Freo's View

STUNNING MURAL ART WORTH A VISIT TO THE BIG SMOKE

Posted in art, city of fremantle, development, hospitality, hotel, perth, Uncategorized by freoview on August 15, 2019

 

 

It is such a gorgeous day that I hopped on the train to Perth to look at the magnificent 27-storey high art mural by artist Matt Adnate on the new hotel in Hay Street that will be named after him; the Adnate Hotel. It is amazing, but difficult to photograph so I walked up all the nine levels of the adjacent car park to see if I could find a better location, but to no avail.

It is disturbing to see how many really mediocre and ugly highrise buildings are being erected in Perth, but great that there are many fantastic large mural artworks on some of them, especially in Northbridge.

Interesting the people one meets on a train ride. A talkative woman from Albany told us that she lives on a houseboat and had just sold her fish&chips shop after five years of hard yakka, while 26 year old Daniel told us he was on his way for a swim at Cottesloe after having spent two and a half years in jail.

While engaging with them I missed catching up with my old mate Michael Thorn, the CEO of Canberra based FARE-the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education, who I saw hopping on the train as well. I wrote one of the very first articles for FARE’s blog many years ago.

Roel Loopers

CONTINUING FREMANTLE PORT ONLY SECOND OPTION FOR WESTPORT TASKFORCE

Posted in city of fremantle, containers, freight, fremantle ports, maritime, Uncategorized by freoview on August 15, 2019

 

The WESTPORT TASKFORCE has released its shortlist for future port operations and the preferred one is # 1- is the option 23 on the long list that would see a stand-alone land-backed port handling all container freight at Kwinana. The new port would extend from the Kwinana Bulk Jetty to the Alcoa jetty.

Option #2 is the long list Fremantle option 2 plus Kwinana option 24 for a shared port with a new one at Kwinana and Fremantle Port remaining as it is with some road, rail and operational enhancements.

Option # 3 would be as option # 2 but with a so called Blue Highway of shallow barges transporting containers from Fremantle to Kwinana.

From the Westport Taskforce:

While all of the assessment criteria were deemed to be of high importance, the assigned weightings are further explained below:

1. Capital expenditure and land acquisition costs, as a combined criterion, was weighted highest (18.2 per cent) as affordability was considered the most important criterion for the State. It is critical that Westport delivers an outcome that is fnancially responsible for the State.

2. Similarly, operations and maintenance costs received the second highest weighting of 16.4 per cent, as the fnal option must be commercially viable and affordable for the long-term.

3. Land use compatibility was weighted third at 14.5 per cent, as the impacts of expanded road and rail corridors, increased freight movement and/or a new port would be signifcant on nearby residences.

4. Marine environmental impacts were weighted highly at 12.7 per cent as a result of strong community support for this criterion.

5. Terrestrial environmental impacts were also weighted highly at 9.1 per cent, again in acknowledgment of the importance of this value to the community.

6. Net amenity impacts – such as impacts on recreation, visual amenity and beach use – were weighted equally at 9.1 per cent, based on strong community feedback around these issues.

7. The ability to expand the infrastructure (scalability) in the long-term if required and operational effciency was similarly weighted at 9.1 per cent.

8. Other determining factors were deemed to be heritage impacts (5.5 per cent), port and transport corridor access (3.7 per cent) and land availability and complexity of acquisitions (1.8 per cent)

Roel Loopers

MORE SUSTAINABILITY FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, city planning, environment, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on August 14, 2019

 

Fremantle has updated its Sustainable Building Policy to ensure Fremantle continues to be a leader in sustainable development.

The Sustainable Building Policy was adopted in 2011 and requires new residential and commercial buildings with a floor area of greater than 1000m2 to achieve a minimum 4-star ‘Green Star’ rating.

Mayor Brad Pettitt said as a result of the policy Fremantle had become a showcase for sustainable development.

“The award winning Liv apartments in Queen Victoria Street and the Evermore development in White Gum Valley have both been designed and built to be more energy efficient, saving residents money on power bills, and both have achieved One Planet accreditation thanks to their water and energy saving appliances, solar PV, double-glazing, organic waste and recycling facilities.

The Kings Square Renewal project component by Sirona Capital will feature 5-star Green Star commercial spaces, while the City’s new civic centre will be one of the most energy efficient buildings of its size in Australia.

The refinements made to the City’s Sustainable Building Policy include allowing the use of other equivalent assessment tools, such as One Planet certification, and streamlining implementation measures to clarify how compliance will be achieved before and after construction.

In reviewing the Sustainable Building Policy, the council also voted to rescind its Energy Efficient Building Design Policy, adopted in 2000, because the Building Code, national guidelines and other state planning policies have overtaken it.

The Freo Mayor said  “It’s another example of where local governments can explore new and innovative ideas at a local level, and if they prove successful they can be adopted more broadly.”

In addition to the Sustainable Building Policy the City of Fremantle also has planning policies that allow higher density if the development meets certain sustainability requirements, such as achieving a higher energy rating, the installation of solar panels and a rainwater tank or greywater system.

The Knutsford East Local Structure Plan also offers bonuses in height and density for design and sustainability excellence.

The Knutsford precinct includes Landcorp’s ground-breaking East Village development, in which 36 homes will be powered by 100 per cent renewable energy using roof top solar panels and a shared community battery.

In an Australian first, a village micro-grid will allow residents to generate and share energy with their neighbours using an innovative energy trading platform.

Roel Loopers

R.I.P. NINGALI LAWFORD

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, indigenous, theatre, Uncategorized by freoview on August 14, 2019

 

I am deeply saddened by the sudden death of actress Ningali Lawford-Wolf who died in London over night. She was only 52 years old.

I met Ningali for the very first time when she had her one woman show Ningali in the Fremantle Moores building in 1994. It was brilliant and I went to see it two more times and told everyone I knew to not miss it.

Ningali was a Wangkatjunka woman who became more widely known for her role in  Rabbit Proof Fence and Brand Nue Dae.

Her beautiful energy will be missed!

Roel Loopers

 

HOW EFFECTIVE WILL NEW PLANNING PANELS BE?

 

Interesting to hear that WA Planning Minister Rita Saffioti wants to make changes to the  state’s Joint Development Assessment Panels-JDAP and reduce the panels from 9 to only 3.

Saffioti instead wants to establish a team of 10 full-time experts who would help assess major development proposals alongside local councillors. They would replace the current 48 member pool that is drawn from the planning industry.

I am not sure how effective it would be when the full-time experts would work with local councillors or if it would remain very much as it is at present at JDAP meetings where local councils are under-represented with two councillors versus three other panel members.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE’S TWO HARBOURS

 

Port

FBH

 

There is a lot of activity going on in the Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour with ships being repaired and maintained until the season up north starts again.

At Fremantle Port two huge RoRo vessels are delivering hundreds of vehicles so that is always an impressive sight as well.

Roel Loopers

BEACH STREET DEVELOPMENT ON THE WAY?

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, property, residential, Uncategorized by freoview on August 13, 2019

 

 

Australia 1.jpg

Australia 2

 

Good to see activity on the  Beach Street site next to the Australia Hotel. From memory, and please correct me if I am wrong, an eight-storey residential building was approved for the site by Fremantle council, so hopefully that is what is happening.

Roel Loopers

FREO KINGS SQUARE UPDATE

 

KS 4

KS 3

 

I am one of many people in the Fremantle community who believe that the Kings Square Redevelopment Project is a positive one for our city, so I walk by every day to have a look at the progress made.

The fencing around the two Sirona Capital buildings have been removed so one is able to get a glimpse of the interior and things to come.

The work by MG Group on the public realm has also started and we will soon see new cobblestones, pavers and concrete pavers. MG will also create soft landscaping, lighting, seating, CCTV and more, so things are happening and changing fast at our city square.

I took the photos above mid morning today.

Roel Loopers

FREO MAYOR REPLIES TO SOLAR FARM CRITICISM

Posted in city of fremantle, community, environment, local government, solar, Uncategorized by freoview on August 12, 2019

 

I believe it is fair and reasonable to give Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt a right to reply to the attacks in the West Australian and the concerns raised by members of the Fremantle community  in regard to the proposed Solar Farm in South Fremantle.

I have published all comments I received about this issue, so here the media release by the City in Fremantle in full:

The West Australian has published another misleading and inaccurate diatribe by Paul Murray (Tipping point for solar plan, 10 August 2019), this time attacking the City of Fremantle’s efforts to establish a solar farm on the former South Fremantle tip site.

Before addressing the main issue of the solar farm, Mr Murray couldn’t resist having another dig at the City’s sustainability credentials. 

Mr Murray claims the City of Fremantle’s carbon emissions have increased 49 per cent since 2009. This is incorrect.

Where Mr Murray has got it wrong is that he has confused carbon offsets purchased by the City with our emissions.

Previously the City purchased ‘green’ energy from Synergy at a premium price, as well as carbon offsets to offset other emissions like fleet vehicles. The Council made the very rational decision in 2013 to stop buying expensive green energy and instead buy cheaper ‘black’ energy along with additional carbon offsets. We used the money we saved to invest in our own renewable energy.

The purchase of these additional offsets has not only resulted in more than 150,000 trees being planted in degraded areas of the Wheatbelt to offset the City’s carbon emissions, but it has also been more cost effective for our ratepayers – something I would have thought The West Australian would applaud.

And while the amount of offsets purchased by the City now compared with 2009 has gone up, the City’s emissions have actually gone down. This could have been simply explained but Mr Murray didn’t bother to ask.

As for the solar farm itself, the main concern seems to be that the former South Fremantle tip is a contaminated site.

This is not news. We know it’s a contaminated site. It has been for decades.

If it wasn’t a contaminated site it would have had houses built on it, or it would have been turned into a sporting field.

The whole point of the solar farm project is to make productive use of a site that would otherwise remain a wasteland.

The management plans for the solar farm have been approved by the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation, the Department of Health and an independent contaminated sites auditor.

The City made getting approval from these agencies a condition of the project in order to safeguard the community. We have always said this project would only proceed if it could be done safely, and the expert advice says that it can.

A solar farm would be a light touch, with the panels specially designed to sit on the surface of the soil. There would be minimal disturbance of the soil and no disturbance of the contamination buried underneath.

Far from being a bombshell, the presence of quarantine waste at the tip site is well known. Previous site investigation reports commissioned by the City refer to the use of the site by AQIS for the deep burial of quarantine waste and these reports were considered in preparing the Site Management Plan for the solar farm.

Nevertheless, the City is checking with state government health and environmental agencies if they require more information about the safe management of quarantine waste, and will ensure that any further advice is complied with.

The issue of ‘glint and glare’ was considered by the City as part of the development approval. The simple response is that photovoltaic cells are designed to absorb light, not reflect it. 

Mr Murray also referenced the public information session which had been ‘strangely cancelled’.

This session was postponed, not cancelled, because most of the questions the City and solar farm developer Epuron were being asked were about technical aspects of the construction of the project. It made sense to delay the meeting until a construction contractor was appointed by Epuron so they could be available to answer those questions. Nothing strange, just common sense.

The West Australian has now published three opinion pieces by Paul Murray attacking me and the City of Fremantle, and yet not once has he asked me any questions or sought my comments. Worse still, when I sent my own response to The West Australian after the first attack piece they refused to publish it.

I have no problem being asked legitimate questions or with the City’s operations being scrutinised, but I expect a fair right of reply. Considering Paul Murray is the former editor of this once esteemed publication I would have expected higher journalistic standards.

It’s sad to see that Perth’s one and only daily newspaper has sunk to such depths.

and to make it abundantly clear. I would welcome a solar farm but only if it does not impact on the health of anyone in our community, and those nearby in Cockburn. There cannot be any compsomises on this.

Roel Loopers

PIPES FOR FREMANTLE STARTS TODAY

Posted in city of fremantle, traffic, Uncategorized by freoview on August 12, 2019

 

Pipes 1

Pipes 2

 

The Pipes for Fremantle project to replace old water pipes in the Fremantle CBD by Water Corp has started today in Bannister and Collie streets.

Roel Loopers

%d bloggers like this: