Freo's View

TERRACE HOUSING BETTER INFILL FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 23, 2018

 

M:Group North Coogee

 

Depending on City of Cockburn planning approval the North Coogee Shoreline development should see some interesting architecture inspired by the Donnybrook Quarter in London.

MATCH of the M/Group intends to build 2-3 storey terrace houses along intimate streets that end in a city square there.

It’s the kind of development I would love to see more of in Fremantle, rather than high apartment buildings.

Fremantle is the ideal place for terrace housing as urban infill, instead of boring highrise.

Roel Loopers

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GOOD ENOUGH NOT GOOD ENOUGH FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in architecture, buildings, city of fremantle, city planning, development, Uncategorized by freoview on April 28, 2018

 

It is rather strange that the Fremantle Herald front page this week features a letter to the editor about JDAP rejecting the Woolstores shopping centre site development plans, instead of publishing an editorial about it.

There is little reason for the Fremantle Society president to gloat about the JDAP decision because it would not be in the interest of Fremantle if the development plans are abandoned. However Silverleaf Investments also need to be aware that second best and it’s good enough will not be accepted in Fremantle.

To realise Fremantle’s rejuvenation, that will hopefully kick start the economic recovery, we need development investors like the Match Group, Sirona Capital, Silverleaf, and others, but they know Fremantle Council is so desperate for new development that developers think that just about anything will be accepted.

The Fremantle Society during my presidency fought tooth and nail to stop PSA 49 but pressure from the then owners suddenly saw Council approve 11 storeys on the Woolstores site, when Mayor Brad Pettitt had only days before expressed he would not vote for double digit development, so nine storeys would be the maximum.

But PSA 49 was very clearly about only granting additional discretionary height if development was of excellent design quality, and the Woolstores plans, rejected by Fremantle Council and the WA Joint Development Assessment Panel-JDAP, clearly were not.

It appears that developers and architects still have not got the message that the Fremantle community demands creative and innovative design, and sadly Fremantle Council, JDAP and the State Administrative Tribunal also still have not got that point, as they have too often allowed mediocre development that is hurting Fremantle’s unique character. Council is so desperate to achieve rejuvenation of the inner city and economic recovery that it overlooked design flaws, out of fear of upsetting developers.

The new Sirona Capital buildings at Kings Square are not outstanding and neither is the planned and approved Hilton Doubletree hotel development on the Point Street carpark site. The LIV development along Queen Victoria Street is repetitive boredom and the Quarry Street side of it is architecturally so unresolved that it hurts my eyes and soul.

In the development pipeline are also the already approved very boring eight storey development next to the Australia Hotel and the equally uninspiring Little Lane development on the former Spotlight site next to Target.

I do get it that developers want to make as much money as they can and I don’t have a problem with that, but the JDAP rejection of the Woolstores proposal should send a clear message that if you want more money making floorspace and height you will need to offer Fremantle something special and unique.

Not only did Fremantle’s Design Advisory Committee expert panel express that the Woolstores design was not excellent, so did the three architects who spoke for the Fremantle Society, and other architects JDAP panel member Councillor Rachel Pemberton consulted had the same opinion.

I also talked to three well-known local architects in Fremantle who told me the composition and balance of the plans were all wrong and that piecemeal changes to the design would not lift it to the highest architectural standards required to receive the bonus height.

Fremantle wants and needs development. I love modern architecture and am not off the opinion that no new development in Fremantle should be above six storeys, but like most people in the community I want to see the wow factor when it comes to new buildings here.

It is very disappointing, and I agree here with the Fremantle Society president, that the Chamber of Commerce keeps supporting any development plans, no matter how inappropriate and uninspiring. For the Chamber the motto seems to be Any shit will do as long as it is new. I expect higher standards from our business leaders.

The rubbish that is often proposed might not do great harm in Cockburn or Joondalup but it would make Fremantle a lot less attractive to visitors from all over the world. The community will not accept that and developers, architects, Fremantle Council, JDAP and SAT should listen to us!

Roel Loopers

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MATCH FREMANTLE ENERGY MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT CONTINUES

Posted in architecture, city of cockburn, development, heritage, Uncategorized by freoview on April 12, 2018

 

Energy Museum 2

Energy Museum

 

My blog post yesterday that the sale of the former Fremantle Energy Museum building means the end of the M/27 residential development by the MATCH Groups was not correct, so I copy their media release below for your info:

The completed restoration works by M/Group of the original S.E.C Building and former Western Power’s Energy Museum at the Fremantle Substation site in Parry Street, is another example of how M/Group has worked effectively with the City of Fremantle and State Heritage Council to support the integration of valuable heritage fabric into contemporary urban living.

The property, which sits adjacent to a boutique Match apartment development that overlooks parkland at its rear, has been released for sale under an Expression of Interest (EOI) campaign; opening the door for a range of potential uses.

Mr Lloyd Clark, Managing Director of M/Group, said the apartments on this site are already 35% sold, and the renewed heritage building will be on a separate green title. He said the opportunity to build a business on this site comes with inherent character and is surrounded by an established and new residential community.

“The planned apartment building, M/27 by Match, will be home to 40 boutique apartments and is due to commence construction in late 2018,” he said.

“The opportunity to take ownership of the building certainly opens the door for a ‘Bread in Common’ type food and beverage venue, although could as easily be adapted for boutique office space. The purpose of our work on this site is to, perhaps ironically, create new energy. It is a great opportunity for a potential proprietor in a great location.”

Match, which is part of M/Group, is the company behind the highly celebrated Heirloom by Match heritage renewal and is currently in the construction phase of the M/28 by Match boutique apartments in South Terrace.

The company prides itself on introducing design-focused apartment product that enhances the streetscape and activates living space in strategic locations.

The heritage works on the heritage building, undertaken by M/Group’s building division M/Construction, have included the restoration of existing brickwork, refurbishment of metal window frames and the restoration of existing large timber sliding doors.

The sale of the building is being managed by Knight Frank and more information can be obtained by contacting James Baker on 0418 912 007.

For more information on the limited number of parkside M/27 by Match apartments, visit m27apartments.com or contact 0432 660 066.

Roel Loopers

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