Freo's View

FREMANTLE WILL NOT DISAPPEAR

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, history, indigenous, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on May 22, 2019

 

 

How can we stop the ridiculous claims in the media that Fremantle wants to change its name to Walyalup? The Reconciliation Action Plan, that is out for community consultation, suggests to acknowledge Aboriginal names for our city and its landmarks, that means we add Noongar names to the English names, not replace them.

Already there are many negative comments on social media, as if our Aboriginal history is something we should be ashamed about when we should be proud that we are part of a 50.000 year ancient history.

It is not as if before British settlement this country we now call Australia was a fascist society with a past we’d better not mention. It is a huge island where Aboriginal people lived in relative peace and harmony. They lived respectfully in an often nomadic lifestyle off mother earth, in a society with strong tribal laws which kinship and tribal boundaries that were adhered to.

Men in the communities educated the boys and the women were responsible for bringing up the girls, and food was often shared in the best communal sense of extended families.

It is a proud history of stories and songlines and of sacred sites and of deep respect for nature and the earth.

Why should we not share our Aboriginal history by letting people know the names the traditional owners have for all the landmarks and rivers? It is not as if a Big Bang happened in 1829 on the west coast of this huge continent and suddenly there was population in this terra nullius, or uninhabited land. That disrespectful suggestion was soundly rejected by the High Court of Australia which acknowledged that Aboriginal people have lived here for some 50.000 years. A history of hardship and resilience to be proud of!

What is the big deal to have signs that show Fremantle and underneath it Walyalup to acknowledge that history. What is wrong with pointing out that Arthur’s Head is also known as Manjaree and Rottnest Island as Wadjemup?

The acceptance of Aboriginal names is already widespread around Australia. Most people now call Ayers Rock Uluru, the Olgas are known as Kata Tjuta, the Bungles as Purnululu, and Turkey Creek is better known as Warmun.

The TV reporter who smugly told his viewers last night that Fremantle could not change the name of the Swan River to Derbarl Yerrigan because it would need State Government approval to do so was only starting a fear campaign because all Fremantle Council might do is put some signs along the river to also acknowledge the Aboriginal name and history of the river.

No one’s history is threatened people and Fremantle will not disappear from the map of WA and Australia. Our post settlement history and names will remain and be told next to the pre European settlement history of our Aboriginal people. It is showing respect for our now shared past and future, and in my opinion it is very welcome and a long time overdue.

 

Roel Loopers

TODAY TONIGHT FILMING ARTHUR’S HEAD NEGLECT

 

 

A team from Channel Seven-Today Tonight spent most of the morning in Fremantle to film a story about the neglect of historic Arthur’s Head and WAs oldest public building the Roundhouse.

They interviewed a structural engineer about stabilisation solutions for the rockfall problem and a Roundhouse tourguide about the historic significance of the area.

It will be screened tomorrow, Wednesday at 6.30pm so make sure to watch it, and hopefully WA State politicians will watch it as well and put their hands in their pockets and fund the essential maintenance and repairs as a priority.

Send an email to Heritage Minister David Templeman, Premier Mark McGowan, Tourism Minister Paul Papalia and Member for Fremantle Simone McGurk, and urge them to preserve one of Western Australia’s most significant historic precincts!

Roel Loopers

ENJOY PERFECT FREO WA DAY WEEKEND

 

WA DAY June 3-4

 

The WA DAY long weekend is on with lots of activities today and tomorrow in the Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour. See details below.

Sunday 3 June 2018

Noon, Mews Park Smoking Ceremony, Smoking Ceremony and Welcome to Country presented by Neville Collard & Festival opening “We are Australian” James Webb and Monique Fitzgerald

12.00- 4.00pm, Piazza Suitcase Art Markets

12.00-2.00pm, Little Creatures Mermaid & Pirate Sandpit Storytelling

12.00-5.00pm, Shipwreck Gallery Museum Grounds, Pirate Craft activities

12.30pm-1pm, Mews Park Wadumbah Dance Group

1.00-1.15pm, Mews Park Children’s Fashion Parade featuring Australian made clothing

1.30-1.45pm , Mews Park Children’s Fashion Parade featuring Australian made clothing

1.00- 3.00pm, Mews Park Little Italy by the Sea Italian and Greek Dance Ensemble

3.00pm – 4.00pm, Roving Entertainment Chung Wah Lion Dance Troupe

4.00pm – 7.00pm, Mews Park Cuba de Son Latin Band

4.30- 7.30pm, Creatures NextDoor Live Jazz with Jazzco

5.00pm – 7.00pm, Roving Magnifico Mariachis Trio

6.00pm FIREWORKS over Fishing Boat Harbour

Firewoks Fishing Boat Harbour

 

Monday 4 June 2018

11.00- 3.00pm, Mews Park Cicerello’s Bouncy Castle

12.00- 4.00pm, Piazza Suitcase Art Markets

12.00-2.00pm, Little Creatures Fairy Facepainting (Free)

4.30- 7.30pm, Creatures NextDoor Live Music with ‘Basskong’

5.00- 8.00pm, Mews Park Live Music with ‘The Good Things’

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GHOST SHIPS OF THE PAST

Posted in aboriginal, city of fremantle, fremantle festival, history, indigenous, Uncategorized by freoview on November 5, 2017

 

High Tide 1

 

Ghost Ship is an experimental, experiential, site specific performance that offers unique and personal insights into Western Australia’s colonial history. Four Indigenous storytellers will share their individual insights and take us on a complex journey through our shared history and our complex past.

Unlike the books that hold the histories of European civilisation, nationhood and the colonial adventure, these Indigenous stories are momentary, ephemeral and tens of thousands of years old.

Come listen to Brett and Lily Nannup, Melissa Dinnison, Ezra Jacobs, Glenn Iseger-Pilkington

No matter who you are in Western Australia, it’s likely you have a relationship to the port of Fremantle. Many of us came here by ship. Fremantle’s rich history of migrants, exports, imports, exploration and multicultural melting pots culminate in varied social, cultural and political facets to the community.

Ghost Ship is the starting point for ongoing conversations that recognise our silenced histories and to take with us on our own journeys.

Curated Cultural Tours TODAY at the High Tide hub on Arthur Head next to the Roundhouse. 
11am – 12pm : Children Friendly
6pm – 7pm : With light installation

More info: http://www.hightidefremantle.com/line-up/ghost_ship/

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HOW FREO CELEBRATES WA DAY

Posted in community, fremantle, history, Uncategorized, western autralia by freoview on June 5, 2017

 

There is WA DAY entertainment at the Fremantle Esplanade all day today so go and enjoy the glorious day.

Spare Parts Theatre will be there with their puppets and Grace Barbe and band will perform in the afternoon.

There is a Freedom Fairy Show for the children, food stalls,  Bindi Bindi Dreaming, and Felicity Groom will also be performing.

A big sand sculpture will be created and the African Drumming Circle will be fun for young and old.

The Maritime Museum will have a stall and there is also the Perth Makers Market and more entertainment and music.

At Victoria Quay in Fremantle Port one of the world’s most high-tech research vessels, RV Sonne, will be open to the public.

Members of the public are invited to step on board, speak to the German and Australian marine scientists, check out the ship’s cutting-edge research technology and learn about current research campaigns in the Australian marine environment, and Australian-German research cooperation.

Have a fun WA DAY!

Roel Loopers

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MY PERSONAL AUSTRALIA DAY DATE

Posted in aboriginal, arthur head, australia day, fremantle by freoview on January 26, 2017
Bathers Beach and Arthur's Head, where British settlement started in 1829.

Bathers Beach and Arthur’s Head, where British settlement started in 1829.

 

My personal Australia Day is March 13, as it was a balmy day 35 years ago in 1982 when my German partner Brigitte and I arrived in Sydney for the biggest adventure of our life. A big contrast from the snow storm we had at our departure a day earlier at Nuremberg airport.

Soon we rented a sixth floor apartment with two large balconies at Bondi Junction and overlooked the stunning harbour, Opera House and Harbour Bridge, as well as the beaches.

The culture shock impact was reduced when we attended two months of language and culture classes at the Blackfriar school together with people from all over the world. We became friends with people from Iran, Austria, Indonesia, etc.

What stood out most for me in our new country was the multiculturalism, and of course the great blue sky and gorgeous weather.

My job as a infill photographer at the Sydney Morning Herald during the Brisbane Commonwealth Games was cancelled because there was a recession, so I ended up working as a kitchenhand and cook at a posh yacht club and waiter at a golf club.

Even work was all about multiculturalism. In the Rose Bay yacht club the manager was Dutch, the catering manager Czechoslovakian, the chef from Wales, the cooks French, while at the Chatswood golf club I worked for an Austrian chef and German manager.

After a year though I started as a freelance photographer working for designers, the Housing Commission of NSW and Rugby League Week magazine. Multiculturalism supported me again with an Iranian friend getting me the work at the Housing Commission while a designer who had migrated from Prague also gave me some assignments.

I was introduced to fish&chips, pies, cricket and cask wine and while test matches were boring I quite liked one day cricket. Now after 35 years in Australia you can’t get me away from the TV during a test match and Boxing Day is sacred for that. And of course I love Aussie Rules!

In September 1985 we decided to move to Perth and start all over again. We crossed the country in our old Honda Civic and bought our very first property, a small brand new villa in Como, on our first weekend in the west.

We registered our photography business and started showing my portfolio, with mainly B&W press photos, as I had been working for newspapers, magazines and press agencies in Germany. Soon we got our first assignments; a shoot at Blina near Derby for an oil company, the State Energy Commission liked my work and so did designers, advertising agencies, architects, the mining and tourism industries, Fremantle Ports, and government departments.

I became the official photographer for the Legislative Council and the the Governor of WA Gordon Reid for some years and through that the official photographer during the visit of HRH Princess Ann and travelled with her to the Kimberley and Pilbarra. A photo album with my photos of that visit was presented to HRH by then Premier Brian Burke on her last day here.

Life was so good that we soon bought a beautiful Californian bungalow in Swanbourne that we later extended. We bought the house from well-known artist Ashley Jones and his wife Nina and decided to keep their tradition of an open house on Friday evenings, and we ended up getting to know a lot of people fast that way.

In the late 80s my partner wanted to open an art gallery and Artplace in the Old Theatre Lane in Claremont became our new adventure and a great success for Brigitte, but after 20 years of living together we decided in the early 90s to split up and I moved to Fremantle.

Although I had a great life while living in the Netherlands for 20 years and in Germany for 13, Fremantle is the love of my life, so I soon became involved with community groups, the Walyalup Reconciliation Group, Fremantle Society, Roundhouse volunteer guides, etc. and was awarded Fremantle Citizen of the Year 2012 by the WA Premier.

I love Fremantle because it is full of interesting, quirky, caring and creative people from all over the world, and because of the stunning historic West End. There is not a day that I don’t drive onto the South Mole to look at the harbour and Indian Ocean and my favourite West End cafes know that I drink double espressos.

My respect for Aboriginal culture and people started early when I met Michelle, an Injibandi woman, at the Japingka Gallery. We became good friends and I one of the babysitters for her sons Simon and Reuben. I have always felt at home with our indigenous people and on my spiritual 58,000 km, eight-month trip criss crossing Australia in the mid 1990s I often connected with them as they showed me their land and told me their stories without ever treating me as someone responsible for their plight.

Multiculturalism is something I embrace and like, even in my love life, with lovers from Germany, Canada, Australia, Serbia and Sri Lanka. The one thing I absolutely can’t tolerate is racism because I believe that most people from all cultures and religions are good people.

Through my involvement with markets I became friends with many of the Muslim stall holders. All decent, hard-working family people who don’t pose a threat to anyone.

Adapting to my new country was often challenging but it helps that I am interested in just about everything, and having an open mind and a love for people. I handed back my Dutch passport in 1985 when I became Australian and never have regretted it.

Australia is not the best country on earth, no country is, but it is a bloody good one and I am so happy and grateful I made the brave decision to migrate here. It’s one of the best decisions I have ever made in my life!

I’ll be enjoying Australia Day at the Roundhouse talking to people from all over the world telling them about the fascinating history of Fremantle.

Roel Loopers

FREMANTLE PRISON CELEBRATES 25 YEARS OPEN

Posted in fremantle, fremantle prison, heritage by freoview on January 23, 2017

old prison fremantle

 

Fremantle Prison will be unlocked tomorrow, Tuesday January 24 from 2-6 pm to celebrate 25 years of being open to the public.

Get a FREE  sneak peek  inside the World Heritage listed old gaol that was built by convicts when the Swan River Colony became a penal colony for England in 1850.

Explore the large main cell block, check out the art exhibition and have a cold drink in the cafe.

Roel Loopers

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THE END OF FREO AUSTRALIA DAY FIREWORKS

In what no doubt will be a very controversial decision the Full Council of the City of Fremantle this evening decided to stop the Australia Day fireworks immediately and find alternative ways of celebrating the national public holiday in January.

I believe it is a very brave and the right decision by Fremantle Council that acknowledges that Australia Day is not a day of celebration or reconciliation for our indigenous people. The time for European immigrants to say that Aboriginal people should just suck it up and get used to it is well and truly over, and Fremantle Council is showing great leadership on this divisive issue.

There were very passionate speeches by indigenous people who pointed out the massacres and rapes, the atrocities at the Rottnest Island Quod gaol and the Roundhouse, and as one of them said “We should all be proud of belonging to an ancients culture.”

Fremantle Chamber of Commerce board member Ra Steward was quite outraged that the fireworks might be stopped saying it showed blatant disregard for businesses and it would be a disaster if shops closed on Australia Day.

Mayor Brad Pettitt said the end of the fireworks would be a great opportunity for a new event and that we can get a better bang for our buck. He said that we could benefit culturally and socially as a community and move forward.

Councillor Jon Strachan pointed out that the fireworks on Australia Day are the single most expensive day on Fremantle’s events calendar and that stopping them would help us move further down the path of reconciliation.

Councillor Sam Wainwright paraphrased author Richard Flannagan that a worst day could not be found to celebrate Australia Day.

Councillor Dave Hume was the only Elected Member who spoke who did not agree with cancelling the fireworks. He said that Australia Day was a public holiday by the Federal Government and Fremantle as the festival city should celebrate it. “We do things on public holidays!”

I have no doubt the debate about this will continue and what alternative event(s) the COF might want to put up during the long weekend in January, but showing real respect for our indigenous culture and realising the hurt the British invasion has caused, is in my opinion a significant step forward, so I congratulate Fremantle Council!

Roel Loopers

HISTORIC PANORAMAS STUNNING HISTORIC VIEWS

Posted in fremantle, heritage, history, western australia by freoview on August 2, 2016

The new Historic Panoramas website features some stunning historic photos of Fremantle and Perth. It is a work in process and hopefully many more panoramas will be included on the site, but check it out and see if you can support it with historic and modern photos.

This is what the HP people say about the site:

The Historical Panoramas project provides a unique and visually interesting way to explore the development of Perth and Fremantle as far back as the 1860s.

Photographic panoramas provide a very good way to understand the physical layout of a cityscape. Unlike individual photos which can be hard to understand context and location, panoramas often provide very good spatial awareness and convey a good visual impression of a location.

For this project we are fortunate that Perth and Fremantle are relatively young cities. Perth was established in 1829 and the dawn of commercial photography was in the 1840s. The oldest panorama of Perth we have found so far is from the 1860s – showing a very young city. We can therefore see the very early days of the city with the visual clarity that photography provides. Of course, prior to settlement these areas were inhabited by the local Noongar people and the older panoramas provide a glimpse of what that life might have been like with bushland visible in the distance.

Go here: http://www.historicalpanoramas.com.au

Roel Loopers

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WARDERS COTTAGES RENOVATIONS LOOKING GOOD

h 1

I am delighted to see the historic Warders Cottages in Fremantle’s Henderson Street being renovated back to their former glory. They already look great so I can’t wait to see them being occupied again after years of vacancy and neglect.

The former courthouse and police lock up have been bought by Fremantle developers Silverleaf and I hear the complex might become a restaurant and tourist accommodation, but time will tell.

The City of Fremantle has budgeted $ 800,000 to buy one of the cottages, but I wonder what the plans for it could be. The cottages are small and quite dark, so what community use could they have. Or is the City considering putting it out for affordable accommodation.

There is no doubt that the area will be activated when people live in the cottages again and will help security in the area as well.

Roel Loopers

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