Freo's View

FREMANTLE HOSPITAL NEW LOCATION FOR GENERAL DENTAL CLINIC

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, health, state government, Uncategorized by freoview on April 2, 2019

 

The Fremantle General Dental Clinic has now moved to Fremantle Hospital after the WA State Government spent $ 2.99 million on the relocation of the clinic, which was on the corner of Parry Street.

The service has not only been relocated but improved and expanded.

The new clinic has nine treatment rooms, a dental laboratory, sterilisation areas and staff support rooms. It will offer patients:

  • Dental examinations and assessments;
  • Radiographic examinations and interpretation;
  • Preventive and prophylactic services;
  • Periodontics;
  • Extractions and minor oral surgery procedures; and
  • Fillings, dentures and some crown and bridge services.

Dental care in the new Fremantle Hospital clinic is only available to eligible patients, such a people who have a Pensioner or Health Care Card,

Roel Loopers

DRAFT POLICY OF FREMANTLE’S AGE FRIENDLY CITY

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, community, local government, seniors, social services, Uncategorized by freoview on March 22, 2019

 

Below is the first draft of the Age Friendly City policy that will be fine-tuned by City staff and Elected Members in the next months. There are many departments and agencies involved so it needs to go through a thorough and inclusive process to make sure that all the details are right and nothing is overlooked:

INTRODUCTION

The City of Fremantle’s Strategic Community Plan 2015- 2025 aims for Fremantle to be an environment where it is easy for people to live safe, happy and healthy lives. It seeks to celebrate and support diversity and improve community inclusiveness and participation for all.

According to 2016 Census data the City of Fremantle has both a higher median age and a larger proportion of people over 55, compared to Western Australia. As a destination city it also attracts visitors of all ages.

The City’s journey to becoming an age friendly city started in 2010 and in 2016 the City was accepted as a member to the World Health Organisation Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities. The WHO age-friendly cities guide highlights eight interconnected domains that cities and communities can address to better adapt to the needs of older people:

  • The built environment
  • Transport
  • Housing
  • Social participation
  • Respect and social inclusion
  • Civic participation and employment
  • Communication
  • Community support and health services.

To prepare a new Age Friendly City Plan a review of the City’s progress commenced in 2018. A Working Group with representatives from community members, key organisations, City staff and Elected Members met throughout the review to guide the process. Over 150 people were engaged either online, through surveys, at events or via one-on-one meetings and their input informed the development of new and revised actions for the City.

Purpose of the Plan

The purpose of the Age Friendly City Plan is to prioritise positive ageing opportunities for the Fremantle community and a great place for older people to visit.

The plan is organised in line with the eight WHO age friendly city domains and covers actions the City can lead, facilitate or promote as well as advocate for where the responsibility sits outside local government. The Plan represents a whole-of-organisation approach and will be supported with an implementation plan. To maintain its status as a WHO global age friendly city the plan will need to be evaluated in three years.

  1. Social participation

Provide a range of lifelong learning activities that encourage older people to participate in community life.

1.1 Provide activities and courses at various locations that encourage participation and increase social participation.

1.2 Provide affordable programs that encourage older people to try new and different sports or other forms of physical activity.

1.3 Advocate and promote programs and initiatives which target respect, inclusion and social participation.

  1. Community Support and Health Services

Assist people in Fremantle to age positively and actively by providing appropriate information and support to maximise health and wellbeing.

2.1 Improve communication between the City and Fremantle-based aged care providers by offering opportunities for networking meetings.

2.2 Facilitate opportunities which provide information to older people to navigate ageing well and healthy lifestyles.

2.3 Promote My Community Directory which provides details on the range of services and activities for older people in the Fremantle area.

  1. Civic participation and employment

Create opportunities for older people to actively participate in the community through civic involvement.

3.1 Community engagement will be accessible, well-promoted and flexible, engaging older people to have their say.

3.2 Support local organisations to recruit and retain volunteers through Volunteer Fremantle.

3.3 Facilitate opportunities for older people to share their skills and knowledge on a paid or voluntary basis.

  1. Communication and information

Provide accessible information on aged care services in a variety of formats.

4.1 Promote the programs and activities provided by the City of Fremantle for older people in a range of formats.

4.2 Ensure the City of Fremantle website meets accessibility guidelines set out by Vision Australia and the Disability Services Act.

4.3 Community engagement opportunities are well-promoted and offered in a range of formats.

  1. Outdoor spaces and buildings

Ensure that older people have the same opportunities as other people to access the City’s buildings, facilities, parks, reserves, playgrounds and beaches.

5.1 Regular upgrades in the Fremantle local government area where better seating, shading, footpaths and pedestrian crossings are required as part of ongoing capital works.

5.2 Provide accessible community facilities for older persons.

  1. Respect and Inclusion

Provide activities that promote positive images of older people of diverse cultures and increase community participation.

6.1 Celebrate the achievements of older people through a range of events, activities and media.

6.2 Maintain a range of initiatives that encourage inclusive, intergenerational and cross cultural relationships.

6.3 Provide educational opportunities and workshops for older people that enable access to new technologies.

6.4 Provide opportunities for older people to contribute to community led programs and activities.

  1. Transportation

Ensure that older people are able to move around their community easily through public and active transport.

7.1 Advocate to the State Government authorities to improve public transport for older people.

7.2 Continue to contribute to the funding of the Central Area Transit (CAT) Service to allow for easy mobility around the Fremantle central business district.

7.3 Advocate for a light rail transport system in Fremantle.

7.4 Encourage mobility and social connection by promoting trails for walking, cycling or access by mobility device in the Fremantle local government area.

7.5 Advocate for shelters and seating to be provided at all bus stops.

  1. Housing

Ensure that there is provision of housing which is diverse and affordable to meet the current and future needs of the older people.

8.1 Advocate for statutory changes to the planning system to promote accessible and ageing appropriate housing.

8.2 Establish partnerships with local community housing providers to enable the provision of affordable housing in large development projects and sites.

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FREMANTLE AGE FRIENDLY CITY PLANS

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, community, local government, seniors, Uncategorized by freoview on February 26, 2019

 

The City of Fremantle are aiming to make Fremantle the most positive place it can be for our seniors.

The City of Fremantle is a registered Age Friendly City through the World Health Organisation and are currently preparing their new age friendly city plan to guide the direction of the City over the next five years.

To prepare the new plan a review of the City’s progress commenced in 2018. A Working Group, of which I was a member, with representatives from community members, key organisations, City staff and Elected Members have met throughout the review to guide the process.

Over 150 people were engaged either online, through surveys, at events or via one-on-one meetings and their input has started the process of developing  new and revised actions for the City in regard to our senior citizens.

You are encouraged to read the draft Age Friendly City Plan 2019- 2024 and share your feedback in the survey below by Tuesday 19 March 2019. Copies will also be available in the Wanjoo Lounge at Fremantle Library.

https://mysay.fremantle.wa.gov.au/agefriendly2019

Roel Loopers

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FREO AGE FRIENDLY WORKING GROUP

 

The City of Fremantle has established an Age Friendly City Working Group, which comprises of age care specialists and members of the Fremantle community.

The members of the committee are Steve Waddingham of Alzeimer’s WA, Stuart Tomlinson of the Fremantle Multicultural Centre, Julie Ray of Amana Living, and Leah Gray of the Hilton Foley Village and Souther Cross Care.

Community members are Betty Garlett, Sylvia Lang, Cathy Hall, Ella Peaty, Rob Fittock and Roel Loopers.

During the last election campaign in October voters expressed a need for a ‘circle of elders’ to cater for the fast ageing population, and Fremantle Council acknowledged that this was a good idea.

Roel Loopers

AGEING POPULATION IMPACTS ON ECONOMY

Posted in aged, city of fremantle, economy, health, hospitality, retail, seniors, Uncategorized by freoview on July 23, 2018

 

The media reports that the Western Australian economy has bounced back is positive, but the reasons for the closure of many hospitality outlets and the downturn in retail sales is always only ever explained with internet shopping and the mining bust. Not one expert opinion I have read considers that the fast ageing population is also a reason for people spending less money on non essential items.

Just in Fremantle I know several people whose life has changed since they went on the government pension, because they simply no longer have the money to socialise with friends in pubs and restaurants. Some tell me they can’t even afford to entertain at home, because cooking a meal for friends might cost 50% of the money of their weekly food expenditure.

Many of the pensioners I talk to say they mis no longer going to live theatre plays, concerts and events, because there is not enough money in the kitty, and even going to the hairdresser, especially for women, requires to save it from something else.

A ‘cheap’ $ 20 breakfast or $ 35 dinner in a nice cafe or restaurant are beyond their reach, so they feel on the scrap heap of society, where no one really cares how they are surviving and what their quality of life is.

The government pension does not keep up with the constantly increasing costs of just about everything, but that does not appear to be an issue for our political parties. Once one pays rent, telephone, internet and for the car, there is very little left for food, and hardly ever enough for a meal and glass of wine somewhere nice. Even doctors’ visits need to be kept to a minimum because most GPs don’t bulk bill any more, hence far too many old people use the free service at the emergency departments at our public hospitals.

It is an outrage that many old people live in cold homes in winter because they don’t have enough money to pay for gas and power, and it is an even greater outrage that thousands of people sleep on the streets of our cities.

The very fast ageing of the Australian population is very real, and it does affect the economy, so it is time for our politicians to start preparing for a future where over fifty per cent of the population will be over 60 years old. It is even more tangible and imminent than global warming, so it is time to change the priorities a bit and start looking after our older people a whole lot better.

Roel Loopers

 

Henty's

HOW WILL FREMANTLE DEAL WITH AGEING POPULATION?

Posted in city of fremantle, local government, seniors, Uncategorized by freoview on October 30, 2017

 

The Committee for Perth has released their latest FACTBase research about our ageing population and Fremantle Council better take note off it.

Some of the key findings from the report were:

In 2016, 50% of West Australians were of working age, there were 29 children for every 100 people of working age, and 21 adults aged 65 for over for every 100 people of working age.

The Productivity Commission has predicted that the demographic changes in WA are going to happen so quickly that we will find ourselves in a demographic environment that is entirely unfamiliar to us.

By 2060, it is predicted that 1 in 4 West Australians will be aged over 65 and there will be 25 centenarians for every 100 children aged under one.

Most elderly people ‘age in place’. This could be a significant issue because urban design, transport systems and access to services in outer suburban locations tend to be less suitable for retirees.

A central tenant of delivering positive economic outcomes will be achieved by allowing older people to remain active and valued members of the workforce and the community.

There is currently a shortfall of 3,500 beds for the elderly across Western Australia.

Aged care providers say there needs to be reduction in red tape, so they can manage the demand for their services.

There needs to be more diverse conversations happening across the broader community about the issues and opportunities associated with an ageing population.

The success of delivering positive economic outcomes for ageing West Australians is to innovate, adapt, maximise public sector efficiencies and take advantage of technology to reduce the financial impacts of ageing and capitalise on the opportunities offered by living longer, healthier lives.

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STRONG YOUTH FOCUS FOR FREO’S MATURE POPULATION

Posted in city of fremantle, local government by freoview on December 13, 2015

Many candidates for the recent Fremantle local government election wanted the City to focus on its core responsibilities and that is local government for local people, but is the City of Fremantle doing that? There appears to be a strong emphasis on youth culture and I wonder why that is because the figures don’t stack up.

According to the agenda of Thursday’s Annual Electors Meeting 75% of Freo residents are over 25 years old and 38% of those are over 50 years of age. That leaves only 8% of people between 18-24 years old and 18% under 18. (There is a small discrepancy here as the numbers add up to 101%)

While no one wants to see Fremantle become a retirement village one has to wonder why there is so much done for those under 24 years old and so little for those over 50 who are in the majority. This is even more staggering when all the national statistics show a rapidly ageing population in Australia, so when will the City of Fremantle start catering for those?

Roel Loopers

OLDIES ALSO NEED INNER CITY LIVING

Posted in fremantle, lifestyle, residential, seniors by freoview on July 2, 2015

Talking about higher density is a bit of a no-no in Fremantle, where many in the community believe that high-density automatically means highrise, but we know from European countries that that does not have to be the case and 5-8 storey buildings will do the job and look a whole lot better than massive 20+ storey residential towers that create social issues as well as visual pollution.

Strangely when we talk higher density in Perth we talk about young people and families moving into inner city apartments, but rarely do we hear there is a need for seniors to move there as well and that needs to be addressed by developers and local and state governments.

Research in the USA has found that once seniors who live in the suburbs loose their license and right to drive a car, the public transport systems fail them and older people often become hermits without a social life, because they have to depend on friends and family to drive them around, so there is a need for them to relocate closer to the inner city.

The problem though is that inner city rents are quite a bit higher than those in the burbs, so how can seniors afford to live there? Whilst I absolutely understand the need for privacy I believe we need to find a new and cheaper way of accommodating seniors and other on low incomes, be that with one bedroom flats or bedsitters and shared use of kitchen(s), laundry and communal dining rooms, and maybe even gophers.

With a fast ageing population in Australia we need to find creative ways in dealing with what could become a serious issue in the near future. That might well mean that we need to accept that we don’t all need to have our own washing machine and stuff we only use once every ten days or so, and that sharing is cheaper and reduces the need for individual laundries, dining areas and kitchens in each and every apartment. I know I would be a huge compromise and change in lifestyle and thinking, and I am not even sure I would like it for myself, but it could be a way of finding solutions to deal better with an ageing population.

Roel Loopers

HIGH DENSITY LIFESTYLE QUESTIONED

Posted in fremantle, high-density, living by freoview on December 8, 2014

It was very interesting to read two articles in two newspapers on the weekend about high-density living. In the West Australian Kate Emery wrote that Western Australians don’t have the mentality for high-density housing and that the W.A. Planning Commission(WAPC) is proposing to State Government to change the R30 and R35 buildings codes because there has been a huge community backlash against inappropriate and out of character high buildings being detrimental to the overall community amenity. The WAPC also wants to increase the minimum parking requirements for new dwellings.

In the Subiaco Post renowned urban planner and architect Dr Linley Lutton writes under the headline “Frantic Density Push Is Alarming” that …”experts warnings from those outside the industry are rarely heeded.” And that the warning for a huge population growth in Perth is an unrealistic and alarmist over-estimation of future growth.

We have already witnessed that planning schemes by Local Governments are completely overridden by State Government agencies and are a real worry to especially older suburbs like Fremantle Subiaco, Cottesloe, etc.

Lutton writes “High-density European and Middle Eastern cities work because they provide a diversity in stimulation, convenience and interaction opportunities. The piazzas, squares, courtyards, parks, shops and streets of these cities are where people live and grow. Most high-density development in Perth offers none of these things.”

 The article continues that Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show that only 5-7% of people living near suburban train stations actually use the train to go to work. A 2010 study in Australia, Canada and the USA showed that the main users of public transport were those living in the low-density outer suburbs, not those who live in high-density areas with railway access.

Dr.Linley Lutton also warns for health impact of high-density living along main streets near traffic noise, especially on the older population, because poor air-quality and noise trigger mental and physical health problems.

Lutton suggests that self-sufficient suburbs with a variety of housing densities and with ample employment opportunities, and less need to commute far and wide to work, would be a better way to plan for the future, and I could not agree more. In an ideal world no one living in Rockingham should have to commute to Joondalup for work.

Fremantle Council also needs to heed these warning and realise one cannot change a decades-old entrenched culture and lifestyle overnight. Change happens slowly and only when the community embraces it and takes ownership of it. Collaboration and integration is what is needed, not a narrow focus anti-car mentality.

New developments like Kim Beazley and Stevens Reserve offer very little in lifestyle enhancement, with no green lingering nodes between buildings and only a strip of green on the periphery. As Lutton points out, the piazzas, parks, town squares, etc. are needed to create a lifestyle people embrace. Much better and more creative and innovative city planning is required in Fremantle and the ambiance of the CBD needs to be improved with modern seats, shade structures, green areas, more trees, play nodes for children and better and creative lighting.

Higher density living will only be embraced by the community if it supports and enhances the Freo lifestyle and when it allows for diversity.

Roel Loopers

QUALITY LIVING TO AGE WELL AND HEALTHY

Posted in aged, fremantle, living by freoview on October 15, 2014

Two articles in the West Australian today caught my interest. The first one is about a study by Edith Cowan University on green public space, something we in Fremantle often talk about but where we don’t seem to be making any inroads.

The ECU study found that people who live in suburbs with good green spaces feel healthier than those who don’t have a park in the vicinity, but also that the quality of the space is more important than the proximity to where people live. Pioneer Park in Freo is a good example of a boring unattractive open green space that the City has not invested much money in, hence not many people use it. It’s the chicken and the egg thing.

The second article is about supplying spaces for “active-ageing” with an estimation that 5,7 million Australians will be over the age of 65 by 2030.

One of the requirements according to the article is less emphasis on rush-hour public transport but a steady supply of busses, trains, lightrail, so seniors can use them during the day and seven days a week.

There is also the need for new model ag-integrated buildings, and of course public open space to relax and meet people is essential to that as well.

Roel Loopers

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