Freo's View

DENSITY MUST HAVE PUBLIC BENEFITS

Posted in city of fremantle, community, development, western australia by freoview on September 5, 2016

I received the information below from the Committee for Perth today and since infill and higher density is very relevant to Fremantle I copy it below:

Lunch Learnings: Densifying the Suburbs

At the latest Committee for Perth’s Perth in Focus luncheon, Densifying the Suburbs, Planning Minister the Hon. Donna Faragher opened the event by talking about the soon-to-be released Design WA report.

The Minister said the report would ensure that good design was also cost effective, functional, liveable, vibrant and sustainable and that design review panels would be standardised and prioritised to support DAPs.

Emma Booth, Team Leader Design at North Sydney Council, explained how the council had an on-again, off-again love affair with density since the 1950’s. The council is now focused on creating 12,000-14,000 new residences and 10,000 new jobs by 2031. To achieve this, they spent three years preparing and implementing a design strategy.

The key findings from the strategy are:
Start by mapping urban renewal opportunities.
Do density once and do it well.
Measure the financial uplift of density and capture part of the value to deliver amenity that benefits the community.
Good design is achieved through a design process not a static plan.
Densifying the suburbs also means densifying the land use mix.
There is no point increasing density around train stations without decreasing car use.
Density must be supported by commensurate public benefits.
Value capture is possible with an endorsed strategy.

Keynote speaker, Associate Professor Julian Bolleter, from the Australian Urban Design Research Centre at The University of Western Australia spoke about the findings in his book ‘Scavenging the Suburbs: Auditing Perth for 1 Million Infill Dwellings’.

The book examined how many infill homes could be created by better utilising land around Perth.

Associate Professor Bolleter’s provocative views are that Perth could infill more and contain sprawl if:
Each person in Perth only had 75m2 of garden space instead of the current 132m2 it would create 115,000 infill dwellings.
50% of publicly owned carparks had homes built above them and carparks below it would create 203,000 dwellings.
Freeway reserves were reduced, 50,000 new homes could be created.
10% of light industrial areas were developed for housing it would create 95,434 affordable homes.
The amount of public park space was reduced from 40m2 to 28m2 per person 144,000 homes.
Golf courses were reduced to 9 holes it would yield 86,000 homes.
10% of the foreshore was used for development it would create 62,000 dwellings.

While admitting it was controversial, Assistant Professor Bolleter said that if all of the recommendations were followed it would create 913,879 dwellings, obviate the need for 97 masterplanned communities the size of Ellenbrook and no greenfield homes would need to be built in Perth until 2036.

One Response

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  1. Mark said, on September 6, 2016 at 12:34 pm

    If you want every part of your existence controlled
    If you want to exist like one of the many high density cities in the world
    If we want to lose what makes our cities considered to be the most liveable in the world
    If you want ever step of your existence just to be part of a daily routine
    Then this plan sounds like the one to exist not live

    The only points that make sense are housing in industrial areas and housing over carparks

    Just more social engineering, great outcome we all get about 50% less green space

    It will be all about less green, less trees, less space, more stress, lower life style, typical socialist BS!

    Of course their regular attack came on the car and roads.

    More concrete, less trees, less plants, less flowers, bigger concrete heat sink, which we know is bad for our health, physical & mental plus lowers life expectancy, which may well be the point of the plan.


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