Freo's View

ONE STEP CLOSER TO FREMANTLE HILTON DOUBLETREE HOTEL

Posted in accommodation, city of fremantle, development, hotel, local government, tourism, Uncategorized by freoview on December 3, 2019

 

blobid0_1575275697618

 

Waiting for the development of the Fremantle Hilton Doubletree hotel by the SKS Group has been like the theatre play Waiting for Godot, where two people wait for Godot but he never turns up, so it is a huge Christmas present for Fremantle that the SKS Group now appear to be serious about the development with new plans submitted to Fremantle Council.

It is for a seven-storey, 168 hotel rooms, 45 residential apartments, five shops, two commercial units, a bar and a restaurant on the Point Street carpark site.

A public information session about the proposal will be held on 9 January 2020 from 5:30-6pm at the City of Fremantle’s administration offices at Fremantle Oval, 70 Parry Street, Fremantle.

The plans and associated documents are available on the City of Fremantle’s My Say Freo website or can be viewed during business hours at the City’s customer service desk at Fremantle Oval.

The deadline for public submissions is 14 January 2020.

The plans will then be considered by the Fremantle Council’s Planning Committee before being referred to the Joint Development Assessment Panel for a final decision.

The Doubletree by Hilton proposal is just one of many hotel developments in the pipeline for Fremantle.

The City is also assessing a new application to redevelop the Woolstores shopping centre, which includes a 141-room hotel along with new commercial office space, retail outlets, police station, and a child care centre.

Work is currently underway to convert a row of the historic Warders Cottages on Henderson Street into a boutique 11-room hotel with a new indoor and outdoor bar and dining area nestled between the rear of the cottages and the Fremantle Markets.

Plans have also been approved to transform Fremantle’s state heritage-listed Police and Courthouse complex into a hotel and restaurant precinct.

For more information and to have your say on the Point Street proposal visit the My Say Freo website.

Comments Off on ONE STEP CLOSER TO FREMANTLE HILTON DOUBLETREE HOTEL

MORE FREMANTLE CBD DEVELOPMENT STARTING

 

Dev 1

Dev 2

 

Very good to see the start of another development in the Fremantle inner city, with builders McCorkell taken possession of the former Warders Cottages in Henderson Street next to the Fremantle Markets.

The site which is owned by the Hougoumont Hotel people will become a tiny boutique hotel and a tavern at the back between the cottages and the market.

At the former Energy Museum in Parry Street the Match group has put signs up that they will commence with the residential M/27 development there as well, and just down the road at Adelaide Street the Yolk property group has also indicated they will be starting with the Little Lane residential building soon as well.

If, as expected and I hope, Silverleaf Investments will get the go ahead for the Woolstores hotel development, that will also start in the first quarter of next year, so things are very much on the move in good old Freo!

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on MORE FREMANTLE CBD DEVELOPMENT STARTING

LIV IN THE PAST ADVERTISEMENT

Posted in city of fremantle, property, real estate, residential, Uncategorized by freoview on November 15, 2019

 

LIV

 

A full-page advertisement for the LIV apartments in today’s Fremantle Herald shows how important it is to have local knowledge when one starts marketing.

It is no doubt my ignorance that I have never heard of Space real estate, but a Google search shows they are in Cottesloe. That must be the reason then that they use a very old photo of the Little Market Street Piazza, where Sandrino left well over a year ago, and Kailis Fish Cafe in the Fishing Boat Harbour also had a coat of paint since the published photo was taken.

Love Summer Living in Freo the ad shouts. Yes, we do, but we don’t live in the past Space. A little care for detail goes a long way when one advertises.

If you are interested in buying an apartment at Queen Victoria or Quarry Street: 1 Bedroom $ 380K, 2 Bedroom 455K, 3 Bedroom 950K. http://www.livapartments.com.au

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on LIV IN THE PAST ADVERTISEMENT

STAMP DUTY REBATE. BUY AN APARTMENT IN FREMANTLE NOW!

 

STAMP DUTY REBATE

 

BUY AN APARTMENT IN FREMANTLE NOW!

Apartment and unit buyers will get a rebate worth up to $50,000 on eligible properties under a two-year scheme announced by the WA State Government today.

The rebate will be available for two years to any buyer who signs a pre-construction contract for a new residential unit or apartment in a multi-storey development.

Multiple rebates will be available to the same applicant and there will be no cap on the purchase price.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT UPDATE

 

DSC_5739

 

Good signs for Fremantle! The M/27 residential development by the Match group of the former Energy Museum at Parry Street is getting closer to realisation with only seven units left, so pre-sales have been going well.

The Yolk property group have also indicated they will be starting soon on the Little Lane residential development on the former Spotlight site next to Target, so that would be two major residential developments in the hart of the Freo CBD.

Roel Loopers

BEACY HOME OF MANY ANGLES

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on August 19, 2019

 

DSC_5294

 

No, this photo was not taken somewhere in the south of Europe but in McCleery Street, Beaconsfield. All those angles just fascinated me when I walked past it today.

Roel Loopers

Comments Off on BEACY HOME OF MANY ANGLES

BEACH STREET DEVELOPMENT ON THE WAY?

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, property, residential, Uncategorized by freoview on August 13, 2019

 

 

Australia 1.jpg

Australia 2

 

Good to see activity on the  Beach Street site next to the Australia Hotel. From memory, and please correct me if I am wrong, an eight-storey residential building was approved for the site by Fremantle council, so hopefully that is what is happening.

Roel Loopers

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF THE ROYAL GEORGE HOTEL?

 

 

It is always a sad thing to see the beautiful Royal George hotel in East Fremantle so neglected and not knowing what the future of the heritage listed building will be.

Saracen Properties bought the hotel last year and came up with a beautiful restoration plan for the building, but to be able to do the costly restoration they also wanted to build a 21 storey apartment highrise behind the old building. That was refused and the Town of East Fremantle council has now approved a scheme amendment for the site that only allows a maximum of seven storeys, and that is apparently not enough and not financially viable for the developers to go ahead with the restorations.

So what will happen now? The building has been vacant and neglected for far too many years and while the Friends of Royal George were yelling and screaming against Saracen’s planning proposal they are not very vocal about the building remaining unused and not cared for.

Come on East Freo, urgent action should be taken!

Roel Loopers

QUARRY STREET DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES

 

The first item on Wednesday’s Fremantle Council Strategic Planning and Transport Committee is an interesting and challenging one because it is about the City-owned properties 9-15 Quarry Street.

Proposals for the development of the sites have been controversial and not to the liking of local residents who want to retain the low-rise streetscape on the southern side of Quarry Street while it is more likeley that developers would want to build medium to high density there.

The officers recommend to:

Introduction of a uniform zoning of Mixed Use and residential density of R80 with a plot ratio of up to 1, across the lots.

Introduction of specific building height limits and setbacks, to reflect the site’s location and facilitate a transition between high and low density.

Introduction of policy controls to include specific boundary wall, overshadowing, interface and pedestrian access link controls.

Councillors and staff held an on-side workshop on April 1 this year and the agenda state that:

The following broad parameters were discussed at the informal Councillor workshop:

Priority for residential land use given the need to encourage more people to live near central Fremantle, without excluding the potential for a modest mixed use component;

A residential coding of a medium-high density (achieving an equal or greater yield to that under current zoning – previously estimated around 34 dwelling units – refer to December 2018 report);

Diversity of dwelling types is preferred but should not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

Building height up to 4 storeys (reflective of provisions already applicable to Lots 2 and 1 and its associated sub-area) in the centre of the site with lesser heights on the boundaries with existing low density residential (including that to the south-west);

A higher quality design outcome is desired on site, as far as this can be achieved through traditional planning processes (noting the much stronger emphasis on this aspect established in the new R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA);

Existing vegetation should be encouraged to be retained but not be prescribed beyond the new requirements recently introduced into the R-Codes Volume 2 by Design WA;

There should be specific provision on where boundary walls should be permitted, along with minimum setbacks for upper floors to limit bulk and overshadowing on neighbouring properties;

Pedestrian access should be incorporated through the site to provide a connection to Fremantle Park and to potentially activate the ‘dead’ corner at the back of the site

The site walk-around reinforced local community concerns about excessive bulk and height, impacts on amenity, the suitability of the site to accommodate non-residential uses and concerns about design quality. Support was expressed for the proposed pedestrian connection into Fremantle Park.

There have been suggestions made to use the sites for age-care and affordable housing and Slavin Architects released plans on how good low-rise development could be achieved at Quarry Street.

The sites are very well located close to the railway station, high frequency buses, the Leisure Centre and Arts Centre, shopping, schools, Fremantle Park, Princess May Park, etc.

It will have to be seen if developers are interested at all as there are a lot of apartments still vacant at Heirloom and LIV and the proposed Hilton development could not manage any pre-sales of the apartments on offer there.

The residential development of the former  Energy Museum, which is very close to 9-15 Quarry Street has also not eventuated although the Match group has stated it will go ahead with it.

Any other ideas for the sites? Share it with the Freo community!

Roel Loopers

WHAT IS GOOD TASTE IN BUILDING DESIGN?

 

I think all of us who often complain about the mediocre new architecture we are getting in Fremantle should be delighted that the new DESIGN WA guidelines will apply from today on, but I am quite skeptical about the impact it will have, because good design is like good taste. It is very personal and hard to quantify.

Often when I have slammed the design of buildings others have commented they liked what I believed was atrocious architecture, so why would expert panels be any different in their different taste and preferences? Who dictates what good taste and good design is?

The new DESIGN WA guidelines are all about aesthetics and a review panel of 50 people will decide which planning proposal is in good taste and which one is not. The design review panel comprises of people from architecture, urban design, planning, and landscape architects plus more from heritage, public health, sustainability and engineering. It will be near impossible to reach consensus in such a big group I fear, so Chair Geoff Warn, who is the WA Government Architect, will have a big job ahead of him.

DESIGN WA has got rid of the controversial R-Code system applied up to now, so I wonder if Fremantle and other local councils will also do that. I’ll ask the Fremantle Planning Department if changes will be made in that regard.

I believe that our cities and communities deserve much better design than what we largely have been getting lately, especially for substantial apartment and office buildings. Retaining the tree canopy or providing significant numbers of trees and plants and creating much better streetscapes and public realm will be a very positive step forward. Let’s hope it can all be realised.

Roel Loopers

%d bloggers like this: