Freo's View

FREO THINKS BIG ABOUT SMALL HOUSING

Posted in city of fremantle, housing, lifestyle, living, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on March 29, 2018

 

I am a bit lazy because of the flu and fever I have, so just some points I copied from this media release  by the City, as I could not attend last evening’s committee meeting:

The City of Fremantle has given its final approval to a ground-breaking new approach to infill housing in suburban areas, called the ‘Freo Alternative – Big Thinking about Small Housing’.

Council last night voted to change the City’s Local Planning Scheme and adopt a new planning policy to stimulate development of a wider choice of housing in Fremantle’s suburban areas while still maintaining what people value about their neighbourhoods.

State government has set density targets across the metropolitan area to cater for population growth and limit urban sprawl, but poorly planned or inappropriate infill developments are often met with a backlash from local residents, and don’t always match housing needs.

The proposed planning scheme amendment and policy will now be sent to the Minister for Planning for final determination.

The Freo Alternative is the result of more than three years of research and community engagement. Because of the widespread concern about the impact of infill development in our suburbs, Fremantle wanted to create a shared community vision of the future of housing in the city

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt said “We needed to come up with a way of delivering more diverse and affordable housing while retaining the established form and feel of the streestcapes and neighbourhoods that people love about where they live.”

The Freo Alternative project began in 2014 when the Australian Urban Design Research Centre and local architects were engaged to model different small housing types and test if they could work in a Fremantle environment.

That was followed in 2016 with a widespread community engagement campaign to establish what attributes the community most valued about their suburb and the benefits and challenges of small housing types.

The key themes to emerge from the consultation included having a range of housing choices, good access to transport, retention of open spaces and trees, good quality design, sustainability, affordability and encouraging community interaction.

The proposed amendment to Fremantle’s Local Planning Scheme establishes seven special control areas throughout the suburbs with special provisions for small infill development, as an alternative to traditional single lot subdivision.

Key provisions include:

Only applies to lots larger than 600 square metres
Dwellings to have a maximum floor area of 120 square metres
Maximum of three dwellings on lots of 750 square metres or less
Minimum of 30 square metres of outdoor living area per dwelling
Developments to have higher than standard energy efficiency ratings, and include solar panels, rainwater tanks, grey water systems or meet best practice accessibility standards
A minimum of 70 per cent of the entire development to be open space
At least one large tree to be retained or planted for each dwelling
A maximum of one parking bay per dwelling
Developments to be referred to the City’s Design Advisory Committee to consider design quality.

Freo Alternative will initially be applied to specific locations within the City of Fremantle, in sections of White Gum Valley, Samson, Hilton, O’Connor, Beaconsfield and Fremantle that meet certain criteria regarding proximity to public transport, existing lot size and housing stock, and heritage streetscapes.

To be reviewed in four years, Freo Alternative may then be rolled out across further locations.

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QUALITY THE KEY FOR SMALL INFILL DEVELOPMENT

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, housing, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on March 19, 2018

 

The City of Fremantle’s Strategic Planning and Transport Committee will this Wednesday deliberate the implementation of Scheme Amendment 63 for Small Infill Development.

Small houses and so-called granny flats are popular but rare in Fremantle, so there is a need for them. However it is essential that PSA 63 does not become a license for a glut of unsightly portable mining dongas and sea containers in backyards as a form of alternative housing. Design quality needs to be one of the priorities when planning officers decide on approval.

You can read the entire agenda item on the City’s website. Click on Agendas and Minutes.

I have selected and copied some considerations addressed in the agenda below:

The Freo Alternative is an investigation into alternative housing forms for Fremantle’s suburban areas, to address gaps in provision.

The second stage of the Freo Alternative is a proposed amendment (no. 63) to the City’s Local Planning Scheme No.4 (LPS4 or Scheme) and a local planning policy (LPP3.20) for small infill housing in specific areas of lower density coded residential land in the City of Fremantle. The purpose of the proposal is to increase housing choice for smaller households in Fremantle’s suburban areas while maintaining what people value about their neighbourhoods. The approach focuses on the scale of housing, rather than the traditional metric of number of dwellings per land area.

The major themes that emerged from these discussions with the community were: location, housing choice, built form, sustainability, open space, trees and landscaping, community, and car movement and parking.

following spatial aspects contributing to the negative impact of infill housing:

reduction in tree cover

doubling in roof cover, crossover and paved area

decrease in usable outdoor space including private garden, open space and living areas

increase in areas required for vehicles including vehicle parking and manoeuvring

increase in impermeable hard surface.

The modelling and further research brought up a number of additional considerations. Based on this, council resolved to further refine the previously agreed principles, including a cap on the number of small houses, 70% open space and 25% DPZ requirements, to ensure a resultant scheme amendment achieves the purpose of providing diverse and affordable housing types in the City, whilst also retaining the character of the area.

Ensure good quality design outcomes including design that is responsive to local character and context.

The design of a development contributes greatly to the visual interest of the building.

Roel Loopers

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