Freo's View

THREE BINS FOG(O) FOR FREMANTLE

 

Three bins CoF

 

The City of Fremantle is moving towards the introduction of a new three bin system for household waste and recycling.

If introduced the new three bin system will include:

Weekly collection of a new 240 litre FOGO bin (with a lime green lid)

Fortnightly collection of the existing 240 litre co-mingled recycling bin (yellow lid)

Fortnightly collection of a new 140 litre general waste bin (red lid)

The City of Fremantle is part of the larger Southern Metropolitan Regional Council (SMRC), where local governments in southern Perth work together to provide waste and recycling services for our residents.

Since 2016 CoF have been working closely with the other member councils to assess the merits of the three bin system, including a trial with 7000 homes in the City of Melville.

The results from the trial so far have been better than expected, with the bins being used correctly and less contamination of the FOGO bins than anticipated.

Subject to final approval, the three bin system will be introduced to more than 13,000 residential households in Fremantle in July and August next year.

The roll-out will include high-profile education program to let people know what to put in each bin and how the system will work.

Because of issues with access and space the roll-out will not include high-density areas like the city centre and some town houses, commercial properties or residential complexes with more than four units, although this will be subject to review over time.

The new system will mean the City will need to carry out an additional 400,000 bin lifts per year.

The capital cost of setting up the system – including purchasing the new bins – will be around $1.2 million, while additional ongoing operational costs will be between $250,000 and $350,000 per year.

FREO TO RECYCLE MORE AND BETTER

Posted in city of fremantle, climate change, environment, Uncategorized by freoview on October 6, 2017

 

Fremantle’s recycling centre in Montreal Street has doubled in size, with more capacity for recycling metal, batteries, clothes and e-waste like TVs, computers and monitors.

The recycling centre will now be open to the public from midday to 4 pm on Fridays and from 8am to 4 pm on weekends.

The City of Fremantle has also started a home collection service for people over 65 years of age, where the City will collect white goods, e-waste and mattresses from the doorstep.

This will also start in late October. Check the CoF website: http://www.fremantle.wa.gov.au

 

Roel Loopers

Vote Roel for City Ward!

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ILLEGAL DUMP REMOVED FAST

Posted in city of fremantle, pollution, rubbish by freoview on May 25, 2017

 

 

My Freo’s View blog might not change the world but it does make a difference sometimes in Fremantle.

The illegal rubbish dump on the corner of Suffolk Street and South Terrace, that I reported about on Tuesday morning, is already being cleaned up. Three skip bins were being filled with the waste yesterday.

That is an amazingly fast response from the City of Fremantle and I thank the officers involved and the elected members who took the issue on. Well done all!

And thank you also to resident Kim D’Alton who made me aware of the issue.

 

Roel Loopers

IT’S A BLOODY DISGRACE!

Posted in city of fremantle, rubbish, Uncategorized by freoview on May 23, 2017

 

K

It is an utter disgrace that the vacant property on the corner of Suffolk Street and South Terrace, opposite the Fremantle Hospital, is being used as an illegal rubbish dump!

It is unacceptable that people believe they can just do about everything and I doubt the many shopping trollies were thrown over the fence by someone, so is the owner responsible for it?

Rubbish attracts vermin, rats, seagulls, etc and is a health hazard that needs to be removed with urgency.

On your bike City of Fremantle and get the crap removed by the property owner!

Roel Loopers

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THANK YOU TO VOLUNTEER BEACH CLEANERS!

Posted in beaches, environment, fremantle, rubbish by freoview on October 16, 2016

beach-cleaning

 

Thank you, thank you, thank you! to all those dedicated volunteers who regularly clean up our beaches from the rubbish people leave behind or throw into the Indian Ocean.

It is an utter disgrace that there are so many people who believe others will clean up after them, as we see also at markets, festivals, concerts etc. where people simply walk away and leave food and drink containers as if it is none of their business to dispose of it properly in amply supplied rubbish bins.

I spotted a small group of Tangaroa Blue Conservation Volunteers at Fremantle’s Bathers Beach this Sunday morning. Well done!

Roel Loopers

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HOW TO MAKE FREMANTLE MORE LIVEABLE

Posted in city of fremantle, development, planning by freoview on July 10, 2015

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt has summarised his fact-finding visit to some of the most liveable European cities on his blog and I have copied it here with my remarks and suggestions in Italic bold. I believe this should be a discussion the Fremantle community needs to have and a think tank would be nice to sit around with a few experts but also lay people like myself who are interested in urban design:

 

Brad Pettitt: Taking the European lessons learned and where Perth is at today I decided to have another go at defining the key ingredients of liveable and sustainable new developments. I think it is not as hard as is often make out and that these key ingredients can be narrowed down to a ten simple ingredients. These ingredients or perhaps commandments, however, are not etched on stone tablets  so I’d appreciate your feedback on what I might be missing: Ten Ingredients for liveable and sustainable urban design:

  1. Gentrification is not the same as rejuvenation. Mandate a diversity of housing types, sizes and levels of affordability.

Roel: Gentrification is the rejuvenation of old run down buildings and in larger buildings, e.g. the Woolstores opposite Clancys, has the opportunity for diverse housing that would rejuvenate that area.

  1. Invest in high quality public parks and spaces for people to meet and recreate in. Make space for spontaneous community to flourish and especially for children to enjoy.

 Roel: Small surprises scattered around the city for children so they can explore and discover and linger and do activities, but not massive playgrounds was something we talked about with David Engwicht when he had community sessions in Fremantle, but nothing has come from it.

  1. Plant street trees and lots of them. Trees are wonderfully generous towards even the dullest modern architecture.

Roel: We have very few trees in the CBD and that should be improved. It breaks up the monotony of building facades and streetscapes. Beach Street and High Street east could be tree-lined welcoming boulevards for example.

  1. Activate the street level with ground level shops and cafes. There should be a different business every ten metres on high streets and these ground floor usages should be diverse, meet local needs and be open diverse hours. This is essential to creating a “cities of short distances”.

Roel: Retail diversity, good shop fronts and window displays are missing in Fremantle, and Notre Dame University still occupies too much ground level space that needs to be activated in the West End. It has been part of the Memorandum of Understanding with UNDA for years now, but they have done little to implement reactivation of their ground level properties. That is disappointing.

  1. Embed sustainability features into the design from the start. Water and fossil fuel based energy is going to be a lot more expensive in coming decades and our designs should plan to be future proof.

Roel: Why can’t we start in Fremantle with a policy that requires all new buildings to have solar energy and rain water collection. It would make a big difference over time.

  1. Embed high quality and high frequency public transport into the development from the start. Preferably light rail or street cars that create investor certainty and influence a denser built form.

Roel: I love trams/light rail, but Fremantle does not have the population numbers for it yet to make it financially viable for private investors. The short-distance shopping experience with more localized deli’s etc. should be encouraged.

  1. Traffic calm streets. Keep cars to fringe of residential developments or at least design them so cars don’t dominate. Local streets are for people so make cars last in the transport hierarchy.

Roel: This is what they do so much better in many European cities. Prioritising pedestrian amenity in local streets and making safe places for kids to play in the streets is the way to go. Laneway access to carports instead of street access would be good where it can be done.

  1. Waste removal and storage needs to be well planned and designed into new developments so high levels recycling can occur and other waste turned into energy not just landfilled.

Roel: Waste removal away from streets and maybe create collection points could be something we should look at.

  1. Greater urban density is essential for our centres to be more liveable and sustainable. Global evidence suggests there is a sweet spot between 4 and 8 floors. There is no need to obsess over the height of buildings though; it’s normally not the most significant amenity factor if you get the rest right.

Roel: Height should not be the main factor of concern, but design and building quality should be. We in W.A. compromise far too fast and approve bland, boring, mediocre, and really unacceptable, design and that does not make our cities more liveable. What we need is diversity, higher density and outstanding design, the heritage of the future we keep hearing about but that is never built. The City of Fremantle Council, the Planning Department and the Design Advisory Panel need to show a stronger front and tell developers that Fremantle does not want mediocre concrete boxes.

Brad: Mandate and integrate the above. This requires risk and leadership but future residents will thank you for it.

Roel Loopers

FREO’S MASSIVE WASTE COLLECTORS

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, WASTE by freoview on June 3, 2015

bins

Those in North Fremantle who claim Freo Council does not look after them can be silent now. These massive rubbish bins I photographed near the Propeller Cafe this morning are hopefully the start of a Fremantle wide roll out in the more frequented and tourist areas of the city where ugly plastic wheelie bins are still creating visual pollution.

Not sure why one of these bins was not made a recycling bin and disappointing the COF still needs to use plastic bin liners because it is probably the most practical way.

Roel Loopers

ONE PLANET BUT MANY CHALLENGES

Posted in carbon, environment, fremantle by freoview on May 29, 2015
Reflection of Victoria Hall by Roel Loopers

Reflection of Victoria Hall by Roel Loopers

I went to a CUSP organised One Planet talk at Victoria Hall yesterday that coincided with this morning’s blog on Malmo by Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt, who is on one of those fact finding tours to liveable cities. Brad raves about what the city has done and believes that some of it could be implemented on the Works Depot site at Knutsford/Amherst streets.

At Victoria Hall Dr Vanessa Rauland gave a talk on carbon, and she will do carbon classes in Fremantle schools as well in the future. Also speaking was Katy Anketel from the South Fremantle Senior High School and the City of Fremantle environmental officer whose name I don’t know.

Most of what I heard yesterday, and what Brad Pettitt wrote on his blog, makes sense, but I am skeptical about how we can change the ingrained Australian culture of the Great Australian Dream, and single storey houses with front and backyards, and the car and waste culture we have in our country. Only education will change that so Vanessa Rauland’s school education will be a good start, but it will also mean that probably this is going to be slow change that won’t happen overnight.

There is no doubt for me that we need to learn to embrace higher density in our cities and as long as the buildings are well designed and human scale I have no problem with it. It is essential that high density buildings along traffic corridors are well sound proofed and emphasis should be on human comfort and amenity and public spaces, roof gardens, etc.

We also need to insist that developers design large residential areas so that houses can be built to take advantage of the sun, and I am all for legislating that new dwellings need to have solar power and rainwater tanks, and maybe some form of grey water use. We also need to insist that houses are being built properly with double glazing, and insulation against heat, cold and noise. The way buildings are positioned and designed for our climate will also make a big difference.

Brad Pettitt writes that the former port area in Malmo has been designed to exclude garbage trucks and that waste is sucked to areas outside the suburb where trucks can pick it up. Great idea, but it will add cost to buildings, so maybe government incentives could be introduced here in Western Australia.

There is a lot we can learn from how countries with high population are attacking the carbon and other environmental problems, but we need to stay away from comparing Fremantle with cities that are very different and much much larger. If we remain realistic we can make the changes needed that will have a big impact.

Dr Vanessa Rauland suggested it is better to do things on a smaller scale as we have more control over it and it might become more achievable as well. The solar farm in South Fremantle will be a good example of what a community can do, while a windfarm is probably done better the way they do it in Victoria where councils combine and work together to buy a large area well away from their communities and put a windfarm there.

There are a lot of exiting things we can do to stop the madness of waste and pollution and we need to start with education and communication that is realistic and leave ideology at home. I really enjoyed the talks at Victoria Hall yesterday and was inspired by them.

Roel Loopers

HOW WE CAN HANDLE WASTE BETTER

Posted in environment, fremantle, pollution, WASTE by freoview on February 16, 2015

“International zero waste experts, Professor Emeritus, Paul Connett, St Lawrence University, Canton New York and Professor Steffen Lehman, Head of Architecture and the School of the Built Environment at Curtin University, a zero waste and planning expert, will together with Mr lee Bell, heavy metals expert to the International Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Elimination Network (IPEN) and National Toxics Network (NTN) will be participating in a panel discussion, taking questions from the public about the four incinerators recently approved by the WA EPA and alternative solutions.

This is an incredible opportunity to hear from some of the worlds leading experts on the dangers of incineration and the pathways towards sustainable zero waste solutions for Western Australia.

The south metro region has been targeted for two massive incinerators making this an environmental health and justice issue for all south metro regional councils, their constituents and the environment.

As such all WA local governments are under pressure from regional councils to commit to long term waste management contracts to secure the vast waste streams needed to fuel the waste to energy incinerators planned for WA. With four incinerators approved in WA now, this pressure is set to increase. To understand how this dirty energy industry is being promoted, this article may be of interest to you.
http://www.energyjustice.net/content/zero-waste-landfill-how-incinerators-get-promoted

Don’t miss this great opportunity. Tuesday 17th Feb 2015, 6pm, Lotteries House, 2 Delhi St, West Perth. (on the Freo train line City West train stop)

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LET’S NOT WASTE OUR FUTURE

Posted in environment, fremantle by freoview on February 11, 2015

 Paul Connett, Professor Emeritus in Environmental Chemistry at St Lawrence University in Canton, New York will share his expertise and scientific knowledge about incineration impacts and safer zero waste solution. 6pm Tues 17th Feb 2015 Conference room Lotteries West House, 2 Delhi st, West Perth.

Dr Connett is also author of Zero Waste Solutions: Untrashing the Planet One Community at a Time.

This public forum is brought to you by The Alliance for a Clean Environment and Zero Waste WA.

The WA EPA has approved four waste to energy incinerators for WA, despite claims that these technologies will increase recycling and provide renewable energy. The reality is that they are the dirtiest and most expensive form of energy production, releasing more ghg’s per unit of energy than both coal and gas, as well as toxic persistent organic pollutants, for which there is no safe level of exposure.

Where these plants operate elsewhere in the world they undermine the recycling sector by having to burn recyclable materials to maintain commercial viability. This is not the sustainable waste management future WA needs or deserves.

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