Freo's View

PETER NEWMAN WA SCIENTIST OF THE YEAR

Posted in city of fremantle, perth freight link, roe 8 highway, sustainability, Uncategorized by freoview on August 16, 2018

 

Fremantle Professor Peter Newman was awarded the WA Premier’s Award of Scientist of the Year 2018 on Wednesday night.

Newman heads the Curtin University of Sustainable Policy-CUSP and is renowned as a sustainable cities advocate. He also strongly opposed the Roe 8 and Perth Freight Link.

Roel Loopers

FREE ELECTRIC CAR CHARGING AT CAPPUCCINO STRIP CARPARK

Posted in cars, city of fremantle, electricity, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on August 7, 2018

 

The new electric car free charging points at Fremantle’s Cappuccino Strip car park are now live.

The four 22 kilowatt charging points are compatible with most electric vehicles, with a one hour charge giving between 18-40 kilometres of driving distance depending on the car.

There are also two standard 240 volt charging points, which means all current electric cars can be charged up using the appropriate cables.

The chair of the WA branch of the Australian Electric Vehicles Association Richard Baird said the new charging points would be greatly appreciated by the owners of electric cars.

“Fremantle has always supported electric vehicles and it’s fantastic that they’ve allocated four electric vehicle charging bays for the Cappuccino Strip and all EVs are welcome,” Mr Baird said.

“Around Perth there are probably about 50 or 60 of these charging points but that’s growing all the time, and as more electric vehicles are sold onto the market we’ll see more charging stations go in.

“Most people charge at home overnight but when you’re out and about doing errands these charging points are fantastic.”

While the drivers of electric cars will still have to pay for parking, charging their cars will be free.

The charging stations are just one of the environmentally friendly features of the new Cappuccino Strip car park, which was built using recycled road materials and also features solar lighting, storm water capture and water-wise native plants.

USE CARBON OFFSETS TO PLANT TREES IN FREMANTLE

Posted in carbon, city of fremantle, environment, local government, trees, Uncategorized by freoview on July 28, 2018

 

I have in principle nothing against the City of Fremantle paying carbon offsets to remain carbon neutral, but I question why the $ 50,000 allocated for it in the budget can’t be spent on planting new mature trees in Fremantle and increase the canopy in our own city.

Can someone at the City of Fremantle explain this to me please. Thank you!

Roel Loopers

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FREO’S ONE PLANET GREEN BUDGET

Posted in budget, city of fremantle, economy, environment, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on July 25, 2018

 

This will start the tongues wagging of those who are not happy with the ‘Greenies’ running the City of Fremantle. ; >)

This from the city on the budget:

The City of FremantIe is delivering on the One Planet Fremantle strategy through initiatives funded in its 2018-19 annual budget.

The centrepiece of the budget is the allocation of $46.3 million towards the construction of the City’s new administration building and library, as part of the broader Kings Square Renewal project.

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt said the aim was to make the new administration centre one of the most energy efficient buildings of its size in Western Australia.

“Our target is for the new building to be zero carbon, so it will have a sophisticated automated opening façade system designed to capture Fremantle’s famous sea breezes and enable natural ventilation for most of the year.

“It will have high-performance, well shaded windows to minimise heat loss during cooler periods and minimise heat gain in summer.

Other sustainability features will include a 240kw solar PV system, energy-efficient LED lighting and water saving appliances.

Another key sustainability measure in the 2018-19 budget is the allocation of $920,000 to implement the new three bin Food Organic Garden Organic (FOGO) waste management system.

The new FOGO system is a key step towards achieving the City’s One Planet target of a 70 per cent community recycling rate by 2020, and will also protect ratepayers from long-term increases landfill costs.

The budget also includes:

$50,000 to purchase carbon offsets to maintain carbon neutral status
$40,000 to implement the verge garden scheme
$32,784 for a new cardboard and aluminium bailer for the Fremantle Recycling Centre
$14,000 to provide Living Smart sustainability workshops
$10,000 to introduce a local container deposit scheme at three Fremantle Primary Schools
$12,000 to install solar panels on community buildings
$10,000 to implement a car share scheme
$30,000 for works and maintenance in the City of Fremantle Bike Plan
$65,000 to revise the Sir Frederick Samson Park management plan
$102,000 for coastal monitoring and assessment at Port, Leighton and Mosman beaches

For more information on the City’s One Planet strategy visit the One Planet page on our website.

 

Roel Loopers

 

WANT TO KNOW ABOUT FREO’S THREE BIN FOGO COLLECTION?

 

FOGO bins

 

The City of Fremantle will have an information stall about the FOGO three-bin rubbish collection at the GROWERS GREEN FARMERS MARKET this Sunday.

The markets at Fremantle College on Lefroy Road will be open from 8am till midday, so check out the FOGO system while you do your fruit&vegies, bread, eggs, etc. shopping.

Of course great breakfasts and coffees available as well as take away food for lunch and dinner.

Roel Loopers

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ENJOYING SOLAR POWER WITHOUT SOLAR PANELS

Posted in city of fremantle, electricity, solar, Uncategorized by freoview on July 17, 2018

 

I took the info below from Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt’s blog:

Would you like to have access to  locally produced, green, solar energy without having solar panels on your roof?

The RENeW Nexus Participant Trial is entering its first data collection and analysis phase, and are seeking interested parties to join existing participants in the next phase – a peer-to-peer energy trading trial across the City of Fremantle.

This trial will enable participants with renewable energy systems (prosumers) to trade their surplus energy with Fremantle residents who do not own a system (consumers), providing them with a cleaner, more sustainable energy alternative across the network.

As one of the world’s first trials of its kind, participation is an exciting opportunity to be at the forefront of the energy transition.

If you own a private residential property within the City of Fremantle LGA and do not own a renewable energy system, you are invited to express your interest by replying to RENeW Nexus <renew.nexus@curtin.edu.au>

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PLASTIC FREE JULY ART SHOW AT BITCHES BREW

Posted in art, city of fremantle, environment, plastic, Uncategorized by freoview on June 28, 2018

 

Bitches Brwe plastic free July art

 

Fremantle High Street framers BITCHES BREW will be involved with Plastic Free July this year

The BB Art Space will be hosting work from 3 local environmental artists, each showcasing a very different approach, using some fantastic mediums.

There will also be a special installation from the Plastic Free July Foundation on display, and raising awareness. It starts on July 1, so go and check it out!

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE FIRST TO JOIN BIOPHILIC CITIES

Posted in city of fremantle, community, local government, nature, Uncategorized by freoview on June 22, 2018

 

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The City of Fremantle is the first city in Australia to join the Biophilic Cities and will officialy do so on Thursday June 28 from 4-5.30pm in the Garden Room of the City of Fremantle at Fremantle Oval.

The Biophilic Cities Project is an umbrella term that refers to research and policy work on biophilic cities, both domestically and internationally, by Professor Tim Beatley and his team at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. Its principal aim is to advance the theory and practice of planning for biophilic cities, through a combination of collaborative research, dialogue and exchange, and teaching. Researchers at UVA partner with city collaborators, to assess and monitor biophilic urban qualities and conditions, to identify obstacles and impediments to achieving more biophilic cities, and to identify and document best practices in biophilic urban design and planning. The Project helps to foster discussion and dialogue between and among researchers (and planners and policymakers in case study cities), periodically convenes researchers and practitioners, and publishes working papers, reports and other publications that disseminate the project’s findings. Work on Biophilic Cities at UVA is supported through a generous grant from the Summit Foundation, based in Washington, DC.

Now you may ask, as I did, what biophillia is; Humans possess an innate tendency to seek connections with nature and other forms of life.

HOW TO LEGISLATE FOR BETTER CITIES?

 

 

What can a small city like Fremantle of just over 30,000 residents learn from a mega city like Singapore with over 5 million people? It was a question Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt asked when he went on a study tour with the South West Group and the Mayors of Melville, East Fremantle, Cockburn, Kwinana and Rockingham.

Yesterday at the monthly Fremantle Network event at the National Hotel the Mayor shared his thoughts and some photos, and it was a thought provoking presentation.

Brad Pettitt said that city greening was the extraordinary success of Singapore, as developers were required to create large green spaces on and around new buildings, but there is also a greening of highways, rooftops, walkways and gardens, and road corridors of trees that make large parts of the huge city look delightfully green. That is certainly a lesson we can learn from in Fremantle and in Western Australia, as European countries also do that much better and more intense than we do over here.

The largest vertical garden in the world is also in Singapore, comprising of 57,000 pot plants!

How we can legislate for it is altogether the question though. It probably needs to be done at state level, but there is always a risk that local council then lose control of their city planning.

I have suggested before here on Freo’s View that in appropriate locations Fremantle City should consider a percentage for green space, where developers are granted additional height if they create the equivalent floorspace into a green open space near or within the development.

Brad Pettitt also showed some less desirable and quite ugly highrise development that we definitely don’t want in WA.

The Freo Mayor also mentioned how massive the port of Singapore is with 35 million containers(TEU) a year.

Singapore has over 17 million international tourists a year, compared to WA of less than a million, and it is strongly branding itself as a green sophisticated city. Brad Pettitt thought Fremantle should celebrate its Aboriginal history more and make it part of our brand. We need a major attractor, Pettitt said.

The Mayor said that heritage was highly valued and protected in Singapore and that there is a lot of street activation in heritage areas, something missing in Fremantle, but there was a lack of solar energy use and Singapore was trying to catch up on that.

Brad Pettitt asked if there was a case to be made for greater hight if it helped to create better public realm, because the urban sprawl could no longer be supported in WA. “Get a train to Butler and see what we are doing!”

In that context it is good to note a change of heart by one of Melbourne’s leading urban planning experts Rob Adams, who ten years ago strongly supported densification and urban infill, but now says it has destroyed many streetscapes in the city because the public realm improvements did not eventuate when they started building highrise.

I say it again here that I would love to see a forum about what appropriate architecture, development and density for Fremantle could be, so I hope someone will organise an event that I would love to be part of.

Roel Loopers

FREO CITY FREE REUSABLE SHOPPING BAGS

Posted in city of fremantle, environment, local government, plastic, shopping, Uncategorized by freoview on June 13, 2018

 

The ban for single-use plastic shopping bags will come into effect from July 1, so supermarkets and other retailers will no longer be allowed to hand out the free plastic bags we have been using for decades.

The City of Fremantle, one of the country leaders in getting the shopping bags banned, will give away free reusable shopping bags. They can be collected from the Visitor Centre at the Townhall and at the temporary council building at Fremantle Oval.

I do have one suggestion to make and that is to decentralise the hand-out of the free reusable bags, as it is not fair to the people of Samson and other outer suburbs to have to come all the way into the city centre for it.

Why not have some of the bags for collection at the Samson Recreation Centre, the Hilton Community Centre, etc. We have become very CBD-centric in Fremantle and Council needs to improve on that!

Roel Loopers

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