Freo's View

BEACY HOME OF MANY ANGLES

Posted in architecture, city of fremantle, lifestyle, living, Uncategorized by freoview on August 19, 2019

 

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No, this photo was not taken somewhere in the south of Europe but in McCleery Street, Beaconsfield. All those angles just fascinated me when I walked past it today.

Roel Loopers

MORE SUSTAINABILITY FOR FREMANTLE

Posted in city of fremantle, city planning, environment, local government, Uncategorized by freoview on August 14, 2019

 

Fremantle has updated its Sustainable Building Policy to ensure Fremantle continues to be a leader in sustainable development.

The Sustainable Building Policy was adopted in 2011 and requires new residential and commercial buildings with a floor area of greater than 1000m2 to achieve a minimum 4-star ‘Green Star’ rating.

Mayor Brad Pettitt said as a result of the policy Fremantle had become a showcase for sustainable development.

“The award winning Liv apartments in Queen Victoria Street and the Evermore development in White Gum Valley have both been designed and built to be more energy efficient, saving residents money on power bills, and both have achieved One Planet accreditation thanks to their water and energy saving appliances, solar PV, double-glazing, organic waste and recycling facilities.

The Kings Square Renewal project component by Sirona Capital will feature 5-star Green Star commercial spaces, while the City’s new civic centre will be one of the most energy efficient buildings of its size in Australia.

The refinements made to the City’s Sustainable Building Policy include allowing the use of other equivalent assessment tools, such as One Planet certification, and streamlining implementation measures to clarify how compliance will be achieved before and after construction.

In reviewing the Sustainable Building Policy, the council also voted to rescind its Energy Efficient Building Design Policy, adopted in 2000, because the Building Code, national guidelines and other state planning policies have overtaken it.

The Freo Mayor said  “It’s another example of where local governments can explore new and innovative ideas at a local level, and if they prove successful they can be adopted more broadly.”

In addition to the Sustainable Building Policy the City of Fremantle also has planning policies that allow higher density if the development meets certain sustainability requirements, such as achieving a higher energy rating, the installation of solar panels and a rainwater tank or greywater system.

The Knutsford East Local Structure Plan also offers bonuses in height and density for design and sustainability excellence.

The Knutsford precinct includes Landcorp’s ground-breaking East Village development, in which 36 homes will be powered by 100 per cent renewable energy using roof top solar panels and a shared community battery.

In an Australian first, a village micro-grid will allow residents to generate and share energy with their neighbours using an innovative energy trading platform.

Roel Loopers

FREO CIVIC CENTRE UPDATE

 

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The Fremantle Kings Square Redevelopment Project is going very well with the Sirona Capital buildings nearing completion, the Henderson Street car park has a new shade structure on the roof, and the new Civic Centre construction is also on track.

Roel Loopers

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UNDERCURRENT 19 FREMANTLE BIENNALE OF SITE SPECIFIC ART

WATERLICHT by Daan Roosegarde

 

A massive hundred people from arts, culture and business attended the very long launch of the Fremantle Biennale 2019 at the Maritime Museum on Thursday morning.

UNDERCURRENT 19 will be a fantastic experience for the Fremantle community and beyond and is an invitation to interact with Fremantle through artistic dialogues and site sensitive events. It will create new visual narratives which articulate the spirit of place, so make sure to check out the program here: http://www.fremantlebiennale.com.au/undercurrent/

The biennale runs from November 1-24 and is happening all over the Freo CBD with major events at Fremantle Port and Notre Dame University, the Shipwrecks Museum, etc.

Nicola Forrest of sponsor Minderoo Foundation was at the launch, as was the CEO of Fremantle Ports, former MP Melissa Parke, the Fremantle Mayor and several councillors, artists, curators, architects, art administrators, etc.

Here some titles of exciting events during Undercurrent 19: Pearls and Blackbirds about female divers, Behavioral Ecology, the cute South Mole Resort will be a must to visit, Desire Lines, the Somnus theatre of the sea, Midnight Blue Lagoon. the Standing Wave sound installation in the submarine, Ebb&Flow audience communication, the Billboard Project, etc.

There will also be a symposium at Notre Dame University about how artists make a living.

One of the highlights of Undercurrent 19 will be WATERLICHT by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde about our battle with water, rising sea levels and dwindling fresh water.

Roosegarde said about rising ocean levels in the typical pragmatic and laconic Dutch way “We innovate or we die”

I loved the 2017 inaugural Fremantle Biennale so can’t wait for it to start in three months from now.

Roel Loopers

CONNECTING FREO’S FUTURE TO THE PAST

 

I enjoy talking with architects, city planners and developers about Fremantle’s future and have found it educational and inspiring to have discussions with City of Fremantle heritage coordinator architect Alan Kelsall about how we should try to grow Fremantle.

Alan and I agree that in general the Fremantle community recognises that the need for regeneration of the city is necessary and that it is desirable if done well: if it is managed, planned and implemented in ways that reinforce and sustain the sense of Fremantle’s distinctiveness embodied in it, such as the rich mix of built heritage and unique urban character.

However, without broad, long-term public support and commitment to the planning vision for Fremantle it is unlikely to be successful. As a community we therefore need to have a clear understanding of what we mean when we try to articulate it. The ultimate outcome will set the standard for good design within Freo’s heritage areas and getting it right is essential to securing the future of our heritage buildings.

Let’s consider Fremantle’s history and what it means in the context of future growth of our city. Fremantle was developed as a port town and a centre of trade, and for most of its history it was prosperous and acknowledged as the second city in the metro area. That underscores the city’s distinct character and its rich heritage.

The prosperity of Fremantle encouraged the construction of its present heritage buildings. These developments were not simply utilitarian or profit based, but showed a desire to display a mix of business confidence and civic pride. That is probably why these buildings have a quality that people continue to find attractive, and why most people in our community believe it is worth conserving them, not only as memorial of the past but also as exemplars of successful, high quality architecture, urban design and city planning.

Fremantle had buildings with a strong association with the working port, but also buildings that provided a diverse mix of uses. These included schools, shops, places to work and socialise, etc. which people living in its densely populated catchment could reach on foot or by public transport. It is what we now consider to be an example of sustainable urban design.

Fremantle Port played a primary role in Freo’s success and its distinct character due to the facts that processing, storage and distribution of export and import commodities took place in buildings located near the harbour. It created the mutual interdependence between the port and the city that generated and sustained our port city character.

However this pattern of beneficial evolution changed in 1969 with the introduction of containerisation, which caused profound changes in Fremantle, not only because it changed the way in which ships were loaded and unloaded but also because storage and distribution of export and import commodities no longer took place near the harbour. These changes completely severed the earlier mutual supporting interdependencies between the harbour, city centre and surrounding residential suburbs. The changes impacted not only on shipping and its associated industries but also affected the commercial, retail, social and residential vitality of the city. In addition it caused deterioration of the quality of public areas and less appreciation of the worth of its heritage buildings.

It is obviously impossible, and probably not even desirable, to try to replicate the primary role played by the port in the past, but it is possible, through new higher density mixed-use development located between Victoria Quay and Kings Square, within reach of the railway station, to reproduce the type of mutually supporting interdependencies that used to exist between the port and the city centre. For this to be successful though it demands that development is guided by integrated strategic planning that is inspired, but not limited, by the past to create the conditions of genuine everyday activities, that should come as a result of more people living and working and enjoying social leisure time in all its diversity within the same area.

It is important to recognise that the role residential development on appropriate sites in the CBD can play is crucial to generating the vitality and resilience needed to cope with future problems and to adjust to changing circumstances. A fundamental benefit of regenerating and revitalising the area in this way is that it would promote positive change and would contribute to re-establishing Fremantle’s city centre as the heart of the community, which has already started with the Kings Square redevelopment project.

If Fremantle’s heritage is not managed carefully because it is considered to be too hard it will be at risk of being lost and with this its potential to enrich the city in ways that give a sense of distinctiveness, meaning and quality to the places in which people live and work, as well as the sense of destination that attracts people to Freo and makes them want to come and spend time in our city and thus contribute to secure its future.

It is a huge challenge to get it right, but with respectful dialogue between developers, city planners and the community we can all positively contribute to Fremantle’s progress and future.

Roel Loopers

A huge thank you to Alan Kelsall for his collaboration with constructing this article!

 

 

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REFLECTION OF ST JOHN’S CHURCH

 

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On a slow Fremantle news day it is nice to reflect, so here a reflection of the St John Anglican church in Kings Square in the new facade of the former Myer building.

 

Roel Loopers

GOOD FACELIFT FOR FREO’S HIGH STREET

 

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Fremantle High Street is looking a lot better now that all the yellow artwork foil has been removed and many of the facades repainted. There is only one building left with some yellow on it at No 10 and that belongs to renowned architect Michael Patroni who wants to remove all the paint I have been told and return the historic building to its former glory of tuck pointed brick.

I hear that several owners have started to ask for quotes to also get their buildings along High Street painted, so that is a pretty good outcome of what was an expensive debacle after the removal of the stunning Felice Varini artwork proved to be far more complicated than anticipated.

Roel Loopers

 

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MILESTONE FOR FREMANTLE KINGS SQUARE DEVELOPMENT

 

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Another important milestone has been reached at the Fremantle Kings Square Redevelopment Project with the crane going up today for the construction of the new City of Fremantle Civic Centre.

Roel Loopers

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SOUTH FREMANTLE PHOTO FEATURE

Posted in art, city of fremantle, community, hospitality, photography, Uncategorized by freoview on July 1, 2019

 

 

After a week of wet weather and mainly being inside I needed to get out and about  and get some fresh air and exercise, so I decided to do a little photo feature on South Fremantle. I walked around for an hour and took these shots.

Roel Loopers

MORE PROTECTION IN NEW HERITAGE ACT

 

It is important for Fremantle that stronger protections for Western Australia’s heritage places will come into effect on July 1, 2019, with the gazettal of the new Heritage Act 2018 and Heritage Regulations 2019 taking place today (June 27).

The new legislation replaces the outdated Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990, aligning WA with other States by ensuring better protections for important heritage places, particularly those left to ‘demolition by neglect’.

Key changes include:

  • A streamlined process for entering a place in the State Register of Heritage Places;
  • Clarity for owners wishing to develop their heritage places;
  • Better protection for heritage places at risk from ‘demolition by neglect’;
  • Increased transparency by publishing the Heritage Council’s advice to the Minister for Heritage on the inclusion of a place in the State Register; and
  • Time limits on certain decisions to provide certainty for decision-makers, industry and the community. 

The Heritage Council provides technical and professional assistance, and promotes public awareness and knowledge in relation to the State’s cultural heritage.

For a copy of the new Act and regulations, visit http://www.dplh.wa.gov.au

 

Roel Loopers

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