Freo's View

FREO’S FIRST EQUAL OPPORTUNITY CAFE

Posted in cafe, city of fremantle, disability, hospitality, Uncategorized by freoview on February 25, 2020

 

 

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A new cafe opened today in Fremantle and should be one all of us support. The Humble Pantry is the first Freo Equal Opportunity cafe that trains and employs people with a disability or disadvantage.

Trainees produce a list of what they want to achieve and are then guided and supported to achieve that and prepare for possible employment elsewhere in the hospitality industry.

The Humble Pantry is in the beautifully restored former Boy’s School at princess May Park and part of DADAA.

There is a lovely quiet courtyard that makes the experience being in a little oasis away from the hectic of the inner city, so perfect for business meetings or keeping your secret lovers away from preying eyes. ;>)

There are wraps, pastries, salads, muffins, but no cooked to order meals.

Please do support this great initiative, Freo!

Roel Loopers

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DADAA ANTI-GENTRIFICATION ARTWORK

Posted in art, city of fremantle, development, Uncategorized by freoview on February 20, 2020

 

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This Object of Anti-Gentrification artwork by Fremantle DADAA artist Tanya Lee is in Queen Victoria Street, located between two multi-storey residential buildings.

One goes into the bunker to look out and up at the buildings through looking glasses.

The artwork is part of the No Fixed Address project where DADAA artists worked together with people from St Pat’s.

Go and have a look!

Roel Loopers

WE DON’T BUILD COMMUNITIES. WE BUILD PLACES OF ISOLATION

 

There was an interesting panel discussion NO FIXED ADDRESS, to discuss the importance of social housing and building diversity in our urban centres, in the lovely courtyard of DADAA in Fremantle’s Princes May Park, last night with Dr. Mariana Atkins, Research Associate Professor, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia and the UWA Living Lab, Dr Holly Farley, Research Fellow, Fremantle School of Architecture, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Dr. Shane Greive, Urban and Regional Planning, School of Design and Built Environment, Curtin University, Michael Piu (CEO, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre), and  Heather Thompson (Senior Assertive Outreach Worker, 20 Lives 20 Homes Program, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre).  It was facilitated by Lisette Kaleveld, Senior Consultant, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia.

Changing cityscapes are inevitable with urban infill making places such as Fremantle desirable, especially since most of the services are provided in town, and that attracts a diversity of people, including homeless ones, and those who require social and affordable housing, but we are not designing and building for that diversity and the needs of individuals. Not many local governments have the capacity and desire to change with the times, so how do you design a city for all?

People want to be connected, be in contact with nature and there is a real disconnect there, so we need to bring the community on board because it is about the collective, not individuals. To do that we need to start understanding the history of Australia and the values, and where we want to go. We need to understand the diverse perspective, and need to learn to understand the different realities. Design should not be about excluding people!

Homelessness is nothing new and has been around for decades, so the whole community needs to own the issues and solutions, but there is a lack of value judgement. It is a fallacy that homeless people are in control of their own future! We all are only a few steps away from homelessness and if we come together the solutions are in our own hands. Start a conversation and humanise the issue!

A social worker said she had met some of the most amazing, caring and resilient people one would like to meet.

Architects and developers need to start actively listen to everybody’s stories from a design perspective. Bring the focus of development back to the people! We need a change of mindset there, as the next generation of home buyers can’t afford to buy the homes of the present generation. Inter-generational housing is not available, the housing options are not there.

There is huge value in diversity in a community, and we don’t want people with similar social/financial issues all living together, there needs to be a mix and we need to understand what home means for different people. Public housing often results in people failing because of the wrong set up and location and the lack of support. For some community housing or a boarding house is better because they don’t have to look after paying bills and connect with others. Community housing is more flexible.

There is also an interesting small exhibition in the DADAA gallery, so go and have a look at it!

COMMENT:

We don’t build communities, we build spaces where people are alone, spaces of loneliness, because at the lower end of the apartment market there are no community spaces where people can connect. There are no swimming pools, gyms, roof gardens, etc. We build highrise along transit corridors, instead of building them around green open spaces where people can meet and play.

There are tens of thousands of single middle aged and older women and men who have no social life because they can no longer afford to go to pubs, concerts, festivals, theatres, etc. where they used to connect with friends and meet new people. They don’t meet anyone and get isolated. High density living does not cater for that by providing community spaces. Many single people live in a small box with no communical spaces where they can meet their neighbours and make new friends that way.

Roel Loopers

HOUSING DIVERSITY PANEL AT DADAA

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, development, homelessness, housing, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on January 15, 2020

 

As the built landscape of Fremantle’s East End begins to change, a public panel will bring together not-for-profit organisations, urban planning experts, the St Pat’s community and artists to discuss the importance of social housing and building diversity in our urban centres.

It is on Thursday, January 23 from 6-8pm at DADAA in the former Boys School building at Princess May Park.

This public panel is presented as a part of DADAA’s No Fixed Address program, a collaborative project between Perth contemporary artists, filmmakers and the St Pat’s community, based in Fremantle’s East End. Exploring themes of resilience, adaptation and displacement, No Fixed Address responds to the social and built environments of this radically changing part of the city and the significant role St Pat’s holds within our community.

FREE | RSVP essential

The No Fixed Address exhibition will be open from 5pm.

PANEL SPEAKERS:
Dr. Mariana Atkins, Research Associate Professor, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia and the UWA Living Lab.

Dr. Shane Greive, Urban and Regional Planning, School of Design and Built Environment, Curtin University.

Michael Piu, CEO, St Patrick’s Community Support Centre.

Heather Thompson, Senior Assertive Outreach Worker, 20 Lives 20 Homes Program.

Facilitated by Lisette Kaleveld, Senior Consultant, The Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia.

More information: https://www.dadaa.org.au/gallery/nofixedaddress/

 

Roel Loopers

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EXHIBITION ABOUT GENTRIFICATION AT DADAA

Posted in art, city of fremantle, culture, homelessness, housing, Uncategorized by freoview on November 27, 2019

 

A very interesting exhibition No Fixed Address that explores survival tactics, social rituals and ways of moving within and occupying public space will open this Friday at the new DADAA gallery in the former Boys School at Fremantle’s Princess May Park.

Artists Olga Cironis, Janet Carter, Hannan Jones, Tanya Lee, Lincoln Mackinnon, Mike Moshos, Rebecca Riggs-Bennett, Susan Roux and Wade Taylor collaborated with homeless people and St Patrick’s staff for this show that will deal with the gentrification of the East End of Fremantle.

There will be an exhibition, workshops, public events, installations and films.

A Carpe Noctum walking tour will be held on the 30th of November and 9th of December from 8pm to explore who has the right to occupy our urban spaces after dark.

A penel discussion will be held about housing diversity on January 23 from 6pm.

The exhibition opens this Friday from 6-8pm at DADAA.

 

Roel Loopers

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GALLERY AND CAFE FOR DADAA

Posted in art, city of fremantle, disability, heritage, Uncategorized by freoview on October 15, 2019

 

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Good to see more work going on at the former Boys School in Princess May Park.

DADAA will open a new gallery in the building next week and there are also plans for a new cafe with a lovely alfresco courtyard, so stay tuned.

Roel Loopers

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MORE ART FACILITIES AT FREO’S DADAA

Posted in art, city of fremantle, disability, heritage, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 2, 2019

 

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Very good news for DADAA in the former Boys School at Fremantle’s Princess May Park. The Stage 5 capital works have commenced!

The final redevelopment stage of the heritage-listed building will consolidate the award-winning renovations undertaken on the building over the past two years, in partnership with the City of Fremantle.

DADAA are creating enhanced digital and visual arts studios, a new contemporary art gallery and a beautiful public courtyard space that will house the Humble Pantry Fremantle Café.

Roel Loopers

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FREMANTLE FOLK FESTIVAL THIS SATURDAY

Posted in city of fremantle, concerts, culture, entertainment, music, Uncategorized by freoview on November 30, 2018

 

 

The FREMANTLE FOLK FESTIVAL is on this Saturday December 1 from 1.30 pm in Princess May Park, Clancy’s Fish Pub and DADAA.

You can check out the line up above on the poster or go to the FFF website or Facebook page for more information and ticket sales.

It is a family friendly event with activities for the kids, so no excuses for parents to stay at home. Just bring the kids!

It is going to be a gorgeous day, sp perfect for a day in the secluded park opposite the Basilica.

Roel Loopers

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LIFE CIRCUS DRAWING WITH IAN DE SOUZA

Posted in art, circus school, circus wa, city of fremantle, disability, Uncategorized by freoview on November 10, 2018

 

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I did a paparazzi on my friend Ian de Souza at Duck Duck Bruce cafe early on Saturday morning.

Ian is a great Fremantle artist, and in my opinion underrated in WA.

Tomorrow Sunday November 11 Ian will be holding life drawing classes with circus artists at DADAA in the beautiful hall of the former Boys School at Princess May Park.

It is on from 10am till 1pm and you’ll learn heaps from this fine artist, craftsman and gentle human being. Give it a try!

Roel Loopers

DRAWING CIRCUS WITH IAN DE SOUZA

Posted in art, circus wa, city of fremantle, disability, Uncategorized by freoview on November 8, 2018

 

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Celebrate circus with life drawing with renowned Fremantle artist Ian de Souza in the main hall at DADAA at Princess May Park, in the former Boys School.

It is on on Sunday November 11 and 18 from 10am to 1pm and from 1-3.30pm.

Entry is $ 20 that will go to the circus performers.

Sounds like fun. Enjoy it!

Roel Loopers

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