Freo's View

ABORIGINAL TOURS OF FREMANTLE

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, indigenous by freoview on June 19, 2018

 

IndigenousWA

 

I happened to bump into my good mate Greg Nannup this morning while he was conducting one of his Aboriginal history tours at Arthur Head with a group of school students.

The tours by Indigenous Tours WA are very informative and great for local people and overseas visitors to get to know more about the Whadjuk Noongar history of Walyalup, as the Fremantle region is known in Noongar.

If you want to book a tour contact email is tours@indigenouswa.com or phone Greg Nannup on 0405 630606 and check the website: http://www.indigenouswa.com

 

Roel Loopers

KAYA AND WELCOME TO FREMANTLE WALYALUP

 

The Sunday Times reports today that Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt would “seriously consider” to use Walyalup side by side with Fremantle, to acknowledge the Aboriginal history.

I would welcome that move, and Fremantle Walyalup does sound good, but question why it is taking so long to get more recognition of our indigenous history with more street and place names getting Noongar names.

It makes far more sense to add Aboriginal names than to delete the names of some of the early settlers, so what are we waiting for? The call for more Aboriginal names in Fremantle has been going for three decades, and while we now see Wanju Whadjuk Boodja signs underneath City of Fremantle ones, that is not good enough.

Fremantle Council also needs to be very clear that if it is serious about adding Walyalup to the Fremantle city name, the decision needs to be made before a major destination marketing concept has been developed, so that Walyalup can be included in all promotional material.

Ayers Rock became Uluru years ago, and the Bungles in the Kimberley are now better known as Purnululu, so there are no great obstacles that prevents our leaders to introduce more Aboriginal names for places of significance.

Roel Loopers

COLOURFUL FREMANTLE WA DAY OPENING

 

zzzz

 

The Aboriginal smoking ceremony to open WA DAY at the Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour attracted a good crowd. It’s always nice to see so many children at these events as they are a very essential part of moving forward with the reconciliation process.

Noongar elder Neville Collard gave a welcome to country and the Wadumbah dancers performed.

Also saying hello were WA Minister Simone McGurk, Fremantle Councillor Hannah Fitzhardinge and Federal MP in waiting Josh Wilson.

There are lots of activities, including a pocket market and of course the 6pm fireworks are on.

The weather is great so don’t waste your time and stay at home to watch TV and the Dockers lose. ; >)

Roel Loopers

IT’S NATIONAL RECONCILIATION WEEK

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, culture, heritage, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on May 27, 2018

 

Nat Reconciliation Week May 27

 

KAYA! A reminder that it is National reconciliation Week next week, so connect with our Whadjuk Noongar friends, read about indigenous history and culture or just buy a ork of Aboriginal art. There is a beautiful new exhibition at the Japingka Gallery in Fremantle’s High Street!

 

Roel Loopers

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STUNNING ABORIGINAL ART FUNDRAISER AT KIDOGO

Posted in aboriginal, art, city of fremantle, fundraising, Uncategorized by freoview on May 8, 2018

 

 

A fund raising exhibition at Fremantle’s Kidogo Arthouse, in support of Origins Centre, Balingup is a one-off opportunity of acquiring works by leading Australian artists on sale from the private collection of art curator, Christina McGuinness.

STORIES is an exhibition of paintings, prints, sculptures, ceramics and textiles collected from throughout Australia for over thirty years.

It’s only on for 3 days. Opens: 6.30pm on Friday 11 May. Last day is Sunday May 13 where the gallery is open from 11am to 5pm.

This private collection spans over thirty years of interest and love of the first peoples culture and art of this country.. Christina has not only worked in Perth supporting Aboriginal arts/artists in organisations and institutions such as Department for the Arts (now Dept. of Culture & the Arts) and Craftwest (now FORM) but also worked in commercial galleries specialising in Aboriginal art including Dreamtime Gallery and Randall Lane Fine Art.

Over the years she has visited and worked with WA communities Marribank, Warburton, Warakurna, and Waringarri Arts in Kununurra. And interstate to communities that include Papunya, Kintore, Ramingining/Arnhem Land in NT. And also Lockhart River, Weipa and Hope Vale in FNQ where she did marketing work with Hope Vale Arts and met her dear friend, artist Roy McIvor.

Now Christina wants to share most of her collection while supporting a community that is also very close to her heart and personal well-being. *Origins Centre, Balingup will be gifted the entire net proceeds of the sale in support of their Archival & Restoration Program.

Artists include: Paddy Carlton, Shirley Purdie, Lily Karedada, Peter Skipper. Pantjiti Mary McLean, Paddy Fordham Wainburranga, Nancy Petyarre, Anmanari Brown, Charlie Djurdjin, Carol Golding, Edgar Pike, Jane Alimankinni, Nyarrapyi Giles and Roy McIvor.

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STORIES OF NYUNGAR DANCING PERFORMANCE

 

Nyungar dancing

 

I have been reading the fascinating Dancing in Shadows book about Histories of Nyungar performance by historian Anna Haebich and recommend it to anyone interested in the history of our local Wadjuk Nyungar, and all the indigenous people of Australia.

The book published by UWA was gifted to me by my generous mate Paolo Gumina and I can’t thank him enough! I have already learned so many new things about WA’s Nyungar history in the first 100 pages.

The book is about corroborees  and dancing and The power of Indigenous performance pitted against the forces of settler colonisation and is a fantastic read.

One important fact I learned is that with 40,000 people our WA Nyungars are the largest Aboriginal group/tribe/nation in Australia.

The book launch was held at the New Edition bookshop in Fremantle’s High Street, so they will have copies for you to purchase. Go and get one today!

Roel Loopers

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DESERT ART AT KIDOGO ARTHOUSE

Posted in aboriginal, art, city of fremantle, culture, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on April 17, 2018

 

Kidogo 19 April opening Daisy Ward

 

PURLTIKATJA is a stunning show of work by Daisy Tjuparntarri Ward that opens this Thursday evening at Fremantle’s Kidogo Arthouse on Bathers Beach. The exhibition runs from the 19-25 April

The exhibition, curated by anthropologist Jan Turner, features canvasses from the deserts of Western Australia and in particular the Ngaanyatjarra Lands. Canvasses gathered over twenty years to tell stories, to communicate, to make explicit, Indigenous concepts, histories and family relationships. Canvasses used as tools of explanation in the contexts of land rights, native title, mining negotiations and the politics of representation. Canvasses that by their existence have provided a conduit for two worlds to come together in often difficult circumstances.

The desert woman, Daisy Tjuparntari Ward makes a guest appearance at this exhibition. An artist, a cross-cultural educator, an ambassador for her people, a political rights activist and a proud upholder of her culture. Ward and Turner have shared for thirty years an inter-cultural space, as tjurturarra [a two sister team]. Born in the same year, cultures apart, they have grown together learning much about their own and each other’s cultures.

Many of the canvasses come from the period prior to the establishment of community based commercial art centres. The artists represented in this highly personal collection come from several language groups: Ngaanyatjarra, Mantjiltjara, Pitjantjatjara and Pintupi. The artworks are tangible representations of the anthropologist’s relationships through generations and across language groups. They were collected specifically for the purpose of cross-cultural education, as visual components of an anthropologist’s toolkit.

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STUNNING ABORIGINAL ART AT REVEALED MARKET

 

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Click on photos to enlarge!

 

No doubt Pauline Hanson would not agree with the wonderful, wonderful REVEALED Aboriginal art market and exhibition at the Fremantle Arts Centre today because there is too much emphasis on Aboriginal people.

Well, Pauline, if you want to ignore 50,000 years of a beautiful people and culture and their long history in Australia just please your own ignorance. For people like me REVEALED is a great opportunity to see art from the desert, the Kimberley and down South and connect with our indigenous friends.

The atmosphere in the courtyard is fantastic and half of Perth came out to buy some stunning Aboriginal art, so go and join them!

Roel Loopers

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NOTHING BORING ABOUT GOOD FRIDAY IN FREO!

 

street art

 

Good Fridays are no longer boring! The Fremantle International Street Arts Festival already starts today in the far west of Freo, so come enjoy the fun and sunshine.

It is all happening around the Esplanade and Fishing Boat Harbour today so there won’t be any shows in the CBD. They will be added on Saturday, Sunday and Monday..

The shows today run from 12 noon till 5pm, with another evening show at 7pm at the new Seraphim Buskers Bar of Little Creatures. See detail above.

Also on of course is the Woylie Aboriginal Australian Kids Story Festival at the Moores Building in Henry Street.

Roel Loopers

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ABORIGINAL STORY TELLING FOR KIDS FREO FESTIVAL

Posted in aboriginal, art, children, city of fremantle, culture, family, festival, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on March 25, 2018

 

 

Hey mums and dads and girls and boys next week’s WOYLIE FESTIVAL is not something to be missed!

This Aboriginal Australian Kids Story Festival is going to be something very special that will be fun and very educational.

Story telling, music, art, dance will be on at the Moores building in Henry Street for a week, including the long Easter weekend, so plenty of days to join in.

Among those who will tell their stories are Noel Nannup, Kim Scott, Theresa Walley, Kerry-Ann Winmar, Ambelin Kwaymullina, Sally Morgan, Josie Boyle, Gregg Dreise and Dub Leffer.

There will be activities, displays, books, language and writing qorkshops and much more.

The Woylie Festiva idea was initiated by Jennifer Jackson of the lovely Paper Bird Children’s Bookshop next to the Moores building.

For more details: http://www.paperbird.com.au/event/aaksf

 

Roel Loopers

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