration of the quality of public areas and less appreciation of the worth of its heritage buildings.

It is obviously impossible, and probably not even desirable, to try to replicate the primary role played by the port in the past, but it is possible, through new higher density mixed-use development located between Victoria Quay and Kings Square, within reach of the railway station, to reproduce the type of mutually supporting interdependencies that used to exist between the port and the city centre. For this to be successful though it demands that development is guided by integrated strategic planning that is inspired, but not limited, by the past to create the conditions of genuine everyday activities, that should come as a result of more people living and working and enjoying social leisure time in all its diversity within the same area.

It is important to recognise that the role residential development on appropriate sites in the CBD can play is crucial to generating the vitality and resilience needed to cope with future problems and to adjust to changing circumstances. A fundamental benefit of regenerating and revitalising the area in this way is that it would promote positive change and would contribute to re-establishing Fremantle’s city centre as the heart of the community, which has already started with the Kings Square redevelopment project.

If Fremantle’s heritage is not managed carefully because it is considered to be too hard it will be at risk of being lost and with this its potential to enrich the city in ways that give a sense of distinctiveness, meaning and quality to the places in which people live and work, as well as the sense of destination that attracts people to Freo and makes them want to come and spend time in our city and thus contribute to secure its future.

It is a huge challenge to get it right, but with respectful dialogue between developers, city planners and the community we can all positively contribute to Fremantle’s progress and future.

Roel Loopers

A huge thank you to Alan Kelsall for his collaboration with constructing this article!

 

 

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SHIPWRECKS NOT FORGOTTEN BY FOGOTTEN

Posted in art, city of fremantle, culture, fremantle festival, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on July 16, 2019

 

DSC_4899

 

FOGOTTEN by Genrefonix was on for the last few nights as part of the Fremantle Festival so I went to the Shipwrecks Museum on Tuesday evening to take some photos.

Kids love the fog and come to play in it without realising this is about the great sea storm of 1899 when the Carlisle Castle and the City of York ships sank in the devastating storm.

Check out the Fogotten Facebook page for more performances which include projections and music.

Roel Loopers

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SULLIVAN HALL MEMORABILIA AND STORIES WANTED

Posted in city of fremantle, community, history, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on July 15, 2019

 

Sullivan Hall

 

Cute Sullivan Hall in White Gum Valley is 60 years old and organisers plan to celebrate its birthday on August 11 and 12 with cake stalls, singing, dancing the release of racing pigeons, and more.

To commemorate the history of the community hall organisers are keen to get hold of memorabilia, photos, stories, etc. to put on display.

Early residents of White Gum Valley were interviewed recently so that their stories can be included in the Fremantle Library history collection.

If you have anything to contribute please contact Brian Smith on 0419 191432 asap.

Roel Loopers

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HISTORIC FOG SHOW IN HENRY STREET

 

Fog

 

This could be an interesting fog art installation at the Moores Building in Fremantle’s Henry Street tonight. Go check it out!

Fog rumours for Fri July 12: a film/music/fog installation is happening outside Moore & Moore Cafe on Henry St approx 7pm weather permitting, with potential repeat performances there, or later outside Shipwrecks Museum (Cliff Street), if weather holds. Updates will be posted here and Fogotten | 10 Nights in Port if we move around.

Tonight’s installation is dedicated to the many sailors from The Carlisle Castle and City of York who lost their lives in a horrific storm off Fremantle exactly 120 years ago on July 12th 1899.

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FREMANTLE PRISON SEEKS HERITAGE INTERPRETATION OFFICER

Posted in city of fremantle, employment, fremantle prison, historic, tourism, Uncategorized by freoview on July 2, 2019

 

hero1

 

This sounds like a great job for the right person. Fremantle Prison is looking for a HERITAGE INTERPRETATION OFFICER. It is a PSGOGA 5 level job that pays between $ 87,047-$95,995 p.a.

The director of Fremantle Prison, Paula Nelson, is a can do, visionary, and delightful person with lots of ideas and she will be fantastic to be working with.

Join one of WA’s most innovative and forward-thinking agencies and be part of something rewarding and exciting. The Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage (DPLH) is responsible for planning and managing land and heritage for all West Australians – now and into the future.

The Opportunity

We are seeking an enthusiastic and motivated individual for the Heritage Interpretation Officer role within the Heritage and Property Services Division. In this role, you will be responsible for contributing to the understanding of the cultural, national and international significance of Fremantle Prison. You will review and develop heritage interpretation programs such as tours, signage, training and educational programs to a diverse audience including international visitors, students, special interest groups and the general public.

This position is based at Fremantle Prison and is a permanent and full-time position; however, consideration may be given to applicants seeking part-time opportunities. Suitable applicants may be considered for appointment to similar (permanent, fixed term, full-time or part-time) vacancies for a period of twelve (12) months from the initial date of the appointment.

To be successful in this role, you will need to demonstrate;

  • Your ability to evaluate, develop and deliver high quality content and material for entertaining and educational visitor experiences, training and programs for a diverse audience including international visitors, students, special interest groups and the general public
  • Strong interpersonal and collaborative skills with the ability to develop and maintain networks with internal and external stakeholders
  • Extensive experience in the cultural heritage sector and an understanding of heritage interpretation and conservation

If you would like to know more, please give Paula Nelson, Director, Fremantle Prison a call on (08) 9336 9213 to discuss the role in further detail.

 

Roel Loopers

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MORE PROTECTION IN NEW HERITAGE ACT

 

It is important for Fremantle that stronger protections for Western Australia’s heritage places will come into effect on July 1, 2019, with the gazettal of the new Heritage Act 2018 and Heritage Regulations 2019 taking place today (June 27).

The new legislation replaces the outdated Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990, aligning WA with other States by ensuring better protections for important heritage places, particularly those left to ‘demolition by neglect’.

Key changes include:

  • A streamlined process for entering a place in the State Register of Heritage Places;
  • Clarity for owners wishing to develop their heritage places;
  • Better protection for heritage places at risk from ‘demolition by neglect’;
  • Increased transparency by publishing the Heritage Council’s advice to the Minister for Heritage on the inclusion of a place in the State Register; and
  • Time limits on certain decisions to provide certainty for decision-makers, industry and the community. 

The Heritage Council provides technical and professional assistance, and promotes public awareness and knowledge in relation to the State’s cultural heritage.

For a copy of the new Act and regulations, visit http://www.dplh.wa.gov.au

 

Roel Loopers

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RECONCILIATION AWARD FOR ONE DAY IN FREMANTLE

 

One Day

 

Great moorditj news and well deserved!

The City of Fremantle’s alternative Australia Day One Day in Fremantle event has  received an Australian Government award for promoting Indigenous reconciliation.

One Day in Fremantle took out the Promoting Indigenous Reconciliation category at the 2019 National Awards for Local Government in Canberra today.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt and the City’s Aboriginal Engagement Officer Brendan Moore were presented with the award by the federal Minister for Local Government Mark Coulton.

Mayor Pettitt said he was thrilled the City’s efforts to establish the One Day event had received national recognition.

“Our intention with One Day was to create an inclusive, family-friendly event where all members of the community felt comfortable to celebrate what’s great about being Australian,” Mayor Pettitt said.

“I said after the first One Day concert that it was the best event I had ever been involved with. The spirit among the crowd and the sense of belonging and community was a beautiful experience.

“It was never about being anti-Australian or divisive. It was about encouraging people to come out and enjoy Australia’s diversity, bringing people together and promoting reconciliation – which is why I’m so pleased the event has received this award.”

The City of Fremantle first staged the One Day in Fremantle event in January 2017.

The event starts with a traditional smoking ceremony and other Aboriginal cultural activities at Bathers Beach before the focus shifts to the One Day concert at the Esplanade Reserve.

In its first three years the event has featured major Australian artists like Dan Sultan, John Bulter, Kate Miller-Heidke, Montaigne and Kevin Parker from Tame Impala.

It has also showcased emerging Aboriginal artists like Baker Boy, Adrian Eagle and Emily Warramara.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE ROUNDHOUSE CLOSURE DISGRACE!

 

closure

 

The closure of the Fremantle Roundhouse today is the third day out of four the very popular tourist attraction has been closed to the public. It was closed on Friday and Saturday, supposedly due to bad weather, although the weather was in no way extreme and intolerable, and today the sign states that WA’s oldest public building is closed  due to a shortage of volunteers.

Fact is that the current president and some committee members of the volunteer group have been procrastinating instead of tackling the major issues of funding and volunteers.

I was a volunteer at the Roundhouse for nine years and loved talking with tourists from all over the world, but I resigned two weeks ago after a rude email from the president in reply to my email suggestions for improvements and changes. I was told that my emails to committee were a waste of energy and he reminded me I was not on committee, indicating I should just shut up.

It is now time for the City of Fremantle to immediately take over the management of the Roundhouse as this significant building has to be open to the public.  I am happy to get involved again under new more progressive and committed management.

A school group that arrived at 1.30pm today stood in front of the closed doors and that is very disappointing.

Roel Loopers

NEW BOOK ABOUT FREMANTLE’S FIRST HARBOURMASTER

Posted in book, city of fremantle, fremantle port, harbour, history, publishing, Uncategorized by freoview on June 5, 2019

 

Freo's first harbourmaster

 

I bumped into one of the grandsons of Fremantle’s first harbourmaster late yesterday afternoon in front of the Roundhouse, so I was surprised to hear that Ron and Ian Forsyth have published a book about this important man tittled A Hazardous Life.

Captain George Forsyth (1843-1894) lived in the harbourmaster’s house next to the Roundhouse jail and was an influential man in those days.

All those interested in Fremantle hsitory, or maritime history, should buy a copy of the book. It is available in the Fremantle Arts Centre shop, where on Friday an exhibition of paintings by Captain Forsyth will open.

Roel Loopers

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