Freo's View

FREMANTLE BUDGETS FOR ROAD IMPROVEMENTS

 

The City of Fremantle budget for 2018-19 includes a $2.5 million program to improve and maintain roads. Major resurfacing works have been scheduled for sections along Hampton Road, Rockingham Road, Lefroy Road, Marine Terrace and High Street.

There will also be works to improve road safety for motorists and pedestrians along Stirling Highway, Marine Terrace and McCabe Street.

All of the road millings that are dug up as part of the resurfacing program will be collected and re-used in other city projects, like the upgraded Recycling Centre and the new Cappuccino Strip carpark.

By using recycled materials the City does not have to buy new limestone road base and does not have to pay to dispose of the stripped road material in landfill, so it delivers a significant saving.

The upgrade of a second section of South Terrace in South Fremantle is also included in the budget, with work on the first ‘node’ at the intersections of South Terrace, Little Lefroy Lane and Sydney Street beginning later this month.

The location of a second ‘node’ is still to be confirmed subject to more community feedback. It involves reducing the width of the road, changing the colour of the road surface and widening the footpath, as well as adding new paving, street furniture and trees.

The changes will encourage drivers to slow down, make it safer for people to cross the street and will increase the amount of alfresco space.The works are designed to create a more pedestrian-friendly environment and will also allow the removal of the much debated and disliked temporary speed humps in that section of South Terrace.

Interesting to note that the budget also includes $25,000 to develop a concept plan to create a new town square in front of the Fremantle Railway Station and upgrade Queen Street

A new town square and the relocation of the bus port has been debated for very many years but the reluctance of the Public Transport Authority to move the bus port further east means the idea has had a few plans drawn up but was never realised. Why there is need for yet another costly concept plan I do not understand. I won’t hold my breath that we will see any changes there soon.

Roel Loopers

TRANSPERTH BUSSES TAKE SHOPPERS’ PARKING

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, parking, public transport, Uncategorized by freoview on June 20, 2018

 

busses

 

It is disappointing when one wants to take advantage of the free before 11am parking for residents in the City of Fremantle when Transperth busses use local streets near the Woolstores shopping centre as overflow parking spaces.

These five busses took up 17 car bays at 10am this morning. It’s not on!

Roel Loopers

GOLDEN MORNING AT FREO RAILWAY STATION

Posted in city of fremantle, photography, public transport, trains, Uncategorized by freoview on May 16, 2018

 

station

 

I had an early 6.30am catch up coffee with former Fremantle Councillor Dave Coggin at Il Cibo this morning. He is a man I greatly respect and really like and he is now working at the WA Premier’s Department.

When we walked out of the cafe Dave pointed at the railway station, saying “Look at that light!” I wandered over of course to take this stunning photo of it.

Roel Loopers

IT’S ALL ABOUT GETTING THE DEVELOPMENT BALANCE RIGHT

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, local government, planning, Uncategorized by freoview on March 14, 2018

 

There is a big conundrum about development in Fremantle and elsewhere. The difficult question about urban infill in older character places is how much, how big, how high, how good, what kind of and when to stop.

We are getting very confusing messages from people, with many moving from WA to Melbourne because it is so European, whatever that means, while I read that many people in Sydney want to move out and go to Adelaide, Perth and Brisbane because Sydney is getting too big, traffic too mad and property prices too high.

Feedback from tourists is that most of them love Fremantle but are not impressed with the bland mediocrity of many of the new buildings in Perth, while they adore Freo’s gorgeous heritage West End.

What is good and appropriate development for Fremantle and how much is needed? We can forever argue about what we like or not but for example the development of the dormant Henderson Street in connection with that of Kings Square and the future development of Fremantle Oval is a good thing I believe.

One can rightly question though if the massive planned Woolstores shopping centre development and the eight-storey Little Lane on the Spotlight site are just a bit too much for Fremantle and overkill.

Does Fremantle need more highrise apartment buildings or should is start encouraging micro lots of around 100sqm for terrace housing/townhouses, that would suit our inner city much better.

I believe it is all about balance, but developers and city and state planners are not getting the right mix in my opinion.

I left Sydney in 1985 because real estate was simply unaffordable there while house prices in Perth were very cheap then, and it looks like this is still going on, although Fremantle is relatively expensive to move to.

It is time the WA state government organised a symposium on how much and what kind of development is needed, so that it can give better guidance to developers and local councils and its own JDAP and SAT.

It is imperative to show real respect for character cities like Fremantle, Subiaco and others and develop with restraint. To keep pushing for urban infill when the targets might be unrealistic will be detrimental to the uniqueness of our heritage cities.

Roel Loopers

STATE GOVERNMENT CREATES URBAN INFILL MESS

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, lifestyle, living, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on February 26, 2018

 

The issues Fremantle faces with urban infill, demanded by the State Government, are not unique to our city as an editorial by POST community newspapers editor Brett Christian shows.

Claremont residents are up in arms against proposed high density near the Loch Street train station. Christian writes “Distress in voices heard in the council chamber revealed the anxiety felt by home owners selected for high density infill.”

“These are real people with real fears who cannot be dismissed as being NIMBYs.”

Brett Christian says that the WA Government is keen to forcibly cram more housing units around transport hubs, which leads to permanent changes in the lifestyle.

The editor writes that Government planners naively believe that new residents will abandon their cars and use public transport when evidence proves the opposite.

Let me note here that public transport use in Perth has dramatically decreased over the last years and that only a very small percentage of those living within a ten minute walk from a railway station do use the train to work, according to government figures.

Christian rightly laments that local councils are being caught in the middle of the infill mess created by the state.

In Fremantle we are getting more and more inappropriate and unacceptable high rise development that will change the unique character of our city forever.

Yes, we need more people living, working and staying here to boost our local economy, but any development needs to show sincere consideration for the heritage, streetscapes and amenity, and that is not happening.

Fremantle Council has done well to encourage substantial development but it now needs to scale back and stop approving mediocre architecture in our inner city.

Tell developers and architects that if building proposals are not exceptional and great they are not good enough for Freo!

Roel Loopers

 

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LINLEY LUTTON: INFILL FAILS UNIQUE QUALITIES OF OUR CULTURE

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, Uncategorized by freoview on January 13, 2018

 

I came across an article published in September 2017 in The Conversation  by internationally renowned Perth city planner and architect Linley Lutton, who sadly died this week, and want to share some of Linley’s thoughts with you.

Lutton writes that retrofitting cities is poor planning, justified in the name of sustainability, and that the results are often substandard living environments that show no relationship to local content.

The dispersed city form means we have to work, sleep, shop and socialise in different parts of the city.

High-density living works well where streets are at human scale, buildings  are interesting and where there are plenty of public meeting spaces, but in Australia we build jam-packed home units with minimal public open space, Linley Lutton says.

That is the failure to understand the unique qualities of Australian culture and how people choose to live.

Lutton writes that recent research shows that the great majority of Australians reject apartment living and that the majority of those living in an apartment would not repeat the experience.

It is seriously questionable to randomly subjecting suburbs to high-rise apartments, and so is the public transport corridor argument, or building infill near suburban railway stations.

Public transport only works if people actually use it, but Bureau of Statistics figures show that in Perth less than 10% of those living within walking distance of a train station actually travel to work by train.

Linley Lutton writes that there are three essential requirements of a good city:

  • Cities must nurture and stimulate healthy human growth and community development.
  • Local communities must meaningful participate in city planning.
  • The unique cultural and physical context of a city must be respected.

 

These are all very important points to consider for Fremantle Council for its strategic infill targets and the introduction of buildings that are too high for our human-scale character city!

The funeral of Linley Lutton, a man I greatly respect and like, will be held this Monday January 15 at 3.30 pm at the Karrakatta Cemetery.

 

Roel Loopers

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WEDDINGS AND TRAINS NOT A GOOD MARRIAGE

Posted in city of fremantle, Uncategorized by freoview on November 28, 2017

 

train wedding

 

The West Australian reports today that the WA Public Transport Authority has warned wedding photographers that it is illegal and dangerous to take photos of married couple on railway tracks.

In Fremantle we see this happen many times during the week at the railway crossing in front of the Roundhouse,  and also where wedding parties and tourists stand in the centre of the road in High Street to have their photos taken with the gorgeous heritage buildings in the background.

In the world’s biggest nanny state one should also be aware that it is dangerous for married couple to get their photos taken with their feet in the Indian Ocean because of great white sharks, rips, surfers, etc.

Taking photos in WA at daytime could also result in sun burn and melanoma and the bloody flies are a nuisance as well.

It is dangerous to follow the directions of those  irresponsible wedding photographers and jump in the air or off things, because one could sprain an ankle or do other damage. It is a bloody dangerous world out there!

And having your photos taken while you are totally pissed ain’t a good look either. Just saying. ; >)

The safest location for wedding photos is to just stay at home, because once we leave that safe heaven harm could come to us. Be aware!

 

Roel Loopers

 

PUBLIC TRANSPORT ART IN FREMANTLE

Posted in art, fremantle, public transport authority, Uncategorized by freoview on June 26, 2017

 

The PTA has commissioned a new Aboriginal artwork on a switchbox at Little High Street in Fremantle, after local residents requested the beautification of the area opposite the Roundhouse.

I have no idea who the artists are, so if anyone knows, let me know please so I can credit them.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE LIGHTRAIL NOT A PIPE DREAM

Posted in city of fremantle, lightrail, transport, Uncategorized by freoview on June 25, 2017

 

How nice to hear local councils in the Fremantle area working together for a change, instead of viewing each other as competition.

They could not agree on local government reform, council amalgamations and the Roe 8 highway, but now the South West Group of Cockburn, Fremantle, Melville, Kwinana, East Fremantle and Rockingham are planning ahead together for light rail, according to a report in today’s Sunday Times.

A Fremantle to Murdoch lightrail corridor is a high priority according to the report, but also a loop with Rockingham and the coast.

There is no doubt in my opinion that lightrail from Fremantle to Rockingham would be used extensively by locals and tourists alike and connect the two cities.

The South West Group report also considers lightrail from Fremantle to Canning Bridge and linking Cockburn and Fremantle.

Long-term planning by local councils for lightrail and traffic corridors is essential to pin point where new residential and commercial development should be encouraged so that planing schemes can be introduced to accommodate that.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt told the Sunday Times that local councils had a role to play in planning transit systems as they would need to rezone areas for transport hubs.

Lightrail has been on Fremantle’s wish list for a long time but low residential figures make it difficult to build a sound business case for it. However the development boom in Fremantle and Cockburn and along to coast to Rockingham is starting to make lightrail a very good option for the not too distant future, and we need to plan for that now.

Roel Loopers

 

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT A PRIORITY

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, city planning, development by freoview on March 15, 2017

There is an interesting opinion piece in the West Australian today about the limitations of urban infill and the necessity of regional development.

Higher density in established suburbs and near railway stations and bus lines is not something that can go on indefinitely, so other alternatives need to be considered.

The WA state government has long been talking about decentralisation and to its credit has moved some departments out of the Perth CBD, but private businesses and large corporations still appear reluctant to open offices outside of Perth.

Most big law, mining and advertising companies are in Perth or West Perth and Fremantle has been struggling for decades to attract large companies to relocate here.

While it is good that Fremantle has so much residential, commercial and tourist development at the moment, there is only limited space in the inner city and we need to protect the unique character and heritage attraction of our city.

But decentralisation and city planning needs to become a much bigger picture than that even and fast rail transport to places like Northam, Albany, Bunbury and Geraldton should be considered.

Mining companies should start building permanent accommodation for their personnel in the Pilbara to decrease the high-polluting FIFO process and increase the regional population.

The Perth metropolitan urban sprawl needs to stop because it is not sustainable and too expensive, but filling up character older suburbs with ugly high concrete boxes is also not the solution.

What our politicians lack is big visionary thinking when it comes to planning the regional cities of the future. Planning is still far too much Perth-centric that will only worsen the traffic, public transport and environmental problems that are inevitable when too many people are squeezed into city living.

Innovative integrated regional development should be a priority for the new McGowan Labor government.

Roel Loopers

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