Freo's View

HAVE YOUR SAY ON HEART OF BEACONSFIELD DEVELOPMENT

 

190524 Davis Park structure plan resized

 

One of the key pieces in the plan to revitalise the Fremantle Heart of Beaconsfield has been released for public comment.

The Davis Park precinct is an area of 10 hectares of land bounded by South Street, Lefroy Road, Caesar Street and Fifth Avenue consisting of mostly state-owned social housing.

City of Fremantle Director of Strategic Planning Paul Garbett said the state government is looking to redevelop the area and has submitted a structure plan to guide the process.

“The state government through the Department of Communities has a policy to decentralise large pockets of social housing and redevelop the land to create a range of more diverse and affordable housing options,” Mr Garbett said.

“The Davis Park precinct currently contains around 260 dwellings that are fairly old, low-scale residential. These homes are accessed by a number of cul-de-sac roads, so connectivity with the surrounding neighbourhood is poor.

“For this reason the Department of Communities is keen to redevelop the Davis Park precinct to create a more diverse mix of housing, with both private and public housing and better connections to surrounding areas.

“The structure plan submitted by the Department of Communities shows details such as where roads and public open space will go, as well as types and locations of housing, community facilities and other land uses.

“As the authority responsible for local planning, the City of Fremantle’s role is to assess the plan and make a recommendation to the WA Planning Commission, which will make the final decision on whether the plan is approved or not.

“To help the City prepare its recommendation to the WAPC, we’d really like to hear from the local community and get some feedback on the structure plan.

“Community feedback at this stage is important because, although it doesn’t include details such as the design of new buildings, a structure plan does guide later stages of planning such as subdivision and development applications.”

The Davis Park structure plan proposes the creation of a mixed-use precinct along South Street, with retail, commercial and residential properties.

Public open space around Davis Park will be expanded and an innovation precinct will be established to provide opportunities for alternative housing styles.

Redevelopment of the Davis Park area is a key part of the broader Heart of Beaconsfield planning project, which will guide the redevelopment of surrounding areas like the Lefroy Road Quarry and the former South Metropolitan TAFE site.

An information stall will be set up at the Growers Green Farmers Markets at Fremantle College on Sunday 16 June, with the opportunity to speak with representatives from the Department of Communities and the City’s planning staff on the structure plan proposal.

For more information and to make a submission visit the City of Fremantle’s My Say Freo website. Public comments close on 21 June.

FREMANTLE HERITAGE CAR PARK

Posted in accommodation, architecture, cars, city of fremantle, heritage, Uncategorized by freoview on May 20, 2019

 

car park

 

Fremantle has so many hidden treasures and I ‘discovered’ this car park of the former warehouse at Little High Street this morning.

The entrance is at Phillimore Street and the excellent adaptive re-use of the former warehouse into residential apartments was done by Freo architect Ralph Hoare.

The unit on the corner of High Street, opposite Chalkys cafe, is for sale for just over $ 2 million as I understand it.

Roel Loopers

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VERY DIFFERENT WINDOWS OF FREMANTLE

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, Uncategorized by freoview on May 3, 2019

 

 

Very different Fremantle windows. A nice reflection of the Maritime Museum in one of them at Victoria Quay, and some terrible ones with foil stuck to them in a Cliff Street heritage building.

Roel Loopers

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LITTLE LANE BIG DEVELOPMENT FOR FREMANTLE

 

little lane 1

little lane 2

 

It looks like the Little Lane residential development by the Yolk Properties group on the former Spotlight site at Fremantle’s Adelaide Street will soon be getting under way.

Retail incubator Many 2.1 which occupies the building have just announced that their last day in that location will be Sunday March 10.

This will be the closest residential development to Kings Square, so it will be exciting to see it going up.

Meanwhile we are still waiting for the SKS Group to start on the Hilton Doubletree hotel down the road from Little Lane on the corner of Adelaide and Point streets, but I hear rumours that they might even start their Cockburn hotel before starting the very much delayed one in Fremantle and that would be unacceptable.

Roel Loopers

BETTER URBAN INFILL VERY IMPORTANT

 

WA Planning Minister Rita Saffioti has released stage one of DESIGN WA, the guidelines to improve the quality of urban infill.

One of the most heard complaints in Fremantle and all over the suburbs is the mediocre design of most of the new residential apartment and other buildings in our character cities, but planning rules and even design advisory panels have had little impact on improving the architecture and streetscapes, this will hopefully now improve, depending on how strict and strong the new policy can be enforced by local councils, JDAP, SAT and the WAPC.

Rita Saffioti’s statements says:

Design WA includes clearly defined objectives about what future developments should consider, and includes it in the revised Residential Design Codes. Objectives include:

  • Appropriate scale to respect the local character and context;
  • Minimum apartment sizes based on floor space and number of rooms;
  • Safe, healthy environments with good natural light and ventilation;
  • Development that creates walkable neighbourhoods with high amenity;
  • Green space such as shady trees for outdoor spaces and mature tree retention; and
  • Development that enhances local neighbourhoods. 

The policy will come into affect soon, on May 24, 2019, so that is a good thing.

One thing I have been wondering about is why urban infill and medium/high density buildings are demanded in older suburbs by the State Government but not in brand-new suburbs which are developed near public transport corridors. That makes no sense to me.

Roel Loopers

NO HIGHER DENSITY FOR QUARRY STREET?

 

The potential scheme amendment and zoning to R100 density for the properties at 7 and 9-15 Quarry Street in Fremantle is unlikely to proceed because of strong community objections to the idea.

The properties are owned by the City of Fremantle, which wants to sell them, but the community consultation showed that local residents are in favour of zoning the street for low-density R25 instead of medium-density R100.

Main concerns were the impact on the residential amenity of the streetscape, so the officers’ recommendation for this Wednesday Planning Committee is:

The report concludes that whilst there is planning merit in establishing a consistent zoning and suitable transitional density in this location, the complexity of developing mechanisms sufficient to address concerns raised to the satisfaction of the community, and the relatively modest increase in centre catchment/development yield likely to be achieved, does not warrant progressing the matter through all the stages of a formal scheme amendment process.

Roel Loopers

HOUSING.HOMELESSNESS.POLITICS

Posted in accommodation, city of fremantle, fremantle network, homelessness, housing, living, Uncategorized by freoview on November 20, 2018

 

Labor party leader Bill Shorten’s announcement about affordable housing and homelessness comes timely as it is the topic of this evening’s Politics in the Pubs by the Fremantle Network.

Perth Now reported this morning:

Bill Shorten has vowed to make community and affordable housing an issue at the next federal election, flagging promises beyond changes to negative gearing.

The Labor leader addressed the Community Housing Industry Association in Melbourne on Tuesday with a pitch to put struggling renters and homeless people “front and centre” in national debate.

“Nothing is more fundamental to a government’s obligations to the people than the right of every Australian to have a roof over their head,” Mr Shorten said.

He said better data about the extent of affordable housing needed to be a priority, along with better quality standards for dwellings including energy efficiency and accessibility for people with disabilities.

The Politics in the Pubs is TODAY from 7pm at The Local Hotel in South Fremantle!

It is a free event and the bar and kitchen are open, so enjoy a meal and a drink during the debate.

Roel Loopers

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LIV ART OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Posted in art, city of fremantle, property, real estate, residential, Uncategorized by freoview on November 5, 2018

 

LIV A

 

I had a whinge yesterday about the Piazza gates being closed at the LIV apartments in Fremantle’s Queen Victoria and Quarry streets, but it appears that is only happening on weekends, as the gates were open today.

It finally gave me the opportunity of photographing the fantastic Rick Vermey artwork from different angles.

Roel Loopers

MURAL BIRD ART CAN STAY! YEAY!

Posted in art, city of fremantle, lifestyle, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on October 10, 2018

 

hereo

 

The beautiful mural artwork at 1 Stevens Street can stay at does not have to been removed, after the FPOL committee of Fremantle Council on Wednesday evening unanimously passed the officer’s recommendation of leaving the art in situ.

A local resident had complained to the City of Fremantle that the gorgeous mural of native birds is an eyesore, but the elected members did not agree with that. There was not even debate about it!

Great outcome for Freo, the city of arts and artists!!! Good taste prevailed.

Roel Loopers

SHARING ART IS GENEROUS AND BEAUTIFUL

Posted in architecture, art, city of fremantle, city planning, culture, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on October 8, 2018

 

 

I was surprised to get a few negative comments about the mural artwork on the corner of Stevens and Brennan streets in Fremantle. I am yet to hear strong community protest against visual pollution such as signs all over the place, so what irks people about art along our streets?

Some people believe that individual home owners have no right to impose their art and taste on the community, and they argue that if people want these murals they should do it on the inside of the wall, or inside their house, but not where it is visible to the general public. I disagree with that.

Since humans started building structures others have had that imposed on them, be that bad architecture, ridiculous colour schemes, or garden gnomes, lions, etc.

And where would we stop if we legislated against murals and other art on private properties?  Should we ban businesses as well from beautifying their walls, and is it acceptable to have public art inflicted on us? What about bus shelters and railway stations?

Art, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder, but I believe that most people understand what crappy amateur art is, compared to good professional art, and the artwork in Brennan Street is the latter.

Roel Loopers

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